Reggie Jackson apologizes for his comments

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Reggie Jackson apologizes for his comments

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Reggie Jackson says he messed up by disparaging Alex Rodriguez, Gary Carter and other big names in baseball and has been reaching out to make apologies. Jackson had told Sports Illustrated that Rodriguez's statistics were tainted by the Yankees star's admitted use of performance-enhancing drugs. Jackson also said he didn't see Carter, Kirby Puckett, Phil Niekro, Don Sutton and Jim Rice as Hall of Famers. Jackson is a special adviser with the New York Yankees. The team released a statement Thursday from the Hall of Fame slugger. "In trying to convey my feelings about a few issues that I am passionate about, I made the mistake of naming some specific players," Jackson said. "This was inappropriate and unfair to those players, some of which are very close friends of mine. I think there are ways to speak from the heart without hurting people, and I'm disappointed that I didn't take greater care in expressing my views," he added. The Yankees had told Jackson to stay away from the clubhouse and team events following his pointed remarks to the magazine, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press earlier this week. Jackson was expected to steer clear for several weeks, the person told the AP on condition of anonymity because there was no formal announcement. Jackson was not disciplined or fined, and was to remain a special adviser. "I have been proactively reaching out to make personal apologies to those within the Hall of Fame community that I offended, and to the Yankees organization for any disruption that I caused in the clubhouse," Jackson said in his statement. "I continue to have a strong relationship with the club, and look forward to continuing in my role with the team," he said.

NBA Gameday: Kings in Big Apple, look to slow down Porzingis, Knicks

NBA Gameday: Kings in Big Apple, look to slow down Porzingis, Knicks

The Sacramento Kings hit the Big Apple Sunday evening in hopes of snapping their two-game losing streak. Standing in there way is a rebuilt and reinvigorated New York Knicks team.

DeMarcus Cousins had his four-game streak of games with 30 or more points snapped Friday night. He finished the game with 28, but he missed a two-minute stretch in the mid-fourth quarter with a cut next to his right eye that required eight stitches after the loss to the Celtics.

New York is coming off back-to-back wins over the Minnesota Timberwolves and they are 7-3 over their last 10. Carmelo Anthony leads the way, averaging 22.6 points per game, but second-year big Kristaps Porzingis and veteran Derrick Rose are both posting big numbers under head coach Jeff Hornacek.

OPENING LINE:
Knicks by 2

MATCHUP TO WATCH:
Rudy Gay vs. Carmelo Anthony -- These two grew up in the same area of Maryland and know each other very well. After a quick start to the season, Gay’s numbers have dropped over Sacramento’s last eight games. He comes in averaging 19.2 points and 6.4 rebounds in 34.7 minutes per game. Anthony hasn’t showed any signs of slowing in year 14. The 11-time All-Star is a tough cover and Gay will have his hands full.

WHERE THEY STAND:
Kings: 7-12, fourth place in Pacific

Knicks: 10-9, third place in Atlantic

INJURY REPORT:
Kings: No injuries to report.

Knicks: C Joakim Noah (ankle) questionable, Courtney Lee (ankle) questionable.

SERIES HISTORY:
Sacramento swept the Knicks last year 2-0 in the season series. The Kings hold a 153-142 advantage over the Knicks all-time, but New York leads 33-29 during the Sacramento-era.

QUOTE:
“If we don’t figure this thing out, we’re going to continue to have these types of games and just another losing season.” -DeMarcus Cousins following the Kings loss in Boston on Friday night

Suns' Watson counters Kerr, preaches caution with marijuana rhetoric

Suns' Watson counters Kerr, preaches caution with marijuana rhetoric

While players like Draymond Green, Klay Thompson and Andrew Bogut offered support for Steve Kerr on Saturday, one NBA coach wants to pump the breaks on the conversation surrounding marijuana use.

Suns coach Earl Watson preached caution during an interview with ESPN after the Warriors beat Phoenix 138-109 on Saturday night.

"I think our rhetoric on it has to be very careful because you have a lot of kids where I'm from that's reading this, and they think [marijuana use is] cool. It's not cool. Where I'm from, you don't get six fouls to foul out. You get three strikes. One strike leads to another. I'm just being honest with you, so you have to be very careful with your rhetoric," Watson told Chris Haynes.

Watson doesn't appear to be a fan of Kerr advocating for the use of marijuana.

"I think it would have to come from a physician -- not a coach. And for me, I've lived in that other life [of crime and drugs]. I'm from that area, so I've seen a lot of guys go through that experience of using it and doing other things with that were both illegal. And a lot of those times, those guys never make it to the NBA, they never make it to college, and somehow it leads to something else, and they never make it past 18," Watson told Haynes.

Watson highlighted a potential problem of leagues legalizing the use of marijuana.

"So when we really talk about it and we open up that, I call it that slippery slope. We have to be very careful on the rhetoric and how we speak on it and how we express it and explain it to the youth," Watson said.

Watson finished the interview with a message for the kids who might have been emboldened by Kerr's comments.

"I've never been a fan of the use, but I'm also not a medical doctor. So for the kids who are reading this and they might take the headlines and run with it, don't run anywhere with it. Understand that if you're from an environment or social area where a lot of luck and a lot of blessings is your only way out, you cannot risk that opportunity ever. Ever. It's just the way it is. It's not the same everywhere. I don't know as far as the pain [and how marijuana could help], but I think we have to be careful how we present that to the public," Watson said.