Harbaugh-Carroll rivalry jumps from NCAA to NFL

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Harbaugh-Carroll rivalry jumps from NCAA to NFL

Sept. 7, 2011MAIOCCO ARCHIVE
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Matt MaioccoCSNBayArea.com
SANTA CLARA -- Jim Harbaugh and Pete Carroll actually agreed on something Wednesday afternoon.

Both men stated they have not experienced much personal interaction through the years. Professionally, it's another story.
Their unique rapport is best summarized by a five-second midfield exchange two seasons ago after Stanford's 55-21 victory over USC at the Los Angeles Coliseum. Harbaugh ordered a two-point conversion attempt late in the game, which was widely seen as a slap in the face of the Trojans.
"What's your deal? Are you all right?" Carroll asked Harbaugh, as captured by a TV camera and microphone on the field.
"Yeah, I'm great," Harbaugh responded. "What's your deal?""Nice game," Carroll said.Harbaugh and Carroll are no longer a part of the Stanford-USC rivalry. Now, they're NFC West opponents and will square off for the first time Sunday at Candlestick Park when Carroll's Seahawks face Harbaugh's 49ers.
"Tune in to see what the coaches are going to say to each other before the game, after the game," Harbaugh quipped on Wednesday. "Anything that's been said before has pretty well been documented and over-documented. And in the end, it's an 11-on-11 game."Is it really that exciting, that intriguing, to find out what they're going to talk about? What's relevant is this game will be determined by the players and the coaches."
Added Carroll, "Better listen very carefully -- better see a lot of boom mikes when we're talking out there. Got to get the straight scoop on what's really up."What's really up -- what's really the deal -- is that is that while they're certainly not friendly, Harbaugh and Carroll both claim to have respect for the other. Carroll talked about Harbaugh's toughness and competitive nature. Harbaugh complimented how Carroll always has his teams well-prepared.And the roles are reversed from a year ago, when Carroll was making his coaching debut with the Seahawks.
The 49ers remember what it's like to prepare to face the uncertainty of a team that features a coach coming directly from the college ranks."I can specifically remember going into the game and they were very vanilla all the preseason and we had no idea what we were going to get," 49ers quarterback Alex Smith said. "We were watching USC film and trying to anticipate what we were going to get. So it was difficult."Carroll described the 49ers' offensive approach of the exhibition season as "basic." Both offensively and defensively, the 49ers were careful not to reveal too much of their identity.And that even carried over into Wednesday, when Harbaugh declined to talk about the percentage of the offense that was featured in the 49ers' four tuneup games."When you're in a division, you get to know your opponent a little bit and you see them play other teams," Carroll said. "It's a different level of familiarity. In both of our cases, we've played against each other a few times."It's a little more like a division matchup, where you have some background. Whether that benefits anybody, I don't know. But that's what it feels like."The Seahawks this year are the ones studying college film to try to get a handle on what the 49ers might do.Seattle quarterback Tarvaris Jackson said he has watched film of the 49ers during the exhibition season. But he has also studied Stanford's schemes from a year ago in an attempt to gain insight into 49ers defensive coordinator Vic Fangio's approach.
Jackson has solicited input from former Stanford receiver Doug Baldwin. He also plans to speak with cornerback Richard Sherman, also a rookie from Stanford."(Baldwin) gave me some insight on what the defensive coordinator likes to do," Jackson said. "He knows him and watched him a lot. I'll probably get with (Sherman) today or tomorrow and ask him a couple things -- different indicators he can help me out with."Who knows if he's going to keep doing the same things he did at Stanford, so we have to be prepared for both. So I have to make sure I go back and do some history on that."

Shanahan delegates offensive duties to 49ers staff

Shanahan delegates offensive duties to 49ers staff

SANTA CLARA – Kyle Shanahan will retain the role he held the past nine seasons in his first year as head coach of the 49ers.

Shanahan eschewed the formality of naming an offensive coordinator because he will keep those duties for himself. Still, Shanahan made it clear that he alone will not be able to fix the 49ers’ offense.

Shanahan has assembled a supporting cast that he said makes him comfortable to delegate responsibilities whenever his attention has to be focused on something other than the team’s offense.

“I mix it up,” said Shanahan, who previously held offensive coordinator roles with Houston, Washington, Cleveland and Atlanta. “Different guys have different attributes.”

Mike McDaniel and Mike LaFleur joined Shanahan after time together on the Atlanta Falcons’ offensive staff. McDaniel is the run-game specialist, while LaFleur, the wide receivers coach, is the pass-game specialist.

Tight ends coach Jon Embree, formerly the head coach at Colorado, is Shanahan’s assistant head coach. Shanahan said Embree has a vocal role on his staff.

Moreover, long-time NFL running backs coach Bobby Turner is a trusted assistant after spending 14 seasons in Denver and four more in Washington with Mike Shanahan, Kyle’s father. Turner coached under Kyle Shanahan the past two seasons with the Falcons.

”Bobby Turner’s been an assistant head coach for our teams we’ve had in the past and anytime that I need him to take over, he does,” Shanahan said. “So it depends what period it is, depends what we’re talking about.”

The 49ers opened organized team activities last week. It was the first time the 49ers’ rookies and veterans were together on the field for offense vs. defense practices. Shanahan said it takes some adjustment for him to figure out how to best budget his time during the workouts.

“I’m used to knowing exactly where to go and what to do and I always did that from an offensive coordinator standpoint which I still do a lot of those responsibilities,” Shanahan said. “So, at times, I feel most comfortable when I go to do that because that’s something to do. But, when I pass it over to some other guys and let them do it, I find myself walking around a lot and I’m not used to that.

“It feels awkward, but I don’t think it’s a bad thing. I think I should walk around and watch everyone and see it. I always see it on the tape, but that’s later at night. You want players to know you’re there and paying attention to everything and I usually try to cover that in meetings the next day also.”

Harbaugh goes Biblical, responds to Jacobs' criticisms of his coaching

Harbaugh goes Biblical, responds to Jacobs' criticisms of his coaching

Former NFL running back Brandon Jacobs spent one season with the San Francisco 49ers in 2012 under head coach Jim Harbaugh.

Jacobs only played in two games and gained seven yards on five carries. The results were nothing like his 5,087 yards and 60 touchdowns over eight years with the Giants. 

Apparently being pushed to the bench as a 31-year-old veteran running back didn't sit well with Jacobs. 

“Going somewhere where they don’t have route conversions into certain coverages was just absurd,” Jacobs said Thursday on the Tiki and Tierney Show. “They’re just running routes in the defense, getting people killed. Size and strength is what they had, and that’s why they won.

"Let’s be real. They had great assistant coaches, but Jim didn’t know what he was doing. Jim had no idea. Jim is throwing slants into Cover-2 safeties, getting people hurt. That guy knew nothing, man."

On Saturday morning, Harbaugh responded to Jacobs with a tweet to him. 

Harbaugh went 44-19-1 in four seasons as the 49ers' head coach. He also added five playoff wins and a trip to the Super Bowl in the 2012-13 season, the one that Jacobs played for him.