...and this man is going to replace him

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...and this man is going to replace him

From Comcast SportsNetSTORRS, Conn. (AP) -- Kevin Ollie can win as many games, even as many national championships, as his predecessor and former coach did at Connecticut. But he can't transform the program. Jim Calhoun did that already.During his 26 seasons in Storrs, Calhoun turned a regional New England program into a powerhouse, becoming one of just five coaches to win three national titles or more. Add to that seven Big East tournament crowns and 10 regular-season championships. No wonder the 10,000 seats were usually filled at Gampel Pavilion, the arena Calhoun gets credit for building.All those accomplishments are history now. What's left are high expectations for a rookie coach.Ollie, who played for Calhoun from 1991-95, went on to a long NBA career and returned two years ago as an assistant, took over Thursday -- a choice Calhoun fully supported."Simply put, he epitomizes what we want our students to be about," Calhoun said. "When I started here we felt we could do anything and I feel that way now, everything's in place. This is an exciting time as we go forward."And a difficult one. He takes over a team that is banned from the Big East and NCAA tournaments because of poor academic performances.With a one-year contract, Ollie won't have much time to show what he can do on the bench and on the recruiting trail. And his depleted roster isn't likely to add to Calhoun's stellar numbers -- 27 players selected in the NBA draft, including 13 lottery picks."We're going to attack this thing head on," Ollie said at a news conference at Gampel, where he once thrilled UConn crowds with his hustle and defense. "We have enough to do it. Coach will be there right beside me as he has always been. He's been a second father to me from the day I arrived here as a recruit and believe me, that won't change."Ollie's contract will pay him a prorated 384,615 and ends on April 4, the last day of the 2012-13 basketball season.Athletic director Warde Manuel said there's a reason it's a single-year deal."I like to win and Kevin does, too. We're not here just to participate in games," Manuel said. "I'm looking to see how he is on the sideline. How he handles decision-making, substitutions, things that are normal in a game. How does he handle losses with the team and motivate them the next day to come back and play?"It truly is a long-term plan, but I want to see where Kevin is before we extend that contract. The commitment is there. He knows it."Ollie refused to get caught up in the discussion."Everything I've done has prepared me for sliding over into that chair," he said. "I'm going to coach this team like I've got a 10-, 15-year contract. I hope it's for a lifetime. I want to retire one day from the University of Connecticut like Jim Calhoun did."Ollie will have some familiar faces on the bench since all four assistants are staying."Kevin has always been a great listener," associate head coach George Blaney said. "He's a potential superstar as a coach, no doubt about that. Sure he'll be different than Jim, but there was only one Jim Calhoun."Several former UConn players were there to see one of their own become coach.Kemba Walker, who led UConn to the national championship with an incredible 11-game run in 2010-11, isn't worried in the least."He's one of the toughest guys I know," said Walker, who plays for the Charlotte Bobcats. "Kevin's UConn just like Coach is UConn. It's not one person here. It's everybody who played here. We are a family and it will stay that way."Connecticut has never faced a season like this one.It will have its first new head coach in 26 years and he is only guaranteed seven months on the job. There are only five players returning who saw significant playing time last season. There will be no postseason play at all. Those factors should make the job as tough as any faced by a coach in Division I.Don't tell that to Ollie."I told my players this morning, It's all stairs now. No escalators,' ' he said. "Escalators are for cowards. Every day now will be one step at a time."

Source: Giants trade Chris Heston to Mariners

Source: Giants trade Chris Heston to Mariners

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — Faced with a crowded depth chart and a need for a roster spot, the Giants shipped right-hander Chris Heston to Seattle on Wednesday night, a source confirmed to CSNBayArea.com.

Heston, who made 31 starts and threw a no-hitter for the Giants in 2015, would have been designated for assignment had a deal not gotten done. The Giants will receive a player to be named later, per MLB Network’s Jon Heyman. The move clears a 40-man roster spot for closer Mark Melancon, who signed Monday. 

Heston, 28, filled in after injuries to veterans in 2015 and posted a 3.95 ERA and 12 wins, one of which was a no-hitter in New York. He was a first-half savior for an unhealthy staff, going 9-5 with a 3.39 ERA in 18 starts before the All-Star break. The long season caught up to Heston down the stretch, and the Giants filled their rotation that December with free agents Johnny Cueto and Jeff Samardzija. 

