49ers

Perhaps the 49ers are not Baalke vs Lynch, but Old Jed vs New Jed

Perhaps the 49ers are not Baalke vs Lynch, but Old Jed vs New Jed

John Lynch has already established his hyperactivity bonafides, which is what fans want from their general managers. They want action, and Lynch has force-fed them all the action that can be rammed down a human gullet.
 
Now comes the other shoe – what it all means to the way the San Francisco 49ers view their place in the world.
 
As outlined by Comrade Maiocco in one of his more anal-retentive moments, Lynch has signed as many free agents in his first 31 hours on the job as Trent Baalke did in the opening week of his last five free agency periods.
 
In short, it took Lynch three percent of the time to achieve Baalke’s level of quantity – almost six percent if you allow for sleep, which given the current state of the 49ers’ need list is a luxury Lynch clearly cannot afford. 
 
The conundrum, of course, arises in assessing the motives for this difference. We can dismiss the efficacy of those moves based on the very simple fact that none of those players have even practiced, let alone played a game.
 
But is Lynch’s aggression a statement of style or opportunity? Does he attack roster issues like an overly sugared kindergarten class, or has Jed York made a complete break from the style he wanted from Baalke? Is Lynch just tackling a far more desperate organization than the one Baalke inherited, or has York changed his view on salary cap or draft choice hoarding?
 
The answer to all these questions is clearly yes, with a side of no. Kind of.
 
Lynch has been given a mandate to dynamite a collapsing structure and use the $99 million in dust-encrusted cap room to remake a desiccated football team. More to the point, he has been granted York’s expressed permission to operate with fury and purpose in ways that Baalke either could not or would not.
 
This isn’t unusual in sport – the next guy is typically radically different than the last guy was, because if the owner liked the way the last guy operated, there wouldn’t be a next guy.
 
But Lynch, who took the job with no personnel experience bar the fact that he was once personnel, is unhindered by York’s much-presumed reluctance to tap into the cap vault. He still has approximately $70-plus million in cap room (three of the 11 players, Brock Coyle, Don Jones and Aldrick Robinson, had not yet been entered into the cap list at this writing), which makes more signings more rather than less likely.
 
And he is doing so because (a) the roster desperately needs living things, and (b) because York is tired of being the star of his own citizens’ air force, and would like to be thought of as the owner who didn’t get in the way of progress rather than the owner who undid it.
 
It is probably too much to assume that Lynch will operate in this way again next year, though, because it is unlikely that he will have as much cap room available. Motive, after all, doesn’t work without opportunity.
 
But Baalke believed in draft choices on the theory that he was better at selecting new toys than ones that were slightly broken in. Draft choices are notoriously unreliable in a different way than free agents are, so Baalke’s theory worked only if he drafted well year in and year out.
 
He didn’t.
 
Lynch, on the other hand, is working with a shockingly threadbare pantry, and the most important thing (as in first of the most important things) he has to create is a roster structure, and structure can’t be created without players. He had only his smile and money to do so, so he used them – more the second than the first.
 
But it took York rethinking his own priorities for Lynch’s aggression to be permitted, and maybe that’s the real difference we are seeing here. Not Baalke v. Lynch, but Old Jed v. New Jed.
 
Now we will wait patiently while we see if Lynch is good at this thing, because if he isn’t, the next next guy will be a lot less active in the treacherous free agent market, and far more devoted to the treacherous draft market.
 
Because that’s just the way it works. Yesterday’s conservatism is today’s boldness, and today’s impetuousness is tomorrow’s prudence. It depends on who gets to pick the words.

Potential big play slips from Hoyer's grasp during preseason loss to Broncos

Potential big play slips from Hoyer's grasp during preseason loss to Broncos

SANTA CLARA – Quarterback Brian Hoyer threw the ball well enough to impress the Denver Broncos’ defensive backs during the 49ers’ two joint practices.

While he hit most of his passes on Saturday night, it was one that slipped away that summarized the 49ers’ 33-14 loss to the Broncos in the second exhibition game for both teams.

Hoyer had plenty of time to throw and saw a potential big play unfolding as he started to throw to wide receiver Jeremy Kerley. But the ball popped out of Hoyer’s right hand as he began to throw.

“I was getting ready to rip it to Kerley,” Hoyer said. “He had a double-move route, and I thought he was going to win. I went to throw it. And I was going to throw it hard, and literally, I think my arm even went forward and I was looking around, ‘What happened to the ball?' "

The ball ended up loose on the ground, where Broncos defensive lineman Shelby Harris recovered.

“My quarterbacks coach asked me, ‘When’s the last time that happened to you?’ Hoyer said. “Maybe a few years ago in practice, that happened one time. I never had that happen in a game. It’s the worst feeling. You go to throw the ball and you’re looking, and all of a sudden, you look around and you have no idea where it is.”

Hoyer and the 49ers passing game was sharp during two practice sessions with the Broncos during the week, prompting All-Pro defensive backs Aqib Talib and Chris Harris to praise the Hoyer, as well as coach Kyle Shanahan's offense.

Hoyer completed 8 of 11 pass attempts for 89 yards under the lights of Levi's Stadium. He threw an interception when 49ers receiver Marquise Goodwin juggled the ball and Denver defensive back Chris Lewis-Harris wrestled the ball away from him as they tumbled to the ground.

“There weren’t any reads on his 11 attempts that I was upset with,” Shanahan said of Hoyer.

