Suspended NFL player arrested on drug charge


Suspended NFL player arrested on drug charge

From Comcast SportsNet HOUSTON (AP) -- Suspended Green Bay Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly has been arrested and charged with drug possession and tampering with evidence. Jolly remained in the Harris County jail Monday after being charged Saturday with possession of a compound containing codeine. Records show he also was charged with attempting to conceal the substance from investigators. A Harris County sheriff's spokeswoman said no attorney was listed for Jolly and that a bond had not been set. Jolly received probation in April after pleading guilty to a 2008 charge of possessing codeine. The deal allowed a similar charge from March to be dropped. Jolly grew up in Houston and attended Texas A&M. He was suspended indefinitely by the NFL in July 2010 and did not play for the Packers during their Super Bowl-winning season.

Injury report: 49ers, Buccaneers without their top running backs

Injury report: 49ers, Buccaneers without their top running backs

The 49ers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers will be without their top running backs on Sunday when the teams meet at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara.

The 49ers on Friday officially ruled out running back Carlos Hyde from participating in the game due to a right shoulder injury he sustained in the 49ers’ 45-16 loss to the Buffalo Bills. The Buccaneers also announced running back Doug Martin would be unavailable because of a hamstring injury.

Hyde leads the 49ers with 429 yards and six touchdowns on 109 rushing attempts. Mike Davis and Shaun Draughn are expected to fill in for Hyde. The club is also expected to promote DuJuan Harris from the practice squad to be available.

Cornerback Rashard Robinson is listed as questionable, along with wide receiver Torrey Smith (back) and defensive tackle Glenn Dorsey (knee). Robinson continues to go through the league’s concussion return-to-play protocol.

Cornerback Jimmie Ward has been cleared for action. He is expected to return after a three-week absence due to a right quadriceps strain.

49ers injury report
RB Carlos Hyde (shoulder)

DT Glenn Dorsey (knee)
CB Rashard Robinson (concussion)
WR Torrey Smith (back)

Buccaneers injury report
DE Robert Ayers (ankle)
RB Doug Martin (hamstring)
DT Clinton McDonald (hamstring)

Questionable CB Jude Adjei-Barimah (knee)
C Joe Hawley (knee)
DT Gerald McCoy (calf)
WR Cecil Shorts (hamstring),
TE Luke Stocker (ankle)

WNBA: Ogwumike's game-winning shot should not have counted


WNBA: Ogwumike's game-winning shot should not have counted

NEW YORK -- For the second consecutive WNBA Finals game, the league acknowledged a late officiating mistake.

The WNBA said the officials missed a shot clock violation in the deciding Game 5 Thursday night in which the Los Angeles Sparks beat the Minnesota Lynx 77-76.

"After reviewing postgame video, we have determined that Nneka Ogwumike's shot with 1:14 remaining in regulation time should not have counted due to a shot-clock violation, and that the referees improperly failed to review the play under the instant replay rules," Renee Brown, WNBA chief of basketball operations and player relations, said in a statement Friday.

Ogwumike's jumper with 3.1 seconds left, off the rebound of her blocked shot, won it for the Sparks.

The league also admitted a mistake after officials missed an 8-second violation call in Game 4 that occurred late in that contest.

Minnesota coach Cheryl Reeve was angry in her postgame news conference Thursday night about both missed calls, saying the league needed to do more than just apologize and "send a memo."

"It's really unfortunate that players continually put themselves out there, playing and competing at a really high level. Whether it was the 8-second call in LA or the game today, doesn't matter, OK? The game today, it's not fair to the players," Reeve said. "It's not enough just to apologize or send out a memo that they got something wrong, OK? These players are so invested and something must be done about the officiating in this league because it's not fair to these great players we have."

WNBA rules state that in the final two minutes of a game plays are reviewable only immediately. Earlier in the game, time can elapse and plays can still be reviewed. In college basketball, officials are given more time to review calls in the final two minutes.

"It was reviewable at the time when she shot it," Reeve said. "The referees at that point didn't think anything was wrong. They didn't understand it was the end of the clock. They didn't hear the shot clock. When they put the ball in play, the play is no longer reviewable."

Arenas switched shot clocks midseason and there were some issues when they were changed about how audible the horn was when it reached zero.

This wasn't the first year officiating mistakes happened in playoff games. Last season, in the Western Conference finals, the Lynx were aided by a foul with 1.5 seconds left in a tie game against Phoenix. The league acknowledged the call should never have been made.

"It's unfortunate we're having this discussion," Reeve said. "The number of people that have contacted us and said this shot was no good, it's unfortunate. I mean, I don't know what happens from there. Maybe they still win. I don't know. That's why I don't want to take anything away from LA."

Lynx star Maya Moore didn't realize the controversy until asked about it in a sullen losing locker room.

"OK, that doesn't make me feel any better," Moore said.

She said she thought she saw one of the officials signal for a review and was surprised to hear that didn't occur, the details of the final minutes lost in the haze of defeat.

"Well, it doesn't mean anything now," Moore said.