Corky Black wins CSN's All-Star Teacher Award


Corky Black wins CSN's All-Star Teacher Award

June 11, 2011

COMCAST SPORTSNET ANNOUNCES WINNEROF 2011 ALL-STAR TEACHER AWARD Robert Corky Black of Oak Grove High School, San Jose, CA Named 2011 All-Star Teacher,20,000 Check for His School Presented in His HonorEachAll-Star Teacher Award Runner-Up to Receive 2,000 for HisHer School SAN FRANCISCO, CA Comcast SportsNet, the home of Authentic Bay Area Sports,announced today that Robert Corky Black of Oak Grove High School in San Jose is the winner of the2011 All-Star Teacher Award and has been presented a 20,000 check for his school.This year,Comcast SportsNet teamed with Provident Credit Union to increase the grand prize for the winning teachers school, up from 10,000 in past years. EachAll-Star Teacher Award runner-up will receive 2,000 for hisher school.Ted Griggs, Vice President and General Manager, Comcast SportsNet Bay Area; Heidi Parks, Provident Credit Union Vice President of Marketing; Rachelle Chong, Comcast California Regional Vice President of Government Affairs; and San Francisco Giants pitcher Jeremy Affeldt presented Black the 20,000 check during an on-field ceremony prior to this evenings San Francisco GiantsCincinnati Reds game at AT&T Park. Comcast SportsNet and Provident Credit Union are honored to name Robert Black the 2011 All-Star Teacherand to present him a 20,000 check for Oak Grove High School, said Ted Griggs, Vice President and General Manager, Comcast SportsNet Bay Area. Mr. Black has demonstrated tireless dedication and loyalty to his school and community, and thanks to his commitment he has been able to help shape the lives of his young students. We would also like to recognize and thank the other finalists and all the award nominees for their invaluable contributions to their students and communities.Heidi Parks, Vice President of Marketing, Provident Credit Union, stated, Provident Credit Union is honored to take part in such an amazing award that recognizes the tireless efforts of teachers within our community. All of the finalists demonstrated such a high level of dedication to their students' education, and they are all to be commended. On behalf of all Provident members, we congratulate Mr. Black on his achievement. TheAll-Star Teacher Award was created to recognize middle and high school teachers in Northern California who go above and beyond to inspire their students and community. An esteemed panel of community leaders selected five finalists based on four categories: Overall Commitment, Excellence in Teaching, Rapport with Students, and Level of Distinction. This years five finalists were Robert Corky Black of Oak Grove High School (San Jose, CA);Stefanie Blanco of James Lick High School (San Jose, CA); Victor Doan of San Leandro High School (San Leandro, CA); Ken Klieman of Bowditch Middle School (Foster City, CA); and Tony Manno of Alameda High School (Alameda, CA).Members of the public voted for the All-Star Teacher finalists from April 18 to June 5 by voting online at and 2007, Michael Meneses of Presidio Middle School in San Francisco, CA was the inauguralAll-Star Teacher Award recipient. Allen Nakamura of Alameda High School in Alameda, CA was named the2008 All-Star Teacher, and Jessica Schelegle of Sacred Heart School in Saratoga, CA was the2009 All-Star Teacher winner. Last years 2010All-Star Teacher was Zachary Swan of Jefferson High School in Daly City, CA.About Provident Credit Union:
Provident Credit Union is a 1.6 billion financial institution with over 96,000 members and 18 community branches in the Bay Area. The Redwood Shores-based credit union has proudly served the Bay Area since 1950. The full-service credit union offers everything from checking and savings accounts through mortgages, auto loans, mutual funds and home and auto insurance. Provident began as the California Teachers Association Credit Union and expanded over the years to include those who live and work in the surrounding counties of the Bay Area and beyond. More information is available at About Comcast Sports Group:
Comcast Sports Group, part of the NBC Sports Group, consists of 14 local networks that deliver 2,400 sporting events annually and breaking news and analysis to more than 50 million cable and satellite homes. Comcast Sports Groups sports networks are: Comcast SportsNet Bay Area, Comcast SportsNet California, Comcast SportsNet Chicago, Comcast SportsNet Mid-Atlantic, Comcast SportsNet New England, Comcast SportsNet Northwest, Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia, SNY, The Mtn. Mountain West Sports Network, CSS and Comcast Sports Southwest. Comcast Sports Group also manages NECN (New England Cable News), the nations largest regional news network, and The Comcast Network, based in Philadelphia and Washington, which delivers community-oriented programming. For more information, see

Durant finds motivation in those doubting his hunger

Durant finds motivation in those doubting his hunger

NEW ORLEANS – It’s early Thursday night and practice is over and the Warriors, one by one, have filed out of Smoothie King Center and onto one of two team buses.

