Young, Allen among first-time eligible HOF nominees

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Young, Allen among first-time eligible HOF nominees

Former 49ers defensive tackle Bryant Young and offensive guard Larry Allen, who played his final two NFL seasons with San Francisco, are among a group of 13 first-time eligible nominees for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.In all, the Pro Football Hall of Fame announced the list of 127 nominees for the Hall of Fame.Young played his entire 14-year career with the 49ers. He was named to the Pro Bowl four times.Allen, who played college football at Sonoma State, was an 11-time Pro Bowl player, including 2006 with the 49ers. He played his first 12 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys.Nose tackle Ted Washington, who played the first three seasons of his 15-year career with the 49ers, is also eligible for the first time.The Class of 2013 will be selected from the list, plus senior nominees nose tackle Curley Culp (Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Oilers) and linebacker Dave Robinson (Green Bay Packers and Washington Redskins) who were selected last month by the Hall of Fames Senior Selection Committee.The actual voting for the Class of 2013 will be held on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 -- the day before Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans, La.The Class of 2013 list of modern-era nominees includes 89 players, 14 coaches and 24 contributors, including former 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr.Among the other nominees who played for the 49ers are Roger Craig, Ricky Watters, Charles Haley, Charles Mann and Gary Anderson.FIRST-YEAR ELIGIBLE NOMINEES
Quarterback Steve McNair
Running Back Priest Holmes
Wide Receiver Keenan McCardell
Offensive Linemen Larry Allen (G), Tom Nalen (C), Jonathan Ogden (T)
Defensive Linemen Sam Adams (DT), Warren Sapp (DT), Michael Strahan (DE), Ted Washington (DTNT), Bryant Young (DE)
Defensive Back John Lynch (S)
Kicker Morten AndersenADDITIONAL NOMINEES
Quarterbacks Drew Bledsoe, Randall Cunningham, Ron Jaworski, Neil Lomax, Phil Simms, Danny White (also P)
Running Backs Jamal Anderson, Ottis Anderson, Tiki Barber, Jerome Bettis, Larry Centers, Roger Craig, Stephen Davis, Terrell Davis, Eddie George, Brian Mitchell (also PRKR), Gerald Riggs, Herschel Walker, Ricky Watters
Wide Receivers Tim Brown (also KR), Cris Carter, Gary Clark, Mark Clayton, Henry Ellard (also PR), Keyshawn Johnson, Stanley Morgan, Andre Reed, Sterling Sharpe, Jimmy Smith, Rod Smith
Tight Ends Todd Christensen, Ben Coates
Offensive Linemen Tony Boselli (T), Lomas Brown (T), Jim Covert (T), Joe Fields (C), Bill Fralic (GT), Jeff Hartings (GC), Jay Hilgenberg (C), Chris Hinton (GT), Kent Hull (C),Joe Jacoby (T), Mike Kenn (T), Jim Lachey (T), Will Shields (G), Erik Williams (T), Steve Wisniewski (G)
Defensive Linemen Carl Hairston (DEDT), Charles Haley (DELB), Ed Too Tall Jones (DE), Joe Klecko (DEDTNT), Dexter Manley (DE), Charles Mann (DE), Fred Smerlas (NT)
Linebackers Cornelius Bennett, Kevin Greene (also DE), Ken Harvey, Clay Matthews, Karl Mecklenburg, Sam Mills, Darryl Talley
Defensive Backs Eric Allen (CB), Steve Atwater (S), Joey Browner (S), LeRoy Butler (S), Nolan Cromwell (S), Albert Lewis (CB), Dennis Smith (S), Troy Vincent (CB), Everson Walls (CB), Aeneas Williams (CBS), Darren Woodson (S)
PuntersKickers Gary Anderson (K), Sean Landeta (P), Nick Lowery (K)
Special TeamsPosition Player Steve Tasker (also WR)
Coaches Bill Arnsparger, Doug Blevins, Bud Carson, Don Coryell, Bill Cowher, Tom Flores, Jimmy Johnson, Chuck Knox, Bill Parcells, Buddy Parker, Dan Reeves, Marty Schottenheimer, Clark Shaughnessy, Dick Vermeil
Contributors K. S. (Bud) Adams, Jr., George Anderson, Bobby Beathard, Gil Brandt, C. O. Brocato, Leo Carlin, Jack Kent Cooke, Otho Davis, Ed DeBartolo, Jr., Ron Gibbs, Ralph Kohl, Eddie Kotal, Robert Kraft, Art McNally, Art Modell, Bill Polian, Art Rooney, Jr., Steve Sabol, Carl Storck, Paul Tagliabue, Burl Toler, Sr., Jim Tunney, Ron Wolf, George Young On 2012 finalists list

Uh-oh: Is Kyle Shanahan going to be Harbaugh-tastic in his timing?

Uh-oh: Is Kyle Shanahan going to be Harbaugh-tastic in his timing?

