Giants blanked in Game 2 loss to Pirates

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Giants blanked in Game 2 loss to Pirates

April 27, 2011BOX SCORE GIANTS VIDEOMLB PAGE MLB SCOREBOARD

PITTSBURGH (AP) James McDonald had a reason to celebrate for the first time this season. Madison Bumgarner is still waiting his turn.McDonald pitched six sharp innings Wednesday night for his first victory of the season, and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the San Francisco Giants 2-0.He allowed four hits and four walks while striking out three. McDonald (1-2) lowered his ERA to 7.66 from 10.13."It feels like I got a monkey off my back with the first win," McDonald said. "I feel a little less stress now."Bumgarner (0-4) remained winless despite allowing only one run and five hits in six innings with one walk and seven strikeouts. He cut his ERA to 6.17 from 7.79, but the Giants lost for the fifth time in six games to fall below .500 at 11-12.
URBAN: (Mad) Bum luck
"I thought Madison did a great job," San Francisco manager Bruce Bochy said. "He kept his poise and stayed away from the crooked number that has killed him. It's tough to not get runs for him. It'd be big to get him his first win."Mike Crotta, Joe Beimel, Chris Resop and Joel Hanrahan completed the five-hitter for Pittsburgh. Hanrahan recorded his seventh save in seven opportunities, getting Miguel Tejada to ground into a game-ending double play with runners on first and second.The announced attendance was 9,048 the number of tickets sold but the actual turnstile count appeared much smaller. The crowd was held down because the Pittsburgh Penguins and Tampa Bay Lightning were playing across town in Game 7 of their first-round Stanley Cup playoff series.The Penguins lost 1-0.McDonald was tagged for eight runs in three innings at Florida in his previous start six days earlier. Pirates catcher Chris Snyder said the difference this time was that McDonald didn't rely as much on his fastball and threw more curveballs and changeups."He mixed it up really well," Snyder said. "He needed that start. He needed to get something going, something to give him confidence."McDonald also got his ERA back into three digits after allowing 21 earned runs in 18 23 innings in his first four starts. However, against the Giants, McDonald looked more like the pitcher who went 4-5 with a 3.52 ERA in 11 starts last season after being acquired from the Los Angeles Dodgers at the July 31 trading deadline."The best way to knock down an ERA is to put up zeros and that's exactly what James did," Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle said. "He did a great job."Bumgarner, like McDonald, was coming off a rough start as he allowed four runs in 2 23 innings against Atlanta last Friday. While he did not get a win, Bumgarner believed he made progress."I felt smoother and worked out of some jams," he said. "I really was taking it one inning at a time instead of looking at the whole ballgame at once."Snyder and Jose Tabata each singled in a run for the Pirates while Neil Walker and Steve Pearce had two hits apiece. San Francisco's Cody Ross also had two hits after entering the game batting .158.Walker scored the game's first run in the second inning when he singled off Bumgarner's glove, took third on Pearce's double and scored on Snyder's hit into center field. Tabata's two-out single to right field off Guillermo Mota in the seventh scored Brandon Wood, who had singled, and made it 2-0.San Francisco's best scoring chance came in the second inning when it put runners on second and third with one out. However, McDonald got Tejada and Bumgarner to ground out to end the threat.The Giants have scored just 14 runs in their last six games while hitting .188 with only one home run.
REPORT: Giants to put DeRosa on DL
NOTES: San Francisco INF Mark DeRosa is likely to be placed on the disabled list Thursday because of inflammation in his left wrist, which was surgically repaired each of the last two years. Triple-A Fresno INF Emmanuel Burriss was scheduled to arrive in Pittsburgh late Wednesday night in order to be available to play in Thursday afternoon's game if DeRosa goes on the DL. OF Xavier Paul, claimed off waivers from the Los Angeles Dodgers on Tuesday, arrived in the Pittsburgh clubhouse following the game. OF John Bowker said he was told by the Pirates that he will be designated for assignment on Thursday to clear a roster space for Paul. Pittsburgh 1B Lyle Overbay, who has only one extra-base hit in his last 14 games, was not in the lineup for the second time in three games, and SS Ronny Cedeno was benched a night after failing to run out a groundball in a 3-2 loss to the Giants in 10 innings. San Francisco RHP Ryan Vogelsong is scheduled to make his first major league start since Sept. 29, 2004, on Thursday. Vogelsong's last start came for Pittsburgh.

