Stanford makes it official -- Shaw new football coach

Stanford makes it official -- Shaw new football coach

Jan. 13, 2011

STANFORD PAGE

David Shaw Named Bradford M. Freeman Director of FootballHead Coach

Shaw Has Served as Stanfords Offensive Coordinator the Last Four Seasons

STANFORD, Calif. -- Stanfords Jaquish & Kenninger Director of Athletics Bob Bowlsby has appointed David Shaw 95 to the position of Bradford M. Freeman Director of Football Head Coach.

Shaw, 38, becomes the 34th head coach in Stanford history and the first alum to lead the program since Paul Wiggin (1980-83).

David Shaw is exactly the right person to lead our football program at this time, said Bowlsby. David has the experience, intellect, coaching skills and organizational abilities to be a tremendous head coach. He understands and embraces the combination of world class academics and world class athletics that is required at Stanford.

David has made a substantial contribution to the recent success of our program and our team has great confidence in him. I could not be more excited to work with David and to assist him and his staff in leading our football program to high achievement in the years ahead.

As the teams offensive coordinator the last four seasons, Shaw played an instrumental role in the resurgence of the Stanford program which has established school scoring records each of the last two seasons.

Stanford was the ninth-highest scoring team in the nation this season, averaging 40.31 points a game, scoring a school-record 524 points during its 12-1 season which culminated with a victory over Virginia Tech in the 2011 Orange Bowl. The point total surpassed the previous record of 461, established by the 2009 team.

During Shaws tenure as offensive coordinator, the Cardinal scored 40 or more points in 11 games since the 2007 season, including 10 times over the past two campaigns.

Even though it was Stanfords passing game that drew most of the attention this past season, the Cardinal running game flourished under Shaws tutelage. Despite the loss of consensus All-American and Heisman Trophy runner-up Toby Gerhart, Stanford averaged 213.77 yards on the ground, which ranked second in the Pac-10 and 17th nationally. The Cardinal amassed 2,779 yards on the ground this season, which was the second-highest rushing total in school history.

Shaw tutored five running backs Stepfan Taylor, Anthony Wilkerson, Tyler Gaffney, Usua Amanam and Jeremy Stewart that combined to rush for 2,063 yards in 13 games, an average of 158.6 yards a game. Last season, Gerhart averaged 143.9 yards per game while Stanford as a team averaged 218.2 yards on the ground.

Taylors final rushing total of 1,137 yards was the second highest total in school history, trailing only Gerharts senior total of 1,871.

Shaw joined the Stanford coaching staff in 2007 as the teams offensive coordinator after serving in the same capacity at the University of San Diego. In 2006, the Toreros led the nation in total offense en route to capturing the Pioneer League championship and NCAA Division I-AA Mid-Major national title.

The 2006 squad finished 11-1 overall and led all NCAA Division I-AA teams in passing offense (293.3 ypg), total offense (494.25 ypg) and scoring offense (42.83 ppg). Quarterback Josh Johnson was one of four offensive All-Americans on the team and led all NCAA Division I-AA quarterbacks in passing efficiency (169.0 quarterback rating), touchdown passes (34, co-leader), points responsible for (24.33 ppg) and total offense (336.7 ypg), while throwing for 3,320 yards to also lead the country and running for another 721 on the ground. He added 11 rushing touchdowns and even caught one TD pass.

Shaw also has nine years of NFL coaching experience with the Philadelphia Eagles (1997), Oakland Raiders (1998-2001) and Baltimore Ravens (2002-05).

Shaw's most recent coaching job in the NFL with Baltimore included a stint as the quarterbacks and wide receivers coach from 2002-04 before working solely with the wide receivers in 2005. His tenure included a 2003 campaign that reaped an AFC North title and a 10-6 regular season record. Derrick Mason set a new franchise record with 86 receptions under Shaw's tutelage in 2005 when he also posted the third-biggest season to date in terms of receiving yards with 1,073. Mark Clayton set a franchise rookie record for receptions in 2005 when he caught 44 balls for 471 yards.

After three seasons of quality control with the Oakland Raiders from 1998-2000, Shaw moved into the role of quarterbacks coach in 2001 as the Raiders won a second straight AFC West title and finished the regular season with a 10-6 mark. Quarterback Rich Gannon made the NFL Pro Bowl for the second straight season and ended up as the game's MVP. Gannon had the third-most prolific campaign of his 16-year pro career during the 2001 regular season, throwing for 3,828 yards on 361-of-549 passing (65.8).

Shaw began his NFL coaching career as the quality control with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1997.

Shaw began his coaching career at Western Washington, where he coached the outside linebackers in 1995 and the tight ends in 1996.

A four-year letterwinner at Stanford from 1991-94 as a receiver, Shaw was a member of Stanford's 1991 Aloha Bowl team coached by Dennis Green that finished the season with an 8-4 mark and was the third-highest scoring team in school history. He was also on the Cardinal's 1992 Blockbuster Bowl winning squad coached by Bill Walsh that had a 10-3 overall mark. Shaw finished his Stanford career with 57 catches for 664 yards and five touchdowns.

Davids father, Willie, was an assistant coach at Stanford from 1974-76 and again from 1989-91. He coached for a total of 33 seasons, including 15 in the NFL with the Detroit Lions, Kansas City Chiefs, Minnesota Vikings, New Orleans Saints, Oakland Raiders, San Diego Chargers and St. Louis Rams.

Shaw also competed in a varsity track meet and a varsity basketball game while at Stanford before graduating in 1995 with a bachelor's degree in sociology.

A native of Union City, Calif., David and his wife, Kori are the parents of three children, Carter, Keegan and Gavin.
Courtesy of Stanford media relations.

