Breakfast with Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo

Breakfast with Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo

Dec. 22, 2010MAIOCCO ARCHIVE49ERS PAGE 49ERS VIDEOMatt MaioccoCSNBayArea.comSt. Louis Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo does not have to play any cat-and-mouse games leading up to Sunday's matchup against the 49ers that might end up deciding the NFC West champion.When asked Wednesday morning on a conference call with three Bay Area reporters if he were prepared to announce the identity of his starting quarterback for the game, Spagnuolo answered, "I don't think I need to do that."Rookie Sam Bradford is clearly their quarterback. He has started all 14 games, and figures to be in that role for a long, long time. Bradford this season became the third rookie in NFL history to throw for more than 3,000 yards, joining the likes of Peyton Manning and Matt Ryan.The 49ers, meanwhile, are trying to keep Spagnuolo, a defensive mastermind, guessing whether he'll see Alex Smith or Troy Smith on Sunday. Alex Smith is 4-1 as a starter against the Rams, while Troy Smith threw for 356 yards in a 23-20 overtime victory Nov. 14 against St. Louis.REWIND: Smith, 49ers overcome penalties, Rams in OT
Spagnuolo joined 49ers reporters Wednesday morning on a conference call. Here is a little of what he had to say:--Does the uncertainty at the 49ers' quarterback situation impact the Rams' ability to put together a game plan?
Spagnuolo: "We had a similar situation last week for Kansas City (Matt Cassel or Brodie Croyle). I've always been a firm believer, there might be a few things here and there, but you're defending the system. The thing I know about San Francisco is they run the ball terrifically well. They have a great offensive line. So we'll have to prepare for both in some regards. There are slight differences. But there are a lot of other things that that football team does offensively really, really well and they do it well with either quarterback."STATS: Alex Smith 2010 splits Troy Smith 2010 splits
--Is it different preparing to face a 49ers team that does not have running back Frank Gore?
Spagnuolo: "Again, I'm not so sure it does. I look at Alex Smith as a very athletic, quality quarterback. And we know what Troy Smith did to us last time, so I put both quarterbacks up there high. We prepare for a very good quarterback whoever's taking the snaps. And I have a lot of respect for Frank Gore, and it's a shame that he got hurt. But I know this, they have two very good running backs, and one I'm very, very familiar with (Brian Westbrook) and have a lot of respect for, and I know the rookie has done a good job too, (Anthony) Dixon."--After game against you guys, teams seemed to have a book on Troy Smith . . .
Spagnuolo: "I wish somebody had shared that book with us. He had a terrific game against us."--Was it a priority to keep him contained in the pocket that game?
Spagnuolo: "Oh, yeah. We knew. They had the game in London before they played us. They had the bye week. I thought he played terrific, and we didn't finish some things. We had some chances, and he made us miss. He's a terrific athlete and a good football player, he had a great day that particular day, but we're moving on. They've had a lot of games since then. We have, too. We face each other on Sunday."--Is there a mental edge you have, as the other team plays a cat-and-mouse game at quarterback?
Spagnuolo: "We don't get all wrapped up in that, to be honest with you."--Is there a sense of accomplishment of how far the Rams have come under your leadership?
Spagnuolo: "There are a lot of people involved in this whole thing, and we knew it would take a lot of people. What we're most proud of is everybody to a man or woman in this building has bought in and embraced what we're trying to do. We've seen some fruits of that in recent weeks, and we'd like to see more. We have a very difficult challenge coming up this Sunday that's what want to stay focused on. When they tell us the season's over, whenever that is, we'll reflect back on what we've accomplished and where we go from there."RELATED: Spotlight on the Enemy -- St. Louis Rams
On the difficult loss to the 49ers in Week 10.
Spagnuolo: "At that particular time, you feel it. And then the guys here in this building, coaches, players, administration, have learned when you go through the adversity of losing a football game, you dust yourself off on Monday and you can't stay focused on the past, and you move on to the next one. It was meaningful because it was a divisional game. But they're all the same. We feel the same way when we have one point less than the opponent at the end of the game, it counts the same in the league standings."--Did you get any clarification from the NFL Office after the controversial pass-interference penalty called on safety O.J. Atogwe in overtime that set up 49ers for winning field goal?
Spagnuolo: "I'm not going to go back to that play. We've moved on from all of it. All the plays in that game. The officials officiate. Whatever they see, they call. And both teams live with it and move on and play."--Bradford has seen a recent dip in production. Is there anything that you can point to as a reason?
Spagnuolo: "We look at it as a complete 11-man procedure here. Certainly, the quarterback is the most important guy on offense, so people will look and have certain perceptions when you're doing well and not doing well. But Sam has been -- this is an obvious statement -- a tremendous addition to this football team, not just on offense but to the team, as well. The other 10 guys guys in the huddle are there with him, they respond to him. He'd like to a have a few plays back. We all would. But he's a resilient guy and a tremendous, tremendous, fierce competitor. And that's what we love most about him."RELATED: Sam Bradford season stats
--On what he's seen from the 49ers' secondary.
Spagnuolo: "I just showed a tape to the team. The one thing I see back there is that they're very opportunistic in the secondary. They make a bunch of plays there. They're a good defensive football team. It all starts up front, but they've made a bunch of plays. Nate Clements is a terrific football player. They got some safeties playing well. (Shawntae) Spencer does a nice job. I look out there, I see a good, solid defense out there -- all 11."

