Washington re-signs former 49ers TE Vernon Davis to three-year deal

Washington re-signs former 49ers TE Vernon Davis to three-year deal

WASHINGTON -- When Vernon Davis mentioned after his 11th NFL season that he'd like to play six more, it brought some laughs.

He wasn't kidding.

Davis believes he can play for more than another half-decade and took a big step toward that goal by re-signing with Washington on a three-year contract. The 33-year-old revealed the length of the deal on his Snapchat account late Tuesday night, and the team announced the new contract Wednesday morning.

The Washington native revitalized his career last season with Washington, starting 14 games and catching 44 passes for 583 yards and two touchdowns. In 11 seasons, the Maryland product has 505 receptions for 6,424 yards and 57 touchdowns.

"I felt like I just fell in love with the game all over again," he said.

Davis was traded from the San Francisco 49ers to the Denver Broncos in 2015 and won the Super Bowl as a complementary player. The Broncos let him go, allowing him to sign with Washington last year.

"I didn't think I had anything to prove," Davis said in January. "I know there was a lot of speculation about me being able to play the game still and a lot of people saying I was getting older and this and that. Of course that was fire. It fueled me to continue to go forward."

Davis posted a picture on Snapchat showing him on the phone and looking at his contract included the message, "A Redskin for three more years." He said he wanted to play for his hometown team coming out of college and was hoping Washington would draft him.

They never got the chance because San Francisco took him sixth overall in 2006. From there, Davis said his career included "peaks and valleys" and called returning to Washington a surreal experience.

After the season, Davis said he felt like he did back in 2007 or 2008 and wasn't as sore as in years past. His role was smaller than it was earlier in his career as Washington's No. 2 tight end behind Jordan Reed, but injuries to Reed pressed Davis into No. 1 duties at times.

Davis called it "probably one of the best seasons" of his career and said he'd love to finish it with Washington. He would be 35 at the end of the 2019 season if he finishes out this deal.

"I could probably play another six seasons if I continue to take care of myself, which I do," Davis said. "I'm enjoying the game, I'm playing ball and hopefully I can continue to get more opportunities next year and excel even more."

Reports: Former 49ers wide receiver to visit Bills

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AP

Reports: Former 49ers wide receiver to visit Bills

Aquan Boldin is looking for a new football home.

And the former 49ers wide receiver is visiting with the Bills on Monday, according to multiple reports.

Boldin started all 16 games with the Lions last season, recording 67 catches for 584 yards and eight touchdowns.

From 2013 to 2015 with the 49ers, he racked up 237 receptions, 3030 receiving yards and 16 touchdowns.

The three-time Pro Bowler will turn 37 years old in October.

Boldin entered the NFL as the 54th overall pick in the 2003 draft.

Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

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Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

There is no shortage of blame to go around for the Atlanta Falcons’ collapse in Super Bowl 51.

The Falcons built a 28-3 lead in the middle of the third quarter and let it slip away, ultimately falling to the New England Patriots, 34-28, in overtime.

Matt Ryan voiced one previously undisclosed factor in the collapse this week in an interview with Pete Prisco of CBS Sports, pointing the finger at the new coach of the 49ers.

Kyle Shanahan has been the focus of a lot of the blame, but critique from the league MVP was a new one.

The Falcons quarterback faulted his former offensive coordinator for taking too much time to relay the play calls. Ryan said he did not have enough time to change any of the plays – presumably checking out of called pass plays to run the ball.

Here’s what Ryan told Prisco:

"Kyle's play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in. As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you're talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, 'There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.' You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.

"With the way Kyle's system was set up, he took more time to call plays and we shift and motion a lot more than we did with (former coordinator) Dirk (Koetter). You couldn't get out of stuff like that. We talk about being the most aggressive team in football. And I'm all for it. But there's also winning time. You're not being aggressive not running it there."

The 49ers can point to mismanagement of the clock for their own Super Bowl heartbreak. The 49ers’ offense had the perfect play call at the perfect time against the Baltimore Ravens late in Super Bowl XLVII.

But with the play clock striking :00, coach Jim Harbaugh was forced to call a timeout from the sideline. A split-second later, the ball was snapped and it appeared the quarterback run would have easily ended up with Colin Kaepernick in the end zone.

Much like after the 49ers’ loss, the Falcons left plenty of room for second-guessing.

Two of Shanahan’s plays calls, which directly led to the collapse, will forever be scrutinized.

The first came with 8:31 remaining in regulation and the Falcons holding a 28-12 lead. On third and 1 from the Atlanta 36, Shanahan did not remain conservative with an expected run play. He swung for the fence.

Receiver Aldrick Robinson, whom the 49ers added this offseason as a free-agent pickup, was breaking free past the Patriots secondary for what could have been a touchdown. But just as Ryan was unloading, New England linebacker Dont’a Hightower hit him and forced the fumble. Running back Devonta Freeman whiffed on blitz pickup, which would have provided Ryan with enough time to target Robinson deep.

Ryan’s explanation does not appear applicable on this play, though. In watching the replay, the Falcons broke the huddle with more than 25 seconds remaining on the play clock and the snap occurred with :15 to spare.

The other questionable sequence came after the Falcons – leading by eight points -- got to the New England 22-yard line with less than five minutes to play. The Falcons lost 1 yard on a run play on first down.

On second down, Ryan was sacked for a 12-yard loss. Before that play, the Falcons broke the huddle with :19 on the play clock. The snap occurred with :04 remaining. The game clock was running, so the Falcons had reason to attempt to burn as much clock as possible.

In the fourth quarter, the Falcons never seemed rushed to get off a play. The closest they came to delay-of-game penalties were when they snapped the ball with :04 on the one play and :03 another time. The majority of their snaps occurred with :10 or more seconds to spare.

If the Falcons were guilty of anything when it came to the play clock, it was that the offense did not waste more time. After New England pulled to within 28-9 late in the third quarter, the Falcons ran only six offensive plays while the game clock was running.

On those six plays, the Falcons snapped the ball with :13, :09, :14, :20, :13 and :04 remaining on the play clock. If they’d snapped the ball with one second remaining each time, they could have shortened the game by 1 minute, 7 seconds. The Patriots scored the game-tying touchdown with :57 remaining in regulation.