Carr takes responsibility for poor Raiders passing game, 'We played awful'

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Carr takes responsibility for poor Raiders passing game, 'We played awful'

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Derek Carr has made 44 starts as Raiders quarterback. They all haven’t been pretty. Most of them have, but the 25-year has hit a few bumps during what is generally considered a sterling start to his career.

He threw some costly interceptions in 2015, and was learning on the job as a rookie. He’s been nothing short of awesome this season. Until Thursday night, certainly one of his worst as a professional.

Ponder this stat line: 17-for-41, 117 passing yards, no touchdowns, no picks. His 49.1 passer rating was career low.

That’s un-Carr-like, to say the least.

While his receivers dropped four passes, and there were many others not in the tally that should’ve been caught. Special teams made some costly mistakes and the defense had some first-half lapses.

Carr wasn’t afraid to say quarterback play had a huge impact on a 21-13 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs, a nationally televised game that dropped the Raiders to 10-3 and into second-place in the AFC West.

“It was definitely a bad night, no way of getting around that,” Carr said. “I hate to have a bad night coming on this one, out of all the games we’ve had. Obviously, we didn’t do enough. We all turns.

“I feel very responsible for that because of being the leader of the offense and the team. I feel sick to my stomach when we put something like that out there on film. It hurts, I can promise you that. I put too much time into this to go do something like that.”

Carr didn’t want to make excuses after this loss. He didn’t blame his right pinky, which he dislocated in two places against Carolina, which still causes discomfort.

“It definitely wasn’t the finger’s fault,” Carr said.

He didn’t blame frigid temperatures, or whether that had an effect on his grip or his ailing digit. It certainly might have, but the Raiders quarterback never plays the blame game.

Despite the passing game’s struggles, Latavius Murray ran well and the defense clamped down in the second half. That kept the Raiders down one score most of the second half, but they couldn’t cross the goal line.

The Raiders had more than eight minutes to put a game-trying drive together, but stalled at the Kansas City 19-yard line and turned it over on downs.

Carr put one touchdown drive together, late in the first half that made it 21-10. The defense forced two turnovers in the red zone early in the third quarter, but the Raiders only got three points from those opportunities.

That, much like everything else that happened in the passing game, was uncharacteristic of an explosive unit.

“Everything about tonight was unusual, to be honest,” Carr said. “To have our defense step up for us and make plays, and for us to go out there and not execute, do things we don’t do… That’s why it’s frustrating. That why I promise you I’m not worried.

“We played awful. It wasn’t good enough, but I’m not worried because I know the guys in the locker room. I’m not worried one bit, but it just sucks. We have to take it. We have to take the punch, but I’m not worried. I think we’re going to bounce back.”

Raiders' magic dissipates, but valuable lesson about contending learned

Raiders' magic dissipates, but valuable lesson about contending learned

So the Oakland Raiders are good, but not magical, let alone soaked in destiny. So they can make every game a hard slog for the opponent, but they are not invulnerable. So they can be inefficient, and too sure of themselves, and terribly wasteful when they’re cold.

In other words, they are part of the National Football League – no longer too good to be true.

Their performance against the Chiefs in Kansas City was a pyramid of blown opportunities, opportunities made necessary by a terrible start. A week ago, against a borderline playoff team, they could get away with it. Thursday, on hostile ground, against a team that has lost three of its previous 23 regular season games and has a defense that specializes in standing on your chest until you whistle Yankee Doodle through your navel, they couldn’t.

The result of the 21-13 loss in a game with 12 more points than degrees of temperature is that the Raiders are now the fifth-best team in the American Football Conference rather than the first-best team with four more chances to change that position.

In other words, Thursday’s defeat only provided this much wisdom: The Raiders are a good team vulnerable to other good teams with an iron-plated sense of purpose, stubborn defenses that can apply and maintain a chokehold for hours on end, and offenses that don’t feel compelled to imitate Oakland’s offense by getting into a shootout.

And also this: There is nothing that would necessarily prevent them from beating the Chiefs in case of a third match, even though Kansas City held them to fewer points in two games than they scored in every other game save one. They are still, as the pedants say, “in the argument.”

But they have flaws to be exposed against the right team in the right situation. Kansas City has been that team twice, and New England probably is, but there the list probably stops. Nobody in the AFC North or South seems terribly capable of matching them in neutral conditions, but here’s the other bone spur:

The playoffs are not about neutral conditions.

The Raiders have come a long way in what most people think is a long time, but in fact in terms of team construction, you can throw out everything before 2013, and almost everything before 2015. They are just now getting a full understanding of the hardest part of becoming a Super Bowl contender – the other Super Bowl contenders.

Yes, Kansas City has an indifferent playoff history under Andy Reid, but it is clear that under current conditions the Chiefs are serious players. And while we have no link to how the Raiders would fare against new England, we are pretty sure that they wouldn’t want to play the second weekend of January arse-deep in snow in Foxborough.

The point? Now they get how hard this contender stuff really is. They could not have learned that lesson any other way – not anyone they’ve played yet save Kansas City.

Their next lessons come in Weeks 16 and 17, when they face the frantically desperate Indianapolis Colts in Oakland and then the Broncos in Denver the week after. Desperate teams can be very difficult indeed, especially to teams that are safe and dry and home, playoff-wise.

And then there are the actual playoffs, which if they were played today would have the Raiders traveling to Houston for a very winnable game against the stultifying Texans. The week after, they could be either in Kansas City again or in New England, getting a gut full of visiting field disadvantage.

But as a learning experience, the Raiders may have come out very well indeed. They now know in very real and personal ways the real difference between where they think they should be and where they are, as well as how many ways this can go terribly wrong between now and then.

And also how well it can go, if they learn what the Chiefs taught them again Thursday.