Heston made just four appearances in 2016 after being moved to the bullpen. It was a transition that didn't quite take, and he ended up back in the minors, making 14 starts for the River Cats as he worked to regain some of the velocity that was lost when he dropped 15 pounds during offseason workouts. An oblique injury led to Heston being put on the 60-day DL in June and ultimately ended his season. 

This represents a needed fresh start for Heston, who was hopelessly blocked in the Giants’ system. The Giants acquired Matt Moore at the deadline and Ty Blach and Matt Cain will compete for the final rotation spot. Veteran Albert Suarez and top pitching prospect Tyler Beede are among the starters who had jumped ahead of Heston. In Seattle, he joins a team in need of starting depth, and he should get a shot to return to a big league rotation.

Marshall: Fuzzy memory of first meeting with Ward due to painkillers

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AP

Marshall: Fuzzy memory of first meeting with Ward due to painkillers

SANTA CLARA – Wide receiver Brandon Marshall supplied 49ers defensive back Jimmie Ward with the first learning experience of his NFL career early in his rookie season.

Ward has a vivid memory of the game – just his second in the NFL – and the three touchdowns passes Marshall caught on him to lead the Chicago Bears to a 28-20 victory over the 49ers in the first regular-season game played at Levi’s Stadium.

But Marshall, now a member of the New York Jets, admitted Wednesday to having a fuzzy recollection of that game due to painkillers he was prescribed in order to play in the game. Marshall, an 11-year NFL veteran, was in his third and final season with the Bears.

“Well, I don’t really remember much about that game because, uh, I worked really hard to get back from a high-ankle (sprain) . . . I don’t want to go there,” Marshall said, beginning to laugh on a conference call with Bay Area reporters.

“I’ll say it: I took a couple pain pills, so . . . I took a couple of pain pills to mask the pain. I really wasn’t supposed to play. I came back from a high ankle, you know, within 10 days. I was supposed to be out four-to-six weeks. So I don’t remember much from that game. I just remember catching those balls. That was pretty much it.”

Marshall was listed as questionable for the game. On the day of the game, ESPN reported, citing a source, that there was a "75 percent" chance neither Marshall nor Alshon Jeffery (hamstring) would play. Both receivers played in the game.

Marshall had five receptions for 48 yards with touchdown catches of 17, 5 and 3 yards while being matched in the slot against Ward, the 49ers’ first-round pick in that year’s draft. That game served as a study guide for Ward.

“Yeah, I watched it a lot,” Ward said. “It was my welcome-to-the-NFL game. Just looking forward to going against Brandon Marshall for the second time in my career.”

Ward will undoubtedly see plenty of Marshall on Sunday when the 49ers face the Jets on Sunday at Levi’s Stadium. Marshall may not remember much from facing Ward two seasons ago, but he said he has been impressed with what he sees on film.

“I think he’s really tough,” Marshall said. “He’s tough and he’s crafty and savvy. This is a guy that seems to really study the game and understands his opponent. If you go out there and give him the same release two or three times in a row, nine times out of 10, he’s going to get the best of you. We have to do a better job than him this week of studying film and trying to outwork him mentally.”

Marshall’s revelation that his memory of the 2014 game against the 49ers is clouded due to the use of painkillers comes at a time when Warriors coach Steve Kerr last week said on the Warriors Insider Podcast that he tried marijuana in hopes it would provide relief during the back issues that forced him to take a leave of absence of nearly four months.

“I’m not a pot person; it doesn’t agree with me,” Kerr told CSN Bay Area’s Monte Poole. “I’ve tried it a few times, and it did not agree with me at all. So I’m not the expert on this stuff. But I do know this: If you’re an NFL player, in particular, and you’ve got a lot of pain, I don’t think there is any question that pot is better for your body than Vicodin. And yet athletes everywhere are prescribed Vicodin like it’s Vitamin C, like it’s no big deal.”

When asked for his stance on whether the NFL should reconsider its position to include marijuana as a banned substance, Marshall received some direction from a Jets public-relations employee who could be heard in the background of the call saying that Marshall “knows better than that.”

But Marshall answered the question, saying that he wants to learn more about the subject.

“I do not have a stance on that," Marshall said. "That is something that I actually want to research more this offseason when I have time. I’m not a guy that knows about the benefits of what it can do for pain and other things. But I’d like to hear others’ opinions and really research the effects it can have on us -- positives and negatives.”