Only one player elected to MLB Hall of Fame

637426.jpg

Only one player elected to MLB Hall of Fame

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Barry Larkin joined with Cal Ripken Jr. in transforming shortstop into a position for powerful bats, not just great gloves. Now he's following Ripken into the Hall of Fame. The former Cincinnati Reds shortstop was chosen on 495 of 573 ballots (86 percent) in voting announced Monday by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, well above the necessary 75 percent. "When I think of Barry, I think of a steady, smart and terrific all-around player both at shortstop and at the plate," Ripken said. "I wish we had played in the same league, but we were in 11 All-Star Games together and I always enjoyed being around him and talking baseball." Larkin will be inducted July 22 in Cooperstown along with the late Ron Santo, elected last month by the Veterans Committee. "I'm just incredibly, incredibly moved by this whole experience and so humbled by the experience and so excited about being the newest member of the Hall of Fame," he said on a conference call. His election came in the final year before the Steroids Era becomes the main focus in balloting. Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa, Mike Piazza, Craig Biggio and Curt Schilling are eligible for the first time next year. Jack Morris followed Larkin with 382 votes (67 percent), missing by 48 votes on his 13th try but up sharply from 54 percent last year. Morris, the ace of three World Series winners, finished with 254 victories and was the winningest pitcher of the 1980s. His 3.90 ERA, however, is higher than that of any Hall of Famer. He has two chances left on the BBWAA ballot. Gil Hodges (63.4 percent in 1983) has the highest percentage among players who never gained election. Playing from 1986-04 -- all with his hometown Reds -- Larkin hit .295 with 198 home runs, 960 RBIs, 2,340 hits and 379 stolen bases. A 12-time All-Star, he won the 1995 NL MVP award, nine Silver Slugger trophies and three Gold Gloves. He helped the Reds win the 1990 World Series and in 1996 became the first shortstop to have 30 homers and 30 steals in a season. "Barry distinguished himself as a tremendous leader and a dominating player," Reds great Johnny Bench said. "Winning a World Series and an MVP plus Gold Glove and Silver Slugger awards puts him among the elite players in Reds history." Larkin received 52 percent when he appeared on the ballot for the first time in 2010, then got 62 percent last year when he fell 75 votes short. This year, he received the largest single-year percentage increase to gain election since 1948, when pitcher Herb Pennock was elected with 77.7 percent, a year after finishing with 53.4 percent. Larkin is the 48th Hall of Famer who spent his entire career with one major league team and the third from the Reds, joining Bench and Bid McPhee. He credits Hall of Famer Tony Perez and Dave Concepcion for helping influence his career, and recalled fondly how he learned Spanish to better communicate with his teammates. "Now he's with us, another guy in the family," Perez said. With no big contenders among those in their first year of eligibility, several holdovers saw increases from last year: Jeff Bagwell (42 percent to 56 percent), Lee Smith (45 to 51), Tim Raines (38 to 49), Alan Trammell (24 to 37) and Edgar Martinez (33 to 37). Bernie Williams received the most votes (55) among players who were eligible for the first time. Bill Mueller got just four votes and will be dropped in future years, along with Juan Gonzalez (23) and Vinny Castilla (six). Nine voters submitted blank ballots. Mark McGwire, 10th on the career home run list with 583, received 19.5 percent in his sixth try, down from 19.8 percent last year and 23.7 percent in 2010 -- a vote before he admitted using steroids and human growth hormone. Rafael Palmeiro, among just four players with 500 homers and 3,000 hits along with Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Eddie Murray, got 72 votes and his percentage increased to 12.6 from 11 last year in his first appearance. Palmeiro received a 10-day suspension in 2005 for a positive test for performance-enhancing drugs, claiming it was due to a vitamin vial given to him by teammate Miguel Tejada. Gonzalez, a two-time AL MVP implicated by Jose Canseco in steroids use, received 30 votes last year, just above the 5 percent threshold for remaining on the ballot. In 2014, the focus will turn to elite pitchers when Greg Maddux (355 wins) and Tom Glavine (305) become eligible. Among pitchers eligible for the Hall, all 20 of the 300-game winners are in.