Report: Colts request permission to interview Paton

Report: Colts request permission to interview Paton

George Paton, one of the remaining possibilities for the 49ers’ general manager position, is reportedly on the Indianapolis Colts’ list of candidates to fill their vacancy, too.

The Colts have requested permission to speak with Paton, the assistant general manager of the Minnesota Vikings, Tom Pelissero of USA Today reported on Monday.

Paton is scheduled for a second interview with the 49ers on Friday, along with Atlanta offensive coordinator and San Francisco’s presumptive head coach, in Atlanta.

The Colts also requested permission to interview Seattle co-directors of player personnel Trent Kirchner and Scott Fitterer, USA Today reported. Kirchern and Fitterer also interviewed with the 49ers. Kirchner pulled his name from consideration, while the 49ers informed Fitterer he would not be asked back for a second interview.

The Colts fired general manager Ryan Grigson on Saturday. Owner Jim Irsay said Indianapolis’ vice president of football operations Jimmy Raye III would be a candidate. The 49ers also interviewed Raye, who was informed he would not be included in a second round of interviews.

Arizona vice president of player personnel Terry McDonough is the other known candidate for the 49ers’ general manager position that opened when the firing of Trent Baalke was announced at the conclusion of the team’s 2-14 season.
 

'Woke' David West is going to fight the fight against Donald Trump

'Woke' David West is going to fight the fight against Donald Trump

Programming note: Warriors-Heat coverage starts today at 3:30pm with Warriors Pregame Live on CSN Bay Area, and streaming live right here.

He is a credentialed NBA star, with enough personal wealth to choose achievement over dollars, the conviction to stand on principle and such an acute cultural awareness that he’s simply unable to tune out the despair gripping much of America.

David West has deep concerns and many questions.

It’s not that he questions himself and everything he was taught and remains committed to teaching others. The Warriors forward, 36, has seen inequality, up close, yet still continues to believe in the human spirit and its capacity to overcome.

Though he clearly is disturbed by the wave of crude belligerence represented by our latest president, Donald Trump, inaugurated only days ago, what’s more distressing to West is the transparent bigotry and misogyny, which points up the rampant ignorance behind his rise.

“He brought out an element of our society that a lot of folks assumed was dead,” West said on the CSN Bay Area Warriors Insider Podcast. “A lot of folks assumed that that part of our country was no longer, based on the election of President Obama. But what Donald Trump did was, he reached for a demographic of people who responded to some of the most infantile, non-decent language that you could expect coming from a president candidate. Folks bit.”

West didn’t bite. Didn’t even think about biting. No, he’s going the opposite way.

He’s going to fight the fight. The married father of two is going to do it by flexing his mind more than his imposing 6-foot-9, 250-pound physique.

He’s going to stand with the millions of women who marched over the weekend. He’s going to stand with the millions of people who feel their quest for justice is endangered. He’s going to stand with those whose health care is in peril. He’s going to stand with those who understand that science telling us that climate changes is a grave global threat.

West is going to stand for truth and fairness and courtesy, even if he is uncertain whether the president sending out angry tweets and advocating “alternative facts” will be standing at his side.

“All the tactics that he used to get elected are the very things that someone like me, who works with youth on a consistent basis, are the things that we try to talk our young folks out of being,” West said. “We try to talk our young people out of being bullies. We try to talk our young men out of disrespecting women. We try to talk our young people into being accepting of other people’s opinions and other people’s walks of life.

