49ers

Why the 49ers should follow Rams' lead with uniform makeover

Why the 49ers should follow Rams' lead with uniform makeover

While the rest of FootballWorld is locked into the detritus of the NFL Combine (Leonard Fournette is fat until he goes to the bathroom! Christian McCaffrey a very fast runner and a bad furniture mover! The Philadelphia Eagles won a coin flip!), the real news from this week came from Los Angeles, where the Rams have decided to turn back the clock on their own heads.

Well, on their helmets, anyway.

They are abandoning the gold horns on the helmet for solely cosmetic reasons and replacing them white horns, as their forbears did in the 1960s and early ‘70s. They say it’s a throwback to the glory days, but (a) the glory days lasted eight years and the team lost their only two playoff games in that time, and (b) they didn’t change the jerseys, which still have that dismal gold.

So why should you care?

Well, if you’re a Raider fan, you shouldn’t care at all, since your own team hasn’t had a uniform makeover since 1964, save the one season they tried silver numerals on the road uniforms.

But then there are the 49ers, whose original colors weren’t red and gold but red and white, and whose original logo was the Dancing Gun-Totin’ Prospector. Given that uniform makeovers always go best after a dreadful year or years, it is hard to see how the 49ers couldn’t have considered a similarly retrograde look.

Oh, you devotedly faithful will tell us that the 49ers’ makeover was in the front office with John Lynch and Kyle Shanahan, but that only flies so far. The Rams fired longtime head coach Jeff Fisher and replaced him with Sean McVay, who is seven years younger than Jed York, and they still felt compelled to tidy up in search of new sales.

And yes, you can make the point that the Rams were playing before almost nobody last year in the first season in Los Angeles. But you have also seen the vast expanses of empty seats in Santa Clara, haven’t you? What makes that different?

This seems like a small matter compared to the fact that the 49ers met with North Carolina quarterback Mitch Trubisky today to get the cut of his jib, draftwise. But given that this is the season where everyone lies to everyone at every opportunity for every conceivable reason, anything you hear about him, them, or the meeting itself will be a festival of false.

So why not a hastily considered makeover just to move some product until Shanalynch fixes everything you really care about?

There is still the red, which is the principal color except when the 49ers decided to go all black in an attempt to cash in on the ninja craze. The gold looks nice enough, but it looked a lot better on Montana, Rice and Lott than it did Kaepernick, Smith and Reid.

And best of all, it brings back the prospector so that we can then agitate for the end of Sourdough Sam for reasons of redundancy.

We grant you here that the guns in the logo could be problematic for reasons of public relations, but remember that this is a league that still doesn’t mind Washington’s nickname. Or maybe you are troubled by the prospector’s angry face, ignoring that the last smiling mascot in NFL history was the 1969 Denver Broncos, and in that one the football player is standing on the horse’s back while wearing cleats, which is animal cruelty by any measure.

But the opportunity is probably lost, because a change now would make it look like York is reacting to Stan Kroenke, and reactionary behavior is what got the 49ers into the mess they’re in now.

And that’s too bad because as we hurtle back to the 1950s in so many different ways, the 49ers are missing a bet. Basic colors, a hearkening back to good old days that really weren’t, an angry prospector firing away at no discernible target below his feet . . . how does this not make perfect sense in these perilous times?

But if it helps, the Trubisky talks went well. Reportedly.

Despite injury concerns, Foster, Bowman play 20 snaps in exhibition vs Broncos

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AP

Despite injury concerns, Foster, Bowman play 20 snaps in exhibition vs Broncos

SANTA CLARA -- Rookie linebacker Reuben Foster, who was limited in Thursday’s practice due to a shoulder sprain, started the 49ers’ exhibition game Saturday night against the Denver Broncos at Levi's Stadium.

Foster played 20 snaps and recorded one tackle before the 49ers’ first-team defense was removed in the second quarter.

There were some concerns when Foster was included on the 49ers’ pre-practice injury report Thursday with an injury to his surgically repaired shoulder. But the 49ers said the injury was not related to the torn rotator cuff he sustained for Alabama in the national semifinal game against Washington.

NaVorro Bowman, who was removed from practice Thursday with a similar shoulder condition, also started and played every snap alongside Foster. Bowman was credited with two tackles.

With Foster and Bowman on the field, the Broncos totaled just 63 yards of total offense.

New York City law enforcement members hold rally to support Kaepernick

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USATSI

New York City law enforcement members hold rally to support Kaepernick

NEW YORK — A former New York City police officer, whose claims of police corruption in the 1970s were chronicled in an Al Pacino movie, joined dozens of current and former officers Saturday at a rally in support of getting quarterback Colin Kaepernick a job in the National Football League.

The former San Francisco 49ers player became a controversial figure last year after he refused to stand for the national anthem in what he called a protest against oppression of people of color.

He opted out of his contract in March and became a free agent, but so far, no NFL teams have signed him for the upcoming season.

The gathering in Brooklyn featured about 75 mostly minority officers wearing black T-shirts reading "#imwithkap."

One exception was retired officer Frank Serpico, whose exploits were featured in the 1973 film, "Serpico."

He admitted not being a football fan, but said he felt it was important to support Kaepernick for his stance.

"He's trying to hold up this government up to our founding fathers," said the now 81-year-old Serpico.

Sgt. Edwin Raymond, who said he was heading to work after the rally, spoke of the need for racial healing in the country.

"Until racism in America is no longer taboo, we own up to it, we admit it, we understand it and then we do what we have to do to solve it, unfortunately we're going to have these issues," he said.