Giants, Phillies clear benches, brawl at AT&T Park


Giants, Phillies clear benches, brawl at AT&T Park

Aug. 5, 2011


Mychael Urban

SAN FRANCISCO -- The growing rivalry between the defending world champion Giants and the Phillies reached a new level of intensity Friday night at AT&T Park, as a full-blown brawl between last years National League Championship Series combatants broke out in the sixth inning.

VIEW: Giants Insider gallery: Anatomy of a BrawlWith the Phils having blown the game open with three runs to take an 8-2 lead, Giants reliever Ramon Ramirez drilled Shane Victorino in the back with a pitch. Victorino took a few steps toward the mound, prompting Giants catcher Eli Whiteside to bounce from behind the plate to get between the two, eagerly hopping up and down before lunging at the first Phillie that came into his sight.
Both benches emptied in a heartbeat, recalling a similar scene from the second inning of Game 6 of the 2010 NLCS, but this time blows were thrown and order wasnt restored for approximately 10 minutes.
RECAP: Tempers flare in Giants' 9-2 loss to Phillies
Victorino, who twice appeared to go after unidentifiable Giants during the scrum, Ramirez, and Whiteside were ejected in the aftermath.

Report: Former 49ers WR works out for Jets

Report: Former 49ers WR works out for Jets

The competition between the Jets and Patriots extended into free-agent workouts this week. 

New England on Wednesday reportedly tried out Dres Anderson, a wide receiver recently released by the 49ers.

New York a day later brought Anderson in for a workout, according to ESPN's Adam Caplan. 

Anderson, 24, entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent with the 49ers in 2015. 

He has yet to appear in a regular-season game.

Anderson was released from the 49ers practice squad on Tuesday, Oct. 18 to clear room for another wide receiver, DeAndre Smelter.  

NFL disregards domestic violence, as Giants extend its tolerance scale


NFL disregards domestic violence, as Giants extend its tolerance scale

The National Football League has been reminded yet again that it neither understands nor cares to understand about domestic violence.

But it will do better, you may rest assured. They’ll have a week where all the on-field personnel wear purple to commemorate the bruises.

That’s what the NFL does when it can no longer ignore its own tone-deafness – they turn their stupidity into a marketing opportunity. After all, every social problem can be solved in the league’s eyes by figuring out a way for the league to monetize it.

The latest example of the NFL’s slack-jawed world view comes from New York, where the Giants could not and still cannot figure out what to do about kicker/serial domestic abuser Josh Brown except not let him go to London for the weekend.

This means the league has learned nothing from the Ray Rice incident, even as Rice of all people is showing on a regular basis how to learn from it. More than that, it means it has no interest in learning anything about it, and will never prioritize it beyond crisis-management level – “Uh-oh, something bad just happened. Quick, put it behind us.”

Then again, the league has been so relentlessly ham-handed on so many things that, as convenient as this may be for it, we should stop expecting it to do so, to the point that when someone from the league wants to explain some social issue to us we should simply say with one voice, “Oh, shut up, you yammering frauds.”

It is difficult to prioritize the number of ways the Giants failed to comprehend the problem currently smacking them between the numbers, although owner John Mara’s “He admitted to us he'd abused his wife in the past. What’s a little unclear is the extent of that” may summarize it nicely.

Put another way, one could make a case that the Giants extended the universal talent-tolerance scale (if you have the talent, anything can be tolerated until it can’t) to include placekickers.

That seems less likely, though, than the more obvious point that the league doesn’t regard domestic violence as something worth concerning itself with, while bloviating all the time about all the things with which it is concerned. The league is the beat cop who never gets out of his car to see what is happening on his beat, and is shocked when something does.

And while it will be handy to pile this atop the list of reasons why Commissioner Roger Goodell doesn’t get it, the truth is he is merely the painful rash that reveals the league’s case of shingles. The league’s 32 constituent elements are culpable here because ignorance in the face of so much evidence becomes willful, and Goodell’s skill is not in guiding the league but in figuring out where his 32 bosses want him to go, and avoiding all the places they don’t.

Hence, domestic violence. This is not an easy problem to solve, as any expert will say, but Mara trying to decide how many punches are enough isn’t it. The league’s six-game suspension guideline that is now four years old has never been imposed on any player. It wants the power to use the talent-tolerance scale at whim to do what it wishes when it wishes to do it.

Or in this case, not do anything at all until it has to, and then in as minimal a fashion as it can manage.

So, Josh Brown loses a week in a foreign country on the company dime as a trade-off for continually terrorizing his wife. The league says it punished him for a game but was powerless to do anything else while knowing all along how severe the problem had become.

In short, it did the minimum. Now that everyone knows the fullest extent of Brown’s abuse, and how much the league knew without doing anything, it will now extend the minimum out to what it thinks is a new minimum.

So we now know that the NFL is looking for some metric that will determine the transactional “extent of that,” as John Mara so eloquently put it for us. When it comes up with that formula, it will surely ignore that standard, because the real standard is still “talent-tolerance,” and the world is made up of concentric circles surrounding the people who make the league and its members a dollar more tomorrow than it made today.

And spouses are a long way from the center.