Sanchez loses control; Giants fail to sweep Mets

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Sanchez loses control; Giants fail to sweep Mets

May 5, 2011BOXSCORE GIANTSVIDEOMLBPAGE MLBSCOREBOARD

NEW YORK (AP) Mike Pelfrey pitched into the eighth inning against San Francisco's limited lineup, Carlos Beltran homered and the New York Mets averted a Giants sweep with a 5-2 win Thursday.San Francisco loaded the bases with one out in the ninth against Francisco Rodriguez, but Miguel Tejada struck out and pinch-hitter Buster Posey grounded out.Jose Reyes lined a two-run triple and the Mets took advantage of more wildness from Jonathan Sanchez (2-2) to win for the second time in seven games.Pelfrey (2-3), expected to be the Mets' ace while injured Johan Santana recovers this year, began the day with a 7.39 ERA. He gave up one earned run and four hits in 7 2-3 innings.Rodriguez got four outs and hung on for his seventh save.The Giants were trying to sweep the Mets for the first time since 2002. But they also were finishing up a stretch where they played 16 of 19 games on the road, and hardly looked like the defending World Series champions.Posey and Pat Burrell did not start and Freddy Sanchez sat with a sore right thumb. Minus several other injured players, the Giants slipped back under .500 at 15-16.Mike Fontenot homered with two outs in the fourth for San Francisco's first hit. The Giants' fill-in No. 3 hitter sent a drive into the second deck in right field - a fan up there made a hefty heave, tossing the souvenir nearly all the way back to first baseman Ike Davis. An inning earlier, Mets second baseman Chin-lung Hu missed Davis by nearly 10 feet with a wild throw on a routine play.Known for his shaky control, Sanchez walked six while giving up five runs and five hits in five innings. Beltran hit a two-run homer in the fifth for a 5-2 lead.The Mets scored three times in the second, taking advantage when Sanchez couldn't find the strike zone and San Francisco outfielders couldn't corral the ball.Jason Bay, fresh off the paternity leave list, opened with a double that bounced from the glove of diving left fielder Cody Ross. Davis followed with a looper that fell a step in front of Ross for a single.Ronny Paulino's double-play grounder scored a run and Sanchez walked Scott Hairston - batting .176 this season - and Pelfrey, a career .090 hitter. Jose Reyes followed with a liner that skipped just beyond center fielder Aaron Rowand for a two-run triple and a 3-0 lead.A day after his name surfaced in a Mets-to-Giants trade rumor, Reyes had a mixed afternoon. The All-Star shortstop streaked around the bases on his triple, but argued after being called out on strikes to end the fourth, then made a throwing error on the first play in the fifth.Sanchez was all around the plate with his pitching and hitting, and that wasn't always a good thing for him.Along with his early walks, Sanchez stood in the batter's box after trying to put down a sacrifice bunt, thinking it was foul - he looked at plate umpire Eric Cooper while the Giants turned an easy double play.Sanchez hit an RBI single the next time up.NOTES: All five of Beltran's home runs this season have come at Citi Field. ... Fontenot hit one homer in a combined 240 at-bats last year with the Giants and Cubs. ... The last 13 Giants games have been decided by three runs or fewer. ... Pelfrey and Ross each took big swings and helicoptered bats into the front row behind San Francisco's third-base dugout. No one was hurt. ... Dodgers star Andre Ethier brings his 29-game hitting streak into Citi Field on Friday night. Jonathon Niese starts for the Mets.

49ers' Buckner selected to All-Rookie team

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49ers' Buckner selected to All-Rookie team

San Francisco 49ers defensive lineman DeForest Buckner on Monday was selected to the NFL's All-Rookie team in a vote of the Pro Football Writers of America.

Defensive end Joey Bosa of the Chargers was named Defensive Rookie of the Year. Running back Ezekiel Elliott of the Dallas Cowboys was named Rookie of the Year and Offensive Rookie of the Year.

Buckner, the 49ers’ No. 7 overall pick from Oregon, started all 15 games in which he appeared. He ranked second among all NFL defensive tackles with 73 tackles on the season. He finished with six sacks, ranking fourth in the NFL among rookies.

2016 PFWA ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: RB Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys
2016 PFWA OFFENSIVE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: RB Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys
2016 PFWA DEFENSIVE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: DE Joey Bosa, San Diego Chargers
 