Source: Louis Riddick out of running for 49ers general manager

Source: Louis Riddick out of running for 49ers general manager

The 49ers on Wednesday informed multiple candidates for the team’s general manager position that they would not be brought back for second interviews, according to a team spokesman.

One of the individuals who did not make it past the first round of interviews is ESPN analyst Louis Riddick, a source told CSNBayArea.com.

Riddick was closely associated with coach candidate Josh McDaniels, the New England Patriots’ offensive coordinator. McDaniels removed himself from consideration for the team’s head-coaching opening on Monday. Riddick previously worked in the personnel departments of Washington and Philadelphia.

“The 49ers pared down its list of general manager candidates (Wednesday) morning and thanked those who will not be included in the second round of interviews,” 49ers spokeman Bob Lange posted on Twitter. “Upcoming interviews will be announced as they were in the first round.”

The 49ers will seek second interviews with Green Bay executives Brian Gutekunst and Eliot Wolf, along with Minnesota assistant general manager George Paton. Arizona vice president of player personnel Terry McDonough is also still believed to be in the mix.

One source described the 49ers’ general manager search as “fluid.” The 49ers are expected to formally offer Atlanta offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan the head-coaching position after the Falcons’ season has concluded.

The 49ers want to match a coach and general manager. Shanahan, if he officially accepts the 49ers’ offer, would likely be involved in the process to hire the 49ers’ next general manager.
 

Source: Packers execs on list of 49ers GM finalists

Source: Packers execs on list of 49ers GM finalists

Green Bay executives Brian Gutekunst and Eliot Wolf will be among the finalists to receive second interviews for the 49ers general manager position, a source told CSNBayArea.com on Wednesday morning.

Minnesota assistant general manager George Paton will also be among the finalists, reports the NFL Network, but a second interview with him has yet to be confirmed, a source said.

The 49ers are also expected to bring in another candidate or two for a second interview, a source said.

The second interviews are expected to take place after Sunday, when the Atlanta Falcons and Green Bay Packers play in the NFC Championship Game. The 49ers will have a second interview with Falcons offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan for the head-coaching position.

The 49ers are expected to make a formal offer to Shanahan to become the team’s next head coach, and the NFL Network reported Tuesday night it is “almost certain” he will accept. The 49ers will be allowed to speak with Shanahan next week, regardless of Sunday's outcome, but are not allowed to hire Shanahan until the Falcons' season is over. 

The 49ers interviewed nine candidates for the general manager position. Seattle co-director of player personnel Trent Kirchner removed his name from consideration on Tuesday.

Sources say that Kirchner and coach candidate Tom Cable, Seattle’s offensive line coach, were in serious talks with the 49ers on Tuesday about filling the organization’s top two positions. But Kirchner and Cable felt like they were being used as leverage to land Shanahan as the head coach.

The other general manager candidates who interviewed with 49ers executives Jed York and Paraag Marathe were Arizona vice president of player personnel Terry McDonough, Seattle co-director of player personnel Scott Fitterer, ESPN analyst Louis Riddick, Carolina assistant general manager Brandon Beane, Indianapolis vice president of football operations Jimmy Raye III.

Gutekunst, 43, is in his 18th season with the Green Bay and his first as director of player personnel. He and Wolf originally interviewed with the 49ers on Jan. 5.

Gutekunst received a new title prior to last season after Packers general manager Ted Thompson denied permission for him to interview for the director of player personnel job with the Tennessee Titans. He was also denied from joining the Philadelphia Eagles’ personnel department in 2015 during Chip Kelly’s tenure with the team.

Wolf, 32, is in his first season as Green Bay’s director of football operations after receiving a promotion after being denied an opportunity to interview with the Detroit Lions last year.

Wolf is the son Hall of Fame executive Ron Wolf. He has also worked closely through the years with current NFL general managers Reggie McKenzie, John Schneider and John Dorsey.