“(On) his pick, Marquise has to catch that ball. He threw it to him. That keeps the drive alive. He just didn’t catch it clean and the DB made a good play. I wish Brian could’ve played longer to get a chance to get into some sort of rhythm.”

In the game, the 49ers committed 11 penalties for 86 yards and turned the ball over five times. Denver scored 27 points off those turnovers.

“I don’t think any of us should be pleased right now,” Hoyer said. “When you put the defense in that situation, regardless of whether it’s a regular-season game or a preseason game, you should feel displeased with the performance.”

Instant Analysis: Turnovers cost 49ers in preseason loss to Broncos

Instant Analysis: Turnovers cost 49ers in preseason loss to Broncos

BOX SCORE

SANTA CLARA – The 49ers don’t have to worry about peaking too soon, that’s for sure.

The 49ers first-team offense was plagued by turnovers and penalties against the Denver Broncos at Levi’s Stadium in the second exhibition game for both teams. And things did not get much better when the backups entered the action.

After two days during which the 49ers more than held their own against Denver in joint practices, there was no debate about which team was better when it was time for a game.

The 49ers put together an all-around sloppy performance -- low-lighted by 11 penalties and five turnovers -- in a 33-14 loss to the Broncos on Saturday night.

While the starters were in the game, the 49ers were outscored 10-0. The 49ers committed six penalties for 53 yards and committed four turnovers in the first half, as the 49ers fell behind 20-0 through two quarters.

“I thought the D did a solid job,” 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan said during his halftime interview on KPIX. “We put them in a bad situation four times, so I was happy that they just held it to what it was.”

Jaquiski Tartt was responsible for one of the giveaways when it was ruled he inadvertently touched the ball on a punt in the first quarter. The Broncos recovered the muffed punt to retain possession.

Quarterback Brian Hoyer lost a fumble when the ball slipped out of his hand as he was throwing. Hoyer was also tagged with an interception. Denver defensive back Chris Lewis-Harris ripped the ball away from Marquise Goodwin as he juggled a Hoyer pass that was thrown behind him.

Running back Tim Hightower lost a fumble in the second quarter.

The Broncos capitalized on those four turnovers for all 20 of their points while shutting out the 49ers through halftime.

The 49ers’ offense showed some signs of life with Hoyer at the controls. The team gained 111 yards on their 22 plays. Hoyer completed 8 of 11 passes for 89 yards before rookie quarterback C.J. Beathard replaced him late in the first half.

Beathard continued to make a strong case to win the backup job. Beathard is in competition with Matt Barkley as the 49ers’ No. 2 quarterback.

Beathard teamed up with his former Iowa teammate, tight end George Kittle, on a 29-yard touchdown pass in the third quarter. Kittle caught the short pass from Beathard, turned up the left sideline, ran through an attempted tackle by Lewis-Harris, then stiff-armed safety Orion Stewart en route to the end zone.

Beathard completed 7 of his 12 pass attempts for 110 yards. His passer rating was 116.7.

FOSTER, BOWMAN START
Linebackers Reuben Foster and NaVorro Bowman, who were limited in the 49ers’ final joint practice with Denver with shoulder ailments, started played 20 snaps apiece.

With Foster and Bowman on the field, the Broncos totaled just 63 yards of total offense. Bowman had two tackles, while Foster added one before the 49ers’ first-team defense was removed in the second quarter.

Foster underwent surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff in his right shoulder in February. Some NFL teams reportedly did not believe he would be available to play this season. He was cleared for full-contact drills on the eve of training camp.

The 49ers said Foster’s mild AC joint sprain in his right shoulder was not related to his previous injury. He was held out of contact drills on Thursday. Bowman was pulled out of practice Thursday with a similar condition.

SITTING IT OUT
Players who did not see action due to injuries were: Defensive linemen Aaron Lynch, DeForest Buckner and Ronald Blair, linebacker Sean Porter, defensive backs Will Redmond and Prince Charles Iworah, wide receiver Aaron Burbridge, and guard Joshua Garnett.

Jimmie Ward remains on physical unable to perform due to a hamstring injury. Ward could be activated when the 49ers return to practice.

THIS ‘N’ THAT
--Undrafted rookie Victor Bolden supplied one of the lone highlights for the 49ers with a 104-yard kickoff return late in the fourth quarter.

--Eli Harold started at the strongside linebacker in place of Ahmad Brooks, who entered the game in the second quarter with the second-team defense.

--Broncos quarterback Trevor Siemian connected with Jordan Taylor on a 19-yard touchdown pass against the coverage of newly signed 49ers cornerback Asa Jackson in the second quarter.

--Undrafted rookie Lorenzo Jerome started at free safety for the second game in a row. Jerome recorded two tackles and broke up a pass.

--Goodwin caught three passes for 44 yards. His first two receptions accounted for the first first downs from the 49ers’ No. 1 offense in the exhibition season.

--Rookie pass-rusher Pita Taumoepenu recorded a sack in the fourth quarter.

--The 49ers did not get much going from their top three running backs. Carlos Hyde gained 26 on eight carries. Kapri Bibbs had 6 yards on four carries. And Hightower had minus-1 yard on three attempts.

--Rookie running back Joe Williams entered the game with less than seven minutes to play. Guard Norman Price got blown back into the backfield on Williams second attempt, allowing Broncos defensive lineman Shelby Harris to, in essence, intercept the handoff from Barkley to Willliams.