Fangio isn't divulging differences between coaching Harbaughs

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Fangio isn't divulging differences between coaching Harbaughs

SANTA CLARA -- Vic Fangio is uniquely qualified to compare and contrast the NFL coaches who will make history Thursday night as the first brothers to face each other when the 49ers meet the Baltimore Ravens.Fangio, the longtime NFL assistant coach, had never met the Harbaughs before John Harbaugh retained him on the Ravens coaching staff in 2008. After two seasons with John Harbaugh, Fangio moved cross country to join Jim Harbaugh's Stanford staff as defensive coordinator.
"I'm probably the person that has the most perspective on that because I was with John his first two years in Baltimore and worked closely with him there in his first head-coaching job," said Fangio, who is currently the 49ers' defensive coordinator."And, obviously, I've been with Jim last year at Stanford and the transition coming over to here and everything that's involved with that."Jim Harbaugh and John Harbaugh were born 17 months apart and had a coach, Jack Harbaugh, as their father. But they are not exactly carbon copies, Fangio said.RELATED: The Har-Bowl page
"And I would say about 30 percent of them is similar, being that they're from the same family, same parents and all that," Fangio said. "But 70 percent of them are very different. They're two very different individuals, two very different, in most cases."And how, exactly, are they different?"That's top secret," Fangio said. "That's my information and I'm keeping it to myself."Fangio already had an extensive NFL resume when he joined the Ravens in 2006 as defensive special assistant to head coach Brian Billick. Fangio worked on both sides of the ball while with the Ravens. He was one of the lead voice in the booth to assist Billick with replay challenges."(I) basically did a lot of work with the coaches, both sides of the ball, and worked with the head coach in helping him do his duties particularly during the game," Fangio said."It was really a great experience for me. It really was, working both sides of the ball and getting a better, full perspective of everything. It's something that I would recommend for everybody to do if they could."It was that kind of perspective that helped Fangio formulate his philosophy last week as he devised a game play against Arizona Cardinals second-year quarterback John Skelton. The 49ers chose to play coverage the entire game against Skelton and Richard Bartel. Not once did he call for a defense that sent more than four pass-rushers at the Cardinals' quarterbacks.REWIND: 49ers never blitzed Cardinals
"A lot of people think when you play a young quarterback you should go after him, send the kitchen sink," Fangio said. "But many times that makes his job easier because if he sees pressure, he can throw somewhere to where he's got a one-on-one matchup."Sometimes against a young quarterback, it's good to make him be a quarterback, drop back there, read his coverage, find an open receiver, go through his progression. I think that's tougher on a young quarterback in some instances, and that's the approach I took that past game."The plan figures to be different Thanksgiving night against Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco and his explosive surrounding cast that includes running back Ray Rice, and receivers Lee Evans, Anquan Boldin and rookie Torrey Smith."They have a really explosive and dynamic personnel group," Fangio said. "I think it's probably the best offensive skill position personnel that the Ravens have ever had since they moved to Baltimore."

Shanahan delegates offensive duties to 49ers staff

Shanahan delegates offensive duties to 49ers staff

SANTA CLARA – Kyle Shanahan will retain the role he held the past nine seasons in his first year as head coach of the 49ers.

Shanahan eschewed the formality of naming an offensive coordinator because he will keep those duties for himself. Still, Shanahan made it clear that he alone will not be able to fix the 49ers’ offense.

Shanahan has assembled a supporting cast that he said makes him comfortable to delegate responsibilities whenever his attention has to be focused on something other than the team’s offense.

“I mix it up,” said Shanahan, who previously held offensive coordinator roles with Houston, Washington, Cleveland and Atlanta. “Different guys have different attributes.”

Mike McDaniel and Mike LaFleur joined Shanahan after time together on the Atlanta Falcons’ offensive staff. McDaniel is the run-game specialist, while LaFleur, the wide receivers coach, is the pass-game specialist.

Tight ends coach Jon Embree, formerly the head coach at Colorado, is Shanahan’s assistant head coach. Shanahan said Embree has a vocal role on his staff.

Moreover, long-time NFL running backs coach Bobby Turner is a trusted assistant after spending 14 seasons in Denver and four more in Washington with Mike Shanahan, Kyle’s father. Turner coached under Kyle Shanahan the past two seasons with the Falcons.

”Bobby Turner’s been an assistant head coach for our teams we’ve had in the past and anytime that I need him to take over, he does,” Shanahan said. “So it depends what period it is, depends what we’re talking about.”

The 49ers opened organized team activities last week. It was the first time the 49ers’ rookies and veterans were together on the field for offense vs. defense practices. Shanahan said it takes some adjustment for him to figure out how to best budget his time during the workouts.

“I’m used to knowing exactly where to go and what to do and I always did that from an offensive coordinator standpoint which I still do a lot of those responsibilities,” Shanahan said. “So, at times, I feel most comfortable when I go to do that because that’s something to do. But, when I pass it over to some other guys and let them do it, I find myself walking around a lot and I’m not used to that.

“It feels awkward, but I don’t think it’s a bad thing. I think I should walk around and watch everyone and see it. I always see it on the tape, but that’s later at night. You want players to know you’re there and paying attention to everything and I usually try to cover that in meetings the next day also.”

Harbaugh goes Biblical, responds to Jacobs' criticisms of his coaching

Harbaugh goes Biblical, responds to Jacobs' criticisms of his coaching

Former NFL running back Brandon Jacobs spent one season with the San Francisco 49ers in 2012 under head coach Jim Harbaugh.

Jacobs only played in two games and gained seven yards on five carries. The results were nothing like his 5,087 yards and 60 touchdowns over eight years with the Giants. 

Apparently being pushed to the bench as a 31-year-old veteran running back didn't sit well with Jacobs. 

“Going somewhere where they don’t have route conversions into certain coverages was just absurd,” Jacobs said Thursday on the Tiki and Tierney Show. “They’re just running routes in the defense, getting people killed. Size and strength is what they had, and that’s why they won.

"Let’s be real. They had great assistant coaches, but Jim didn’t know what he was doing. Jim had no idea. Jim is throwing slants into Cover-2 safeties, getting people hurt. That guy knew nothing, man."

On Saturday morning, Harbaugh responded to Jacobs with a tweet to him. 

Harbaugh went 44-19-1 in four seasons as the 49ers' head coach. He also added five playoff wins and a trip to the Super Bowl in the 2012-13 season, the one that Jacobs played for him.