Tip led to arrest of suspect in Bryan Stow attack


Tip led to arrest of suspect in Bryan Stow attack


LOS ANGELES (APCSN) -- A tip from a parole officer led to the arrest of one of the suspects in the attack on Giants fan Bryan Stow outside Dodger Stadium after the rival teams' season opener, a brutal beating that prompted an outpouring of support for the victim and outrage in the sports world and beyond.

The suspect was identified by LAPD as 31-year-old Giovanni Ramirez of Los Angeles. He has been booked for assault with a deadly weapon and is being held on 1 million bail. It is unknown if Ramirez had hired an attorney, and police released no further information on him.
Ramirez, who was detained early Sunday, is believed to be the "main aggressor'' in the March 31 beating that left Stow with brain damage, Los Angeles Chief Charlie Beck said at an afternoon news conference at the stadium.
RELATED: Giants issue statement

Stow is a Santa Cruz resident. He's in critical condition at San Francisco General Hospital.

An emotional Beck hailed the work of 20 full-time detectives who he said have pursued 630 leads in the case so far. The police chief choked back tears as he described getting a call at 7 a.m. Sunday from Assistant Chief Earl Paysinger.

"He said the words I've been waiting for for seven weeks. He said that we had Bryan's assault suspect in custody,'' Beck said. "This is a huge step.''

It's unclear whether the others detained were possible witnesses or suspects in the March 31 beating that left Bryan Stow with brain damage, said police Sgt. Kunch, who declined to give his first name per department policy.

Several search warrants were served at an apartment building, Kunch said. Building manager Maritza Camacho told the Los Angeles Times that a SWAT team descended on the East Hollywood apartment using loudspeakers and with guns drawn.

Among the people taken out of the building was a man with a bald head and tattoos on his neck and arms, Camacho said, a description that appeared to match the vague sketches released by police of one of the two suspects.

Stow, a 42-year-old paramedic and father of two, was beaten in a parking lot by two men in Dodgers gear after the season opener against the Giants. No arrests have been made.

Last week, doctors reported that Stow is able to open his eyes. Stow had been at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center since the attack that forced doctors to put him into a medically induced coma to avoid having seizures.

Police Chief Charlie Beck said recently that detectives are looking into about 500 leads in their search for the attackers. Rewards totaling more than 200,000 have been offered for information leading to the suspects' arrests.

Stow's sister said police called her family Sunday morning to inform them about the search warrants.

"I can't even tell you the emotions that we're going through right now,'' Bonnie Stow told KABC-TV, occasionally choking back tears. "To be excited is the least we can say.''

An outpouring of support for Stow included fundraisers that ranged from bowling tournaments to pasta dinners to donated services such as haircuts and fitness classes. The events are listed on the family's blog.

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee said after hearing the news Sunday he called Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to express his thanks for the efforts of LA authorities and to congratulate him.

"That sort of brutality is totally unacceptable,'' Lee said of the attack. "It's not only unacceptable, but needs to be dealt with. Our hearts are still open for a full recovery of Mr. Stow.''

Giants manager Bruce Bochy said he heard Sunday morning that a suspect was in custody.

"Great news. It's been hard on the family,'' Bochy said before the Giants hosted Oakland. "For them to work as hard as they have been, I'm talking about the police department, to have a suspect in hand is great news. Hopefully they'll catch everybody who was involved in this senseless act.''

Giants team officials also released a statement commending Los Angeles police and thanking "the community for its tremendous support for the Stow family during this difficult time.''

Giants fan Les Wong, 37 of San Francisco celebrated the news as he headed to the game.

"It's good to hear that they caught someone. That kind of thing doesn't belong in sports,'' said Wong, who was wearing a Giants hat and Giants t-shirt. "I'm glad to hear there is going to be some sort of justice.''

Stow, who was wearing Giants gear, was leaving the game at Dodger Stadium with two friends when he was attacked. Moments earlier, Stow texted a family member to say he feared for his safety in the rowdy crowd.

Following the attack, Beck beefed up security at Dodger Stadium to deal with fights that had been breaking out at games in recent years.

Baseball fans have complained that anyone who dares to wear a rival team's jersey on Dodger turf has too-often been subjected to profane verbal abuse and threats of violence.

Chip Kelly reveals why 49ers going with slower-paced offense

Chip Kelly reveals why 49ers going with slower-paced offense

Chip Kelly's offense with the 49ers is his slowest-paced version of his four NFL seasons.


“I think that’s what fits with this group of guys we have on the offensive side of the ball,” Kelly said this week.

Kelly did not expound on that thought. But it could be safe to assume his thinking is the same reason why it does not make sense to enter a Ford Pinto to race against pro stock dragsters.

The 49ers’ offense is running more plays this season. The 49ers snap the ball every 24.4 seconds on offense. That’s down from 26.1 seconds last season, and 29.7 seconds in Jim Harbaugh’s final season in 2014.

Last season in Philadelphia, Kelly’s team snapped the ball every 22.6 seconds. In Kelly’s final season at Oregon in 2012, the Ducks snapped the ball every 20.5 seconds.

“I don’t think we’re playing fast right now,” Kelly said. “So if someone said, ‘How are you playing offensively?’ I don’t think we’re playing fast offensively. I think we’re just not going back (to huddle). We’re saving seven yards of run time for our offensive line because they don’t have to run back in the huddle, get a play called and then do it.

