Giants' World Series Memorabilia to Hall of Fame

Giants' World Series Memorabilia to Hall of Fame

Nov. 19, 2010GIANTS PAGE GIANTS VIDEOGIANTS WORLD SERIES PAGE

COOPERSTOWN, NY As the San Francisco Giants celebrate their first World Series championship, treasures from the baseballs most memorable moments from the 2010 postseason are now on display in the Autumn Glory exhibit at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown.

Following the Giants World Series-clinching win on Nov. 1, the Museum acquired nearly a dozen artifacts from the both the Giants and the Texas Rangers. Artifacts donated by the Giants from the 106th World Series include:

- Road jersey worn by Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum in Game 5; Lincecum won two games in the Fall Classic.

- Bat used by World Series Most Valuable Player Edgar Renteria to hit his game-winning home run in Game 5.

- World Series batting helmet worn by Cody Ross, who scored five runs in the World Series.

- Cap worn by Madison Bumgarner in Game 4 when the rookie pitched eight shutout innings.

- Cap worn by Matt Cain in Game 2; Cain allowed no earned runs in 21.1 postseason innings this year.

- Left spike worn by Aubrey Huff in the Series; Huff drove in eight runs in the 2010 postseason.

- Catchers mask and spikes worn by Buster Posey throughout the Series; Posey hit .300 in the Fall Classic.

- Press pin from the World Series.

Additional items from the Giants World Series title may be added to the exhibit in the coming weeks. In addition to these treasures, the exhibit also features artifacts from the American League champions Rangers from the 2010 World Series postseason, including:

- Bat used by the Rangers Mitch Moreland to hit his Game 3 home run, the first World Series round-tripper in Rangers history.

- Ceremonial first pitch ball from Game 4, delivered by former President George W. Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, signed by both men.

- Dirt taken from around the pitching mound following Game 3 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington to mark the first World Series game in North Texas history.

The 2010 World Series exhibit in Autumn Glory will be on display through the 2011 Major League Baseball postseason. Entrance to the Autumn Glory exhibit is included with Museum admission.

The Museum collections contain many artifacts documenting the entire history of World Series and postseason play, including Don Larsens cap and Yogi Berras mitt from Larsens 1956 perfect game; Bill Mazeroskis (1960) and Joe Carters (1993) bats from their Series-ending blasts; and World Series rings from the last century of Fall Classic competition.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is open seven days a week year round, with the exception of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day. The Museum observes regular hours of 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. from Labor Day until Memorial Day Weekend. From Memorial Day through the day before Labor Day, the Museum is open from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. Ticket prices are 16.50 for adults (13 and over), 11 for seniors (65 and over) and for those holding current memberships in the VFW, Disabled American Veterans, American Legion and AMVets organizations, and 6 for juniors (ages 7-12). Members are always admitted free of charge and there is no charge for children 6 years of age or younger. For more information, visit our Web site at baseballhall.org or call 888-HALL-OF-FAME (888-425-5633) or 607-547-7200.

Courtesy National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum media services.

A's holiday shopping focuses on a center fielder

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A's holiday shopping focuses on a center fielder

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The A’s didn’t add any players during the four-day winter meetings, but they did wave goodbye to one.

Minor league right-hander Dylan Covey was scooped up by the Chicago White Sox in Thursday’s Rule 5 draft. The Sox pay the A’s $50,000 for his rights, and he must either remain on their 25-man roster for the entire 2017 season or be offered back to Oakland for $25,000.

The 25-year-old Covey, ranked the A’s No. 20 prospect by mlb.com, was an Arizona Fall League standout this offseason after working his way back from an oblique injury that wiped out most of his 2016 season.

“We’ll see what happens,” A’s general manager David Forst said. “He certainly was as deserving as anybody of being protected (on the A’s 40-man roster), we just ran out of spots. Good for him to get this opportunity.”

As for ways Oakland might supplement its own roster, that task continues.

The A’s held plenty of discussions over four days spent at the sprawling Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, but those talks didn’t bear fruit in their search for a center fielder. They had trade dialogue with the Kansas City Royals regarding Jarrod Dyson, a blazing runner and potential leadoff man, but couldn’t find common ground.

As the holidays approach, the A’s will continue to scan the free agent market and explore trade opportunities.

“My guess is there are plenty of things we talked about this week that have legs, and those conversations will continue over the next few weeks,” Forst said. “We’ve got two months until pitchers and catchers report, four months until the season. We’re not the only ones leaving here without actually consummating something.”

The Orioles are another team reportedly trying to pry Dyson from the Royals. Another center fielder mentioned as being available is Reds speedster Billy Hamilton, although reports suggest Cincinnati isn’t in a rush to move him.

Dexter Fowler is the best free agent center fielder still on the market, although Austin Jackson and Rajai Davis seem to fall more in the A’s price range.

Forst was asked how much urgency there is to the center field search.

“I’m not confident they’re gonna be there all winter, there’s only a certain number of guys,” he said. “We’re not going to risk anything to jump out (and do something) we wouldn’t otherwise do. But we think we’re being diligent.

“We cast a wide net, and we continue to. We have to keep doing that just to make sure — free agents, trades, different kinds of players, platoons, whatever. I think we have to keep our toes in every option.”

As for other areas the A’s can improve, they may look to add a veteran starting pitcher. Just speculation, but Doug Fister is one free agent whose price tag figures to be reasonable, and he’s a Northern California native. However, it wouldn’t be a surprise if the A’s simply invited a veteran to camp on a minor league contract to see if they can find a diamond in the rough, or at least someone to provide competition.

A’s executive VP of baseball operations Billy Beane mentioned second base as an area of concern because of injury issues (Jed Lowrie) and inexperience (Joey Wendle, Chad Pinder), but it’s very possible the A’s stick with their in-house options.

Mo Speights calls Clippers out for complaining to refs too much

Mo Speights calls Clippers out for complaining to refs too much

The Warriors led the Clippers by 18 points after the first quarter on Wednesday night and cruised to a 115-98 victory.

Marreese Speights registered 15 points and nine rebounds in 16 minutes off the bench for Los Angeles.

After the game, the former Warrior was asked what the difference is between the two teams.

“First we need to start really just leaving the refs alone,” Speights told the Orange County Register. “Guys just got to sacrifice, do some other things than scoring, do some other things than your personal goals. Just try something new.

“They’ve been doing it here for four or five years and it hasn’t been working, so it’s time to try something new.”

Speights played for Golden State the prior three seasons and averaged 10.4 points per game during the Warriors' 2014-15 championship run.

He has been trying to tell his new teammates what they need to do to get to the Warriors' level.

“Tonight, they see it, they see everything I say. Everything I say in practice since I’ve been here, they see it. That’s how they (the Warriors) play...

"Move the ball really well, they get everybody involved, they play good team defense. And they capitalize off our mistakes. We turned the ball over a lot in the first quarter and they capitalized."

The Clippers were called for three technical fouls -- one apiece for Chris Paul, Doc Rivers and Blake Griffin -- and trailed by as many as 27 points.

The Warriors have now won seven straight games against their Pacific Division rivals and hold a 3.5 game lead over the Clippers for the top spot in the Western Conference.

The teams don't square off again until Jan. 28.

Speights also provided insight into what the scouting report is when you face the Clippers.

“It’s always been, especially with the Warriors, you play against the Clippers, you hit them a couple of times and their spirit is going to be down. That’s what happened, so we’ve just got to find a way to get over that hump.”