Reports: Former 49ers wide receiver to visit Bills

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AP

Reports: Former 49ers wide receiver to visit Bills

Aquan Boldin is looking for a new football home.

And the former 49ers wide receiver is visiting with the Bills on Monday, according to multiple reports.

Boldin started all 16 games with the Lions last season, recording 67 catches for 584 yards and eight touchdowns.

From 2013 to 2015 with the 49ers, he racked up 237 receptions, 3030 receiving yards and 16 touchdowns.

The three-time Pro Bowler will turn 37 years old in October.

Boldin entered the NFL as the 54th overall pick in the 2003 draft.

Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

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Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

There is no shortage of blame to go around for the Atlanta Falcons’ collapse in Super Bowl 51.

The Falcons built a 28-3 lead in the middle of the third quarter and let it slip away, ultimately falling to the New England Patriots, 34-28, in overtime.

Matt Ryan voiced one previously undisclosed factor in the collapse this week in an interview with Pete Prisco of CBS Sports, pointing the finger at the new coach of the 49ers.

Kyle Shanahan has been the focus of a lot of the blame, but critique from the league MVP was a new one.

The Falcons quarterback faulted his former offensive coordinator for taking too much time to relay the play calls. Ryan said he did not have enough time to change any of the plays – presumably checking out of called pass plays to run the ball.

Here’s what Ryan told Prisco:

"Kyle's play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in. As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you're talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, 'There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.' You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.

"With the way Kyle's system was set up, he took more time to call plays and we shift and motion a lot more than we did with (former coordinator) Dirk (Koetter). You couldn't get out of stuff like that. We talk about being the most aggressive team in football. And I'm all for it. But there's also winning time. You're not being aggressive not running it there."

The 49ers can point to mismanagement of the clock for their own Super Bowl heartbreak. The 49ers’ offense had the perfect play call at the perfect time against the Baltimore Ravens late in Super Bowl XLVII.

But with the play clock striking :00, coach Jim Harbaugh was forced to call a timeout from the sideline. A split-second later, the ball was snapped and it appeared the quarterback run would have easily ended up with Colin Kaepernick in the end zone.

Much like after the 49ers’ loss, the Falcons left plenty of room for second-guessing.

Two of Shanahan’s plays calls, which directly led to the collapse, will forever be scrutinized.

The first came with 8:31 remaining in regulation and the Falcons holding a 28-12 lead. On third and 1 from the Atlanta 36, Shanahan did not remain conservative with an expected run play. He swung for the fence.

Receiver Aldrick Robinson, whom the 49ers added this offseason as a free-agent pickup, was breaking free past the Patriots secondary for what could have been a touchdown. But just as Ryan was unloading, New England linebacker Dont’a Hightower hit him and forced the fumble. Running back Devonta Freeman whiffed on blitz pickup, which would have provided Ryan with enough time to target Robinson deep.

Ryan’s explanation does not appear applicable on this play, though. In watching the replay, the Falcons broke the huddle with more than 25 seconds remaining on the play clock and the snap occurred with :15 to spare.

The other questionable sequence came after the Falcons – leading by eight points -- got to the New England 22-yard line with less than five minutes to play. The Falcons lost 1 yard on a run play on first down.

On second down, Ryan was sacked for a 12-yard loss. Before that play, the Falcons broke the huddle with :19 on the play clock. The snap occurred with :04 remaining. The game clock was running, so the Falcons had reason to attempt to burn as much clock as possible.

In the fourth quarter, the Falcons never seemed rushed to get off a play. The closest they came to delay-of-game penalties were when they snapped the ball with :04 on the one play and :03 another time. The majority of their snaps occurred with :10 or more seconds to spare.

If the Falcons were guilty of anything when it came to the play clock, it was that the offense did not waste more time. After New England pulled to within 28-9 late in the third quarter, the Falcons ran only six offensive plays while the game clock was running.

On those six plays, the Falcons snapped the ball with :13, :09, :14, :20, :13 and :04 remaining on the play clock. If they’d snapped the ball with one second remaining each time, they could have shortened the game by 1 minute, 7 seconds. The Patriots scored the game-tying touchdown with :57 remaining in regulation.