Until now, Kyle Shanahan’s hiring by the San Fracisco 49ers looked great because of his two-and-a-half predecessors – the last days of Jim Harbaugh, the misplaced concept of Jim Tomsula and the couldn’t-make-chicken-marsala-out-of-old-Kleenex problems surrounding Chip Kelly.

But now, Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan has told us all that Shanahan has a gift we in the Bay Area know all too well. Specifically, that Shanahan took too long to call plays to the Super Bowl the Falcons vomited up to the New England Patriots.

Now who does that remind you of, over and over again?

Yes, some things are evergreen, and too many options in this overly technological age seems to be one of them. Data in is helpful, but command going out is what bells the cow. Ryan said Shanahan was, well, almost Harbaugh-tastic in his timing.

“Kyle’s play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in,” Ryan told Bleacher Report. “As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you’re talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, ‘There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.’ You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.

“With the way Kyle's system was set up, he took more time to call plays and we shift and motion a lot more than we did with (former coordinator) Dirk (Koetter). You couldn't get out of stuff like that. We talk about being the most aggressive team in football. And I'm all for it. But there's also winning time. You’re not being aggressive not running it there.”

And the reason this matters is because the Atlanta Shanahan had multiple good options on every play. In San Francsco, at least in the short term, he’ll be dealing with minimal options. That could speed up his choices, as in “What the hell, we don’t have Julio Jones.” But it could also mean more delays, as in, “Okay, him . . . no, maybe not . . . no, he just screwed up that play last series . . . oh, damn it, time out!”

In short, it’s growing pains season here, children. On the field, on the sidelines, and maybe even in Kyle Shanahan’s head.

49ers defense: Top training camp competitions

49ers defense: Top training camp competitions

Before starting six games as a rookie, Rashard Robinson had not played football since the 2014 season at LSU.

Yet, Robinson is the closest thing to a sure bet to win a starting job among 49ers cornerbacks.

Tramaine Brock was projected as the starting cornerback on the other side until his arrest on suspicion of a troubling domestic incident prompted the 49ers to release him more than three months ago.

The 49ers open training camp next week, and here are the top competitions for starting jobs on defense:

LEFT CORNERBACK
Keith Reaser has yet to make an NFL start while appearing in 28 games the past two seasons. The 49ers rotated cornerbacks with the first-team defense during the offseason program, and Reaser put himself in position to enter camp as the slight favorite to replace Brock.

Veterans Dontae Johnson and Will Davis will try to work their way into the picture. And the 49ers are hopeful talented rookie Ahkello Witherspoon will develop a willingness to play with more physicality. The 49ers selected Witherspoon in the third round. He has the size and all the tools to win the starting job, but there were times in college he showed an alarming lack of aggression as a tackler.

NICKELBACK
K'Waun Williams is healthy after missing last season due to an ankle injury and falling out of favor with the Cleveland Browns. Defensive backs coach Jeff Hafley, one of the few holdovers from Chip Kelly’s staff, thinks highly of Williams after coaching him with the Browns. Hafley said he believes Williams can become one of the top covermen in the slot in the entire league.

Williams lined up with the first-team defense throughout the offseason program. His biggest competition could come from Will Redmond, whom the 49ers selected in the third round of the 2016 draft but did not play as a rookie due to a knee injury. Redmond has some rust to knock off, but he did not appear to show signs of the injury during the offseason program.

RIGHT DEFENSIVE END
Arik Armstead is not the prototypical player at the “Leo” position. At 6 foot 7, Armstead does not have the low center of gravity that is typically associated with that position. But Armstead is certainly not lacking for athleticism.

The 49ers need a more consistent pass rush to assist their unproven cornerbacks, and this spot will be counted upon to provide more pressure on opposing quarterbacks.

Veteran Elvis Dumervil, who believes he has regained his explosion off the edge after being hampered with Achilles injury, was added last month to do what he does best. Dumervil, 33, enters the season with 99 career sacks.

Aaron Lynch is on notice as he enters his fourth NFL season. He moves from outside linebacker to defensive end in the 49ers’ new 4-3 scheme. Multiple competitions will be ongoing at this position, as the 49ers will look to determine the best fits for base downs, as well as passing situations.

WEAKSIDE LINEBACKER
The signing of free-agent Malcolm Smith raised a few eyebrows. It was just the offseason program, but Smith was as impressive as any player on the team during the non-padded practices. He is clearly comfortable in Robert Saleh’s scheme, which is based on the Seattle Seahawks’ defense.

The 49ers had Reuben Foster rated as their No. 3 prospect in the entire draft. They traded with the Seahawks to move up to select him at No. 31 overall. The 49ers seem thoroughly unconcerned with Foster’s shoulder. The club believes he will be medically cleared for the opening of training camp.

The 49ers might want to bring Foster along slowly, but it is clear they do not expect him to be a backup for very long.