NBA lockout: Everything you need to know

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NBA lockout: Everything you need to know

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Some questions and answers about the NBA's labor impasse: Q: What's the damage so far? A: NBA Commissioner David Stern canceled the first two weeks of the regular season Monday, with both owners and players estimating losses at hundreds of millions of dollars. Q: What happens next? A: No meetings are currently scheduled, and Stern warned that more games could be lost with each passing day. Q: What were the NBA's revenues last season? A: The league brought in about 4.3 billion, of which 3.8 billion fell into the category of basketball-related income (BRI). BRI is basically all the money made through basketball operations, including gate receipts, broadcast revenues, in-arena sales of novelties and concessions, arena signage revenues, game parking and program revenues, sponsorship revenues, etc. Q: So what's the problem? A: Players were guaranteed 57 percent of BRI, and the league says owners were destined to lose money when they only kept 43 cents of every dollar. Q: How bad was it for owners? A: They say they lost 300 million last season, after losing hundreds of millions in every year of the previous collective bargaining agreement that was ratified in 2005. The league says 22 of its 30 teams lost money, including losses of 20 million or more for 11 of them. Q: Couldn't they avoid those problems if the teams that made money shared more with the others? A: That's what the players say, calling the NBA's revenue-sharing program "insignificant." The league says a more robust revenue-sharing plan is coming, but not until after a new CBA with the players, because right now all it would be doing is sharing losses. Q: What do the owners want? A: The league has two goals in the negotiations: A system that would guarantee owners a chance to make a profit, and a system where all teams would have a chance to compete equally for a championship. Q: How far apart are they financially? A: Each side's last formal proposal was a 53-47 revenue split in its favor. Given each full BRI percentage point was worth nearly 40 million last season, the sides are officially around 240 million apart in the first year of a deal. Q: Why is competitive balance a problem now? A: Because the NBA's "soft" salary cap system allows teams to spend above it by using various exceptions. There is a luxury tax level in which teams have to pay a 1 tax for every 1 they exceed the threshold by, but big-market teams simply absorbed the penalty that smaller-market clubs were unable to. So the league says small-market teams can't compete in the NBA like they do in the NFL, where Green Bay, Indianapolis, New Orleans and Pittsburgh have won recent Super Bowls. Q: What do players think about a hard cap? A: They're completely opposed, to the extent that union executive director Billy Hunter has called it a "blood issue." Players believe a hard cap would eliminate fully guaranteed contracts for all but a handful of top players and set up a system like the NFL, where teams cut even high-performing players for cap reasons and aren't required to pay their full contracts. Q: Is playing overseas a viable option? A: Not as good as players hoped, which is why Stern downplayed it as a bargaining threat from the start. Economic difficulties in Europe mean teams there simply can't pay enough to entice NBA stars, and China essentially removed itself as an option when it ruled its teams couldn't offer contracts with opt-out clauses, meaning players who sign there are required to stay all season. Q: Can they still play a full 82-game season? A: Stern said everything is negotiable, but it will be difficult. Arenas have few dates available and already have been told they can book events on nights games were scheduled for the first two weeks of the season.

Rewind: Kings start fast in Dallas, snap losing streak

Rewind: Kings start fast in Dallas, snap losing streak

Sometime you just have to take care of business. That is exactly what the Sacramento Kings did Wednesday night when they walked into the American Airlines Center in Dallas, Texas and handed the Mavericks a 120-89 smackdown.

For one of the few times in recent memory, the Kings got off to a quick start. Sacramento took a 26-23 lead into the second quarter. They pushed their advantage to as many as 13 before the break, before settling for a 56-52 lead heading into halftime.

And then the Kings dropped the hammer.

Dallas was on the ropes from the start of the third. The Kings opened the second half with an 11-0 run to get separation and then kept pounding away on the Mavericks to take a 85-64 lead into the fourth where the Mavs waived the white flag early.

“I felt like we were good on both ends,” Omri Casspi told reporters following the game. “We were covering for one another on the defensive end and we were sharing the ball on offense and when we play like this, we’re tough to beat, not just in Dallas, but on any given night.”

The Kings held the Mavs to 41 percent shooting for the game, but in the second half, Dallas hit just 13-of-37 from the field (35.1 percent) and they turned the ball over 10 times.

Sacramento took advantage of the Mavericks miscues, scoring 34 points off of 23 total turnovers for the home team. They ran at every opportunity, outscoring Dallas 33-13 on fastbreak points on their way to the 31-point victory.