Only one player remains: Kevin Durant, the 6-foot-9 forward, a nine-year NBA veteran with four NBA scoring titles and an MVP trophy among his possessions.

Durant at one end of the court continues to go through his vast arsenal of offensive moves. The drop-step. The step-back. The swipe. The spin-and-dunk. Sweat drips from his chin, his arms and his gray Warriors T-shirt. He’s talking to himself. He’s destroying Chris DeMarco, a 6-8 former small college power forward who has evolved into a valuable but oft-abused assistant coach.

“They say I’m not hungry,” Durant barks out at one point, before sprinting into a corner and launching a 3-pointer and then sprinting to the top of the key for another trey.

By now DeMarco, also soaked his perspiration, is watching from a seat on the bench. No matter. He rises yet again to go back at Durant in a matchup that feels very much like championship fighter and sparring partner.

Durant finally ends the functional torture of DeMarco and flops into a seat.

“How much fun do you have beating up on DeMarco,” he is asked.

Durant breaks into a grin.

“Those are people that you don’t really get to know, get to see, that contribute to success,” Durant says. “DeMarco, ever since I got here he’s been helping get better. He lets me beat up on him and work on my game. It’s easy to just go out there by yourself. But just having another voice and having token defense out there definitely helps. I’m just trying to get better, man.

“That’s what I’m all about.”

When asked about his “hungry” remark, Durant reveals a bit of himself. Like many sports superstars, he hears the chatter and absorbs the slights. Though the comment was made in earshot of a few reporters, it shines a light into the psychological games he plays with himself.

“That’s what I say to myself when I’m working,” he says. “I hear it all the time. You hear the noise. You hear what they say about you. Everybody hears it.

“So it’s a little extra motivation when I’m out there. Nobody in this arena right now, and that’s when you get better. Nobody sees you when you’re doing this stuff right here. But luckily, y’all were in here watching.”

Durant is on a roll now. He’s loose, he’s feeling good and he’s pulling off the mask.

“You hear that stuff and you just use it fuel,” he says. “You don’t let it affect you, obviously, but when you’re out on the court you just try to use it as fuel. And keep getting better. That’s how I am.”

Asked if he reads the criticism, Durant takes only a fraction of a step backward.

“It’s not that I read it,” he says. “It’s just in the air. It’s in the atmosphere, and people tell you and you hear about it and (reporters) ask me questions about it all the time. So, obviously, I know.

“But I’m not losing sleep on it. It’s just wood on that fire. You just keep always wanting to get better.”

Which opens the door to the subject of opening night, when the Warriors were manhandled in a 129-100 loss to San Antonio, prompting spirited debate among street-corner coaches and general managers.

“Obviously, you’re going to hear everything,” he says, grinning. “ ‘The season is over.’ ‘The team is the worst team in the league.’

“You thought it was going to be easy? It’s one game,” he adds. I remember losing in the playoffs by 30 or beating someone by 30 in Game 1 of the playoffs, and you say it’s only one game. And it’s one game in 82, and you (expletive) guys are making it feel like the world is ending.”

Durant is out of his chair. Still sweating, walks toward the exit to get on the bus.

He did what he felt he needed to do to get better. He said what he felt he needed to say, responding to critics. And he did it all with no less than a trace of a smile.

Harbaugh could make over $10M in 2016, more than Saban


Harbaugh could make over $10M in 2016, more than Saban

When USA Today released their annual series on college football coaching salaries, it wasn’t a complete shock to see Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh top the list given how much the school has invested in him since he returned to Ann Arbor from the NFL.

What was a little surprising was the total compensation figure listed for the Wolverines’ head coach at a whopping $9,004,000. That’s a figure that’s more than $2 million more than the second highest paid coach (Nick Saban) and $3 million more than Big Ten rival Urban Meyer.