2016 PFWA ALL-ROOKIE TEAM
Offense
QB – Dak Prescott, Dallas Cowboys
RB – Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys; Jordan Howard, Chicago Bears
Sterling Shepard, New York Giants; Michael Thomas, New Orleans Saints
TE – Hunter Henry, San Diego Chargers
C – Cody Whitehair, Chicago Bears
G – Joe Thuney, New England Patriots; Laremy Tunsil, Miami Dolphins
T – Jack Conklin, Tennessee Titans; Taylor Decker, Detroit Lions
Defense
DL – Joey Bosa, San Diego Chargers; DeForest Buckner, San Francisco 49ers; Chris Jones, Kansas City Chiefs; Yannick Ngakoue, Jacksonville Jaguars
LB – Jatavis Brown, San Diego Chargers; Leonard Floyd, Chicago Bears; Deion Jones, Atlanta Falcons
CB – Vernon Hargreaves III, Tampa Bay Buccaneers; Jalen Ramsey, Jacksonville Jaguars
S – Karl Joseph, Oakland Raiders; Keanu Neal, Atlanta Falcons
Special Teams
PK – Wil Lutz, New Orleans Saints
P – Riley Dixon, Denver Broncos
KR – Tyreek Hill, Kansas City Chiefs
PR – Tyreek Hill, Kansas City Chiefs
ST – Tyreek Hill, Kansas City Chiefs

Hall of Fame voters' biggest issue: Do they work for the job or the sport?

Hall of Fame voters' biggest issue: Do they work for the job or the sport?

With Jeff Bagwell and Tim Raines, and maybe even Trevor Hoffman about to be voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, we have re-entered the hellish debates about who should vote, and why they should vote, and whether needles are good or bad and whether both are trumped by cashing the checks those needles made possible and why being transparent about their votes is good and why being transparent about their votes is actually bad.
 
In other words, the Hall of Fame isn’t actually about players any more. It’s about the voters.
 
The Danes call this “rampant narcissism.”
 
We have danced around this central fact for years now, hiding behind debates about performance enhancing drugs and the profiting thereof, voting limits and their degree of strangling artificiality, and the new writers vs. the old veterans, and who should be vilified, justifiably or otherwise, by whom.
 
Yay hatred by proxy!
 
But the process arguments ultimately aren’t the central point here. The argument is really about something more basic.
 
Are voter/journalists supposed to help enhance the mythology of the sport, or dispassionately tell its story? Who are they working for when they vote?

To that end, every vote tells a story well beyond the names checked off or the blank ballots submitted. One man, Ryan Thibodaux (@NotMrTibbs, to you), has been invaluable in delving into the voting minutiae from the growing number of voters who release their opinions early. But, and he’ll admit this if you strike him often enough, that’s still a process discussion, and the core of the debate is found elsewhere.
 
Baseball writers are like football writers and basketball writers and hockey writers and curling writers and blah-blah-blah-de-blah-blah, in that they are prone to love the sports they cover beyond their journalistic mandate. That’s probably true of most journalists in most fields, but baseball has the Hall of Fame outlet to allow this internal debate to play itself out before our faces.
 
So the question becomes whether their votes are the representation of dispassionate analysis, or a defense of the mythos of the sport and the concept of the Hall itself. Boiled down to its essence, who are the voters defending here, the sanctity of the myth, or the ugliness of the reality?
 
The answer, as it usually is, is, “Depends on who you talk to.”
 
Hall of Fame debates usually lump all voters into one amorphous blob, a level of lazy and stupid thinking that should in a more perfect world be punishable by death. Okay, we kid. Life on a Louisiana prison farm, with parole after 25 years.
 
In fact, voters cover a fairly wide swath of opinion, and for whatever perceived shortcomings they might have, there are enough of them (about 450) to be a fairly accurate measure of the diaspora of baseball opinion across social, cultural, sporting and chronological lines.
 
But the argument about whether an individual voter feels more responsible to the job he or she is paid to do or to the game he or she covers as part of that job remains largely unconsidered, or at the very least masked by other considerations.
 
This manifests itself all the way down to the hot-pocket word “cheating.” Baseball is about cheating, and about honor. It’s about racism, and trying to overcome it. It’s about greed, and selflessness. It’s a sport, and it’s a business. It’s America, in all its glorious and hideous manifestations. To employ “cheating” as a word is in itself dishonest, and given that everyone got rich off the PED era and kept all the money they made makes PED use a de facto workplace condition approved by management and labor.
 
That may be unsavory, and it certainly is illegal without a proper doctor’s prescription, but because by their inaction the owners decided not to punish it (and in fact chose to reward it with contracts and extensions for users even after testing was instituted), it isn’t “cheating.”
 
And even if that argument doesn’t heat your rec room, it isn’t the role of the writer to punish it. It is the role of the writer to reveal it by journalism means, but that’s where the journalist’s role ends. The people who ran baseball took the journalism, acknowledged it, and did nothing until it ramped up detection and did little other than blame the union for a failing that both sides share equally.
 
So in the end, Raines’ votes or Barry Bonds’ votes or Curt Schilling’s votes or Edgar Martinez’ votes are fun to debate, but they aren’t the issue. It’s whether the voters think when they sit down and confront their ballot every year who exactly they’re working for – the job, or the sport.
 
And yes, I vote. Voted for the maximum 10. You’ll find out tomorrow the contents of my ballot. Then you can make that a process story, too.