“We’re just calling it at the line of scrimmage. So I think it’s a lot of what Denver used to do when Peyton (Manning) was there. But there’s a lot of times that we’re under 15 seconds when we’re snapping the ball and getting the play off. So we’re not playing fast and we’re not calling tempo-type plays in those situations. We’re just calling plays.”

Kelly said part of the problem is that the 49ers are not converting third downs. The team has a 36.3 percent success rate on third downs, which is actually an improvement over the 30.5 percent success of last season.

But the 49ers’ overall lack of offensive success this season cannot be camouflaged.

The 49ers are averaging just 4.5 yards per play. The 49ers have not averaged fewer than 5 yards per play since 2007, when Alex Smith sustained a shoulder injury and was replaced by Trent Dilfer.

While the 49ers are running more offensive plays than it has in the past, so is the opposition. The 49ers have averaged 64.3 plays per game. The 49ers have defended 69.9 plays per game – only 2.3 more plays than last season but 8.1 more plays than in 2014.

The biggest problem for the offense has been its run defense. The league’s worst run defense has surrendered 185.1 yards per game and is on pace to give up 2,962 yards this season, which would be the most in the NFL since the 1980 New Orleans Saints yielded 3,106 rushing yards.

Anybody offering to help Mark Davis actually trying to help themselves

Anybody offering to help Mark Davis actually trying to help themselves

It’s usually a good day for anyone who holds a billion dollar asset. I mean, your day is not going to end sitting alone with a microwave dinner in a two-room apartment unless you’re the sort of life-battered misanthrope who prefers your day to end that way.

On the other hand, there’s Mark Davis, who desperately wants to upgrade the surroundings of his billion-dollar company but is finding out that (a) he can’t do it alone, and that (b) anyone willing to help him wants him to surrender his company in exchange.

Put another way, imagine that you want to upgrade your home and go to the bank for a home improvement loan, but the bank will only agree if it can have your kitchen and both bathrooms. Or pretend that you are a very good sprinter who wants to become world-class, but the only trainers who will work with you want you to saw off your right leg as collateral and convince you that hopping is the new Fosbury Flop.

We will now wait while you try to imagine what would have to happen for you to develop sympathy for Mark Davis.

Anyway, the latest shoe store to drop on him is the story that Sheldon Adelson, the Las Vegas billionaire who has pledged $650 million to the stadium that would house the Las Vegas Raiders, says he is willing to pull his money out of the deal because Davis wants too much (which is billionaire for “is willing to give up too little”).

This comes after the news from Oakland that Fortress Investment, a multi-billion dollar company which is allegedly bankrolling Ronnie Lott’s pitch to buy the Coliseum and (presumably) a piece of the Raiders, has presented a term sheet to Oakland and Alameda County that it would like to be rushed for presentation to the NFL owners.

In other words, Davis needs money to improve his team’s business profile, and anyone offering to help is going to want a significant piece of the business he is trying to improve in exchange. And that includes his fellow NFL owners, who have to vote to approve his move to Las Vegas – while the fee for their votes has not yet been expressed, you may rest assured that they aren’t doing him any favors for free.

Again, check your sympathy at the door. He inherited the business, thereby giving him a level of entitlement most people do not have.

But his options are as curious as they are varied, they all have a time element, and they all have pros and cons – the biggest con, of course, being that almost all of them end in him losing control of the team over time.

LAS VEGAS: Adelson clearly wants a piece of the team in exchange for his 33 percent contribution to the proposed $1.9 billion plant (he hasn’t said so, but nobody is buying any other version of the nature of his role). Davis needs 24 votes from his wealthier brethren, but their actions in the January vote that put the Rams in Inglewood and stopped the Chargers and Raiders from going to Carson showed where their respect for Davis truly lies. To allow him to move without strings is unthinkable for them, and what they seem to want most of Davis to divest himself, even incrementally, from day-to-day control.

INGLEWOOD: He still has the option to join Stan Kroenke in the Los Angeles venture if San Diego owner Dean Spanos either wins the hotel tax measure that would fund his new stadium or loses and declines the option he still holds on Inglewood. But Kroenke is a well-known squeezer of delicates (thus explaining the reason Spanos doesn’t want to join him) and would be the dominant figure in that relationship, both financially and tactically. He could conceivably hold his 40-plus percent control of the team (though Kroenke would not be above muscling in on that, too) but he would no longer be master of his domain.

OAKLAND: He could do business with Fortress, although the city and county seem unimpressed with the offer and their obligations within it, and Fortress would want its own piece of the franchise in exchange. Or he could stay in the Coliseum, as much as he may hate the place, and profit-take forever. He may be angry at the city for not rolling over for him, and he has tried to deflect blame for the current conditions on the city’s refusal to jump to his song, but Mayor Libby Schaaf has seen no compelling reason to worry about that – not even polling numbers. Her position is clearly, “If he stays, he stays, if he leaves, he leaves, and I’m good either way.”

In other words, there is no perfect scenario for Davis in any of these options. He gets a new home but loses a chunk of the only thing that makes him famous and/or rich, or he stays in a city whose power brokers are unmoved by his demands for better treatment, thus costing him the leverage he needs for the thing he says he wants most.

On the other hand, he still has a billion-dollar team that in the worst-case scenario he could sell for $2 billion-plus if he could slap Las Vegas or Los Angeles in front of the nickname. So no, there is no good reason why you should expend a moment’s pity toward him.

So he can either roll the dice and aim for the stars, knowing that anyone offering to help him is actually offering to help themselves to his belongings, or he can sit back and get comfortable with doing (and getting) nothing at all.

This, then, is what an NFL owner without leverage to