49ers

York: 49ers do not expect short-term benefits from Raiders' move to Vegas

York: 49ers do not expect short-term benefits from Raiders' move to Vegas

PHOENIX – CEO Jed York said he does not expect the Raiders’ move to Las Vegas to have a significant short-term benefit for the 49ers.

After all, there appears to be a clear delineation between the two fan bases.

“The easy thing to say is this is a great financial gain for the 49ers, which just isn’t the case,” York said from the NFL owners meetings on the 49ers Insider Podcast.

The Raiders moved from Oakland to Los Angeles in 1982, leaving the 49ers as the only NFL act in the Bay Area for 13 seasons. During that time the 49ers won four Super Bowls. But there were few tangible benefits to the 49ers that were directly associated with the Raiders' absence from the market.

“You did not see a huge increase in ticket revenue, sponsorship revenue, even in terms of overall exposure in the market, because I think Raiders fans and 49ers fans are just a different group of folks,” York said. “The Raiders fans aren’t necessarily loyal to a certain geographic location. They’re loyal to the Raiders. I think you’ll see those fans follow the Raiders to Las Vegas.”

York said “20-plus percent” of the 49ers’ season-ticket holders live in Alameda County. He said the only change he envisions would be the expansion of some of the 49ers’ philanthropic efforts to some of the East Bay’s underserved communities.

The 49ers’ home, Levi’s Stadium, was built with the design of accommodating two home teams. While the NFL might have preferred the 49ers and Raiders to forge a relationship with a shared stadium, like the New York Giants and Jets, the Raiders never seriously considered a move to the South Bay.

“We had the conversation with Mark (Davis), but when the stadium was up and running in Santa Clara, and Levi’s was really going, it really is the 49ers’ stadium,” York said. “I think there was a little hesitancy of truly being a tenant in somebody else’s stadium, which certainly makes sense that it wasn’t high on their priority list.”

The Raiders figure to remain in the Bay Area for three seasons until their new home in Southern Nevada is ready for NFL action. The Raiders have a lease at the Oakland Coliseum for the 2017 and ’18 seasons. Davis expressed a preference to extend the lease to 2019.

The 49ers would be open to discussing the possibility of the Raiders’ use of Levi’s Stadium – seemingly as a last resort for both sides.

“If that was an opportunity, we’d certainly sit down and discuss it,” York said. “But I think there are a lot of moving pieces right now and it’s really conjecture to talk about 2019 at this point when they’d still obviously prefer to stay at the Coliseum.”

Paraag Marathe: I understand if 49ers fans say, 'How come he's been there?'

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USATI

Paraag Marathe: I understand if 49ers fans say, 'How come he's been there?'

Paraag Marathe is entering his 17th year with the 49ers.

Back in mid-January, Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk wrote the following:

The impediment to attracting their preferred candidates isn’t owner Jed York; apparently, it’s Chief Strategy Officer and EVP of Football Operations Paraag Marathe.

On Tuesday morning, Marathe joined The Murph & Mac Show on KNBR 680 and was asked about combating those kinds of claims.

"I've got a lot of great relationships in this league and a lot of great friends in this league ... all I can do is do the best job that I can and focus on what I think is right," Marathe said. "And know that the sun rises and the sun sets and just focus on that."

Has Marathe had to train himself to develop thick skin?

[REWIND: Marathe: My job is to stay in my lane, help the coach and GM]

"Sure it's frustrating, right? But at the same time, I gotta say I get it, too," he answered. "We've had a lot of turnover, we haven't had winning seasons recently and I'm one of the one constants. I've been here.

"I'm not just an employee here. I'm also a fan of the team. I have been my whole life. So I get it. I understand fans' frustrations. If I was a fan and I didn't know, I would also say, 'Hey, well Paraag's been here the whole time. How come he's been there? What's he have to do with it?'

"I get that, too. Ultimately, we're judged on wins and losses and I'm a part of that. And hopefully I'm a part of the solution of getting this thing turned around."

As NBC Sports Bay Area's Matt Maiocco wrote back in February:

A year ago, Marathe officially was replaced as team president and became the 49ers’ chief strategy officer and executive vice president of football operations. His duties with the football team have not changed.

In fact, York and Marathe roles with the organization took on a much-greater significance after the decision was made to fire coach Chip Kelly and general manager Trent Baalke.

49ers WR Goodwin accepts one-year track suspension, issues statement

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AP

49ers WR Goodwin accepts one-year track suspension, issues statement

SANTA CLARA – The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency announced Tuesday 49ers wide receiver Marquise Goodwin, a member of the 2012 Olympic Track and Field team, has accepted a one-year suspension for failing to properly file and maintain his whereabouts information.

The 49ers announced Goodwin will not be subject to discipline under the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancing substances.

“Marquise informed our organization quite some time ago that he has no intentions of competing in track and field and has been entirely focused on his football career for more than a year,” 49ers announced in a statement. “We have been in touch with the League office regarding this matter, and understand that Marquise will not be subject to discipline under the NFL Policy on Performance-Enhancing Substances as a result of USADA's decision.”

Goodwin, 26, is a member of the USADA Registered Testing Pool, which consists of athletes subject to certain “whereabouts” requirements in order to be located for out-of-competition testing, according to the USADA. During a span of 12 months, Goodwin had three “whereabouts” failures.

Goodwin’s one-year period of ineligibility began on April 1, 2017, the date of his third failure in a 12-month period.

In 2012, Goodwin won the long jump competition the NCAA championships and at the U.S. Olympic Trials, becoming the first collegian since 1960 to accomplish that feat. He finished 10th at the London Olympics.

He returned to the sport last year to attempt to qualify for the Olympics for a second time. After posting world-best jumps after the football season, his Olympic quest ended at the U.S. Trials with a seventh-place finish while battling a sore hamstring.

In a May interview with NBC Sports Bay Area, Goodwin was noncommittal about whether he will try to return to the Olympics in 2020, when he would be 30 years old.

Goodwin released a statement through the 49ers:

“Never in my life have I failed a test. I have never been opposed to testing and, in fact, have always been compliant with each and every protocol and policy associated with my competitive career in track and field.

More than a year ago, I decided to cease competing in the sport in order to concentrate 100 percent on my NFL career. Therefore, I discontinued all practices associated with competing in track and field, including submitting my ‘Whereabouts’ information.

It appears that because I did not inform USADA of my plans, my name was inadvertently included in their 2017 testing pool.

I greatly appreciate the support of the San Francisco 49ers and the National Football League as I work to clarify this matter.”