“And he is the complete opposite of all of that.”

West, who earned his degree in communications from Xavier University in 2003, studies people of all stripes, from the great philosophers such as Nietzsche and Plato, to his coaches and the youngsters he mentors. He has a passion for knowledge as well as a profound appreciation for others with similar pursuits. Moreover, he believes in first-hand involvement.

So he involves himself in issues pertinent to gaining knowledge and investing -- financially, emotionally and intellectually -- in the future. He examines reality and how it relates to such issues as the infant mortality rate, the hypocrisy contained within United States Constitution and the tenuous dynamic between law enforcement and people of color.

West doesn’t stop there. He is a crusader for human rights. He has made multiple visits to Africa to peel back the layers of those who inhabit the continent. He is acutely attuned to matters of climate change; he’s the lone athlete/celebrity on the advisory board of Zoetic Global, an American-based group devoted to clean-energy technology, specifically hyperkinetic turbines.

West is, in the vernacular, “woke.”

He vocalized full support for 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, whose very public attempts to shine a light on the frequency of deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of law enforcement.

There was considerable outrage over Kaepernick’s perceived disrespect of the flag as a symbol for the country when his actual cause is a plea for fairness.

“And people are too one-sided, too one-dimensional in their thought process, to get to that,” West said. “So all they saw him doing was a physical gesture. All they saw him doing was taking a knee.

“The issue, when we get to the basis of all this, is that there is a group of people who want justice -- people who want justice. And regardless of opposite or opposing views, justice should be just. And it should be for everyone. And when that environment doesn’t exist or is not readily available in terms of what we’re witnessing, then people are going to have things to say.”

Asked about the value of and prevalence with which sports celebrities speak up, as Kaepernick did, West offered an enlightening response.

“I’m not sure that the athletes, in terms of a collective group, are in a position, in terms of information, to take the type of stand that Colin took,” he said. “That’s kind of what gets lost in the interpretation as well. Folks see him, and if you’ve ever listened to Colin speak or if you ever followed him, he has a large information base. And I think it’s unfair to assume that other pro athletes have that same base.

“That’s very important, because what we have now, on the flip side, is very low-information athletes or former athletes who do speak up and who say things, who should not be saying anything at all.”

As for those NBA authority figures, such as Warriors coach Steve Kerr and Spurs coach Gregg Popovich, comfortable with sociopolitical dialogue openly and from a knowledgeable perspective, West expresses gratitude for their words and effort.

“Those guys are different,” he says, “because they take the time to become a little bit more understanding of the guys they are around most of the year.

“Steve wants to know how we feel about what popped up on the news yesterday or the day before, about what’s going on because all of that plays a part who you are.”

As irritated as West is with the disrespect frequently shown to former President Barack Obama, the nation’s first black commander-in-chief, he was pleased with Obama’s ability to reply with “dignity and class” under sometimes trying conditions.

We have elected in Trump someone who West, putting it mildly, “somebody who’s not as nuanced in dealing with folks.”

West is among a select group of high-profile athletes to speak openly of his concern about Trump. Knicks center Joakim Noah expressed his discontent, as has Trail Blazers guard CJ McCollum and former 49ers receiver Torrey Smith.

West, however, is among the elder statesmen of American athletes. And someone who puts his mind and time where his heart is. So, there remains at least . . . hope.

“We’re just in for a very different type of administration, where we’ve got to brace for a different type of leadership, unlike anything this country has ever seen,” he said of Trump. “For a lot of folks, they’re just trying to see what he’s going to do next. What’s going to happen? Some of the things he’s said, the things that he’s backed up, the things he’s projected of himself out onto the world, I don’t think anybody expected him to be able to get elected to such a prestigious and powerful seat in this country.

“I don’t know how you balance it. We all have to just wait and see. Folks inside the political system, who are tasked with the job of keeping him in check and keeping him under control, we’ve got to hold their feet to the fire.”