Lincecum unlikely to start Thursday vs. Phils


Lincecum unlikely to start Thursday vs. Phils

July 27, 2011


Follow @MUrbanCSN
Mychael Urban

PHILADELPHIA -- Giants right-hander Tim Lincecum, whose scheduled start against the Phillies on Tuesday was scratched 90 minutes before the first pitch of the opener of a three-game series at Citizens Bank Park, is unlikely to pitch at all in this weeks matchup between 2010 National League Championship combatants.Lincecum reported to the visitors clubhouse Tuesday suffering from flu-like symptoms, forcing manager Bruce Bochy to shift gears and hand the ball to lefty Barry Zito, who surrendered three homers and six earned runs over seven innings in the Giants 7-2 loss.Sent home to get some rest while Tuesdays game was under way, Lincecum was back with the team Wednesday and said he suspected he was victimized by food poisoning, noting that he was unable to keep any food or liquid down for several houRS and lost weight during the ordeal.With Lincecum still weakened, Bochy turned to righty Matt Cain, who had been scheduled to pitch Thursdays series finale but still was on regular rest Wednesday because of Mondays day off.Lincecum could take his turn Thursday, but Bochy sounded uncomfortable with that scenario.The temperature and humidity in Philadelphia are expected to be high Thursday, and Bochy noted that, its not really fair to ask a guy whos weakened to go out and pitch in heat like that.Thus, righty Ryan Vogelsong likely will take Lincecums turn, with Lincecum working Friday or Saturday in Cincinnati.

Rockets PG Patrick Beverley to undergo knee surgery

Rockets PG Patrick Beverley to undergo knee surgery

HOUSTON – Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey announced Saturday guard Patrick Beverley will undergo arthroscopic surgery on his left knee on Tuesday, Oct. 25. 

The surgery will be performed by Dr. Walt Lowe. 

Following the surgery, Beverley will be re-evaluated by Lowe and Dr. Steven Flores in approximately three weeks.

Houston Rockets media services

MLB becomes whole new ballgame since Cubs last World Series trip


MLB becomes whole new ballgame since Cubs last World Series trip

One way to realize just how long it's been since the Chicago Cubs last reached the World Series is to look at how much the game has changed since then, on and off the field.

The Cubs are making their first appearance since 1945 and chasing their first title since 1908.

Some of the ways the game has changed since the Cubs lost Game 7 to the Detroit Tigers some 71 years ago:

INTEGRATION: Jackie Robinson became the first black player to reach the major leagues in 1947, two years after the Cubs' last World Series appearance. Baseball has turned into a virtual melting pot in the seven decades since. The Cubs' roster includes players from Cuba (reliever Aroldis Chapman and outfielder Jorge Soler), along with Venezuela, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, as well as the United States.

EXPANSION: There were 16 teams in the majors in 1945, including two in St. Louis, Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago, and three in New York. The total is up to 30 now.

GO WEST: There were no major league franchises west of St. Louis in 1945. The Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles and the New York Giants headed to San Francisco in 1958. In 1969, the Seattle Pilots showed up - they went 64-98 in their first year, then became the Milwaukee Brewers.

DIVISIONAL PLAY: There were no divisions in 1945, just eight teams in both the American League and National League. They split into East and West divisions in 1969. Then a Central was created in 1994, with the Cubs shifting from the NL East to the NL Central.

PLAYOFFS PLUS: Extra teams and divisions resulted in expanded playoffs. The League Championship Series began in 1969, the Division Series started in 1995 and a one-game wild-card playoff came in 2012. A longer postseason pushed the World Series deep into October and beyond. If the Cubs and Cleveland go the distance this year, Game 7 would be on Nov. 2.

FREE AGENCY: When Phil Cavarretta and Peanuts Lowrey helped lead the Cubs to the 1945 Series, they were bound to the team until they were traded or released. Curt Flood tested baseball's reserve clause in the early 1970s and took his case to the U.S. Supreme Court, helping pave the way for players to move around as free agents. Jon Lester, John Lackey and Ben Zobrist are among the players the Cubs acquired this way.

DESIGNATED HITTER: The designated hitter joined the American League lineup in 1973. The DH debate is still hot, with the leagues playing by different rules. When this year's World Series opens at the AL park, both teams will use the DH; when the Cubs host, the pitchers will hit.

LIGHTS AT WRIGLEY: The Cubs were the last team in the majors to play only day games. That changed when lights were installed at Wrigley Field in 1988. The games there have always been played outdoors on green grass, never under a dome or on artificial turf, trends that became popular starting with the Astrodome in the mid-1960s.