If Martin takes legal action, it could be end of his career

YSTL: What are possible legal consequences for Richie Incognito?

If Martin takes legal action, it could be end of his career
November 4, 2013, 9:45 pm
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Ironically, Richie Incognito was the co-winner of the Dolphins' Good Guy Award last season, given to the team's most cooperative player by the local media. (AP)

Something is rapidly being lost in the Jonathan Martin-Richie Incognito story. In fact, a lot is being lost. Starting with the fact that what we already are aware of isn’t bullying. It’s way worse than that, and calling it bullying almost dignifies it.

It’s almost surely legally actionable, and if Martin wants to sue the responsible parties, including the Dolphins, it would be a landmark case well worth pursuing. It would also be the end of Martin’s football career, because aggrieved parties never are treated well when they decide not to be aggrieved any longer.

And finally, “not knowing” is a fraudulent argument, and one that probably requires suspension at best and firing at worst. That’s for general manager Jeff Ireland, head coach Joe Philbin, any assistant coach who knew and did not intervene, and Martin’s more senior teammates. If they knew and did nothing, they’re culpable.

In other news, the Dolphins are 3½-point favorites at Tampa Monday night. Enjoy the game.

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Oh, and here’s your takeaway quote, from Philbin’s Monday presser: “If the (NFL’s) review shows this is not a safe atmosphere, I will take whatever measures necessary to assure that it is.” In other words, it’s good until the principal says it isn’t. That’s awareness.

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NBC Sports soccer analyst Robbie Mustoe hit the nail on the head when he pointed out that Europeans have a different view of players who get their heads nailed. He was reacting to Tottenham goaltender Hugo Lloris, who was inadvertently kneed in the derby holder by Everton’s Romelu Lukaku in one of Saturday’s English Premiership matches. Lloris was out for at least a few moments, was wobbly when he got up, and needed 10 minutes to clear his head, at which point he returned to the game to much consternation by the brain injury types. They praised Lloris’ “toughness” and head coach Andre Villas-Boas essentially said Lloris “seemed assertive and determined to continue and showed great character and personality. We decided to keep him on based on that.”

Looks like a job for “League Of Denial.”

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So far, the seven teams considered most likely to want to tank their season for a chance at Andrew Wiggins are 10-14. Does nobody read the memos from the front office any more?

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Matt Flynn, we hardly knew ye . . . again.

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And finally, Lew Wolff’s statement that the A’s are still working on a new lease with the Coliseum does not contradict any of the reporting in Sunday’s San Francisco Chronicle story claiming that Major League Baseball is willing to step in to squeeze the Coliseum’s shoes to make sure any new deal is more favorable to the A’s. In other words, leverage exists, it will be used, and the A’s will get the lease they want.

Just like nothing ever happened. Which it didn’t.