“I think we did a good job of playing together, good team defense, good ball movement, everybody got involved, so it was a good team effort all around,” DeMarcus Cousins told CSN California’s Kayte Christensen following the game.

Cousins got it going early, drawing fouls on the injury depleted frontline of the Mavericks. With starting center Andrew Bogut unavailable, Dallas had no choice but to send multiple bodies at Cousins and the big man made them pay.

With all of the attention focused his way, Cousins’ teammates cut to the hoop or found open spots on the perimeter leading to a team-high seven assists for the All-Star center. But he wasn’t the only one sharing the ball.

Six Kings players finished the night with three or more assists as Sacramento totalled 28 dimes in the drubbing. Not only did the Kings move the ball, but they hit their shots as well, finishing the night at 56 percent from the field and 45.5 percent from long range.

Cousins dropped in a team-high 24 points on 10-of-16 shooting. Rudy Gay and Darren Collison each finished the night with 19 and Garrett Temple went a perfect 4-of-4 from behind the arc on his way to 17 points off the bench.

The win snapped Sacramento’s three game losing streak and helped them finish the five-game trip at 2-3. While the Mavericks are a last place team missing plenty of rotational players, there are no easy games for the Kings, who are still in search of an identity on the court.

“Honestly, we’re just focused on playing the best basketball as a team,” Cousins said. “We’ve got our own problems on, we can’t really be focused on the next team, we’ve got to focus on ourselves right now.”

The team flew home following the game, landing in Sacramento overnight. They face the New York Knicks on Friday night at Golden 1 Center before heading back out on the road Saturday to face the Utah Jazz at Vivint Smart Home Arena.

Ben McLemore sighting

It has been an up and down season for plenty of the Kings players as new head coach Dave Joerger searches for the right combination of players. Coming into Wednesday’s game against the Mavericks, fourth-year guard Ben McLemore had been buried on the bench, receiving three straight DNP-CDs and five in Sacramento’s first 20 games.

In an attempt to mix things up, Joerger turned to the 23-year-old guard to start the game, leaving veteran Arron Afflalo out of the rotation for the first time this season.

“It’s just an opportunity, I think he’s been waiting patiently, he’s worked his tail off, he’s kept his confidence,” Joerger said of McLemore. “He’s a pretty good athlete. He deserved this opportunity.”

McLemore struggled to find his rhythm, but still managed to score nine points on 3-of-11 shooting in 21 minutes of action. The high-flying shooting guard is averaging career-lows across the board, posting just 6.6 points and 1.3 rebounds in 15.9 minutes per game this season, but it appears he’s going to get another shot to figure things out on the court.

“Let’s take a look at him with this group for a little bit,” Joerger said of McLemore following the game.
 

Sharks' Schlemko 'doubtful' for Ducks, not expected to be out long term

Sharks' Schlemko 'doubtful' for Ducks, not expected to be out long term

SAN JOSE – David Schlemko’s right ankle injury isn’t expected to keep him out long term, but the defenseman’s status for the two Sharks games this weekend is in question.

San Jose faces Anaheim on Friday at Honda Center, and returns home on Saturday to host the Hurricanes.

“I would say doubtful for tomorrow, but getting better,” DeBoer said on Thursday.

Schlemko skated for the first time on Thursday at the Sharks’ practice facility since getting hurt in the Canadiens game last Friday. He returned in the third period after going down in the second, but quickly realized it was still too sore.

“It didn’t feel that bad once I came off and the x-rays were negative, so I thought I was fine to go [back in],” he said. “It started to hurt again late in the third, so I shut it down. 

“The next morning when you wake up and all the adrenaline is gone, it obviously hurts a lot more. We got the MRI and everything looks like it should be pretty good. Nothing long-term. I don’t think [I’ll miss] anything past this weekend, at the most. Hopefully I can get in for one or maybe both this weekend.”

In 24 games, Schlemko has five assists, 44 shots on goal and a plus-two rating. 

Dylan DeMelo would remain in the lineup if Schlemko can’t play against Anaheim. Mirco Mueller, who was called up on Wednesday, was reassigned to the Barracuda on Thursday morning.

The Sharks had yet to decide if anyone else would be recalled for the trip to Anaheim, according to DeBoer.

“We’re going to meet with [GM Doug Wilson] here right after and see what our numbers are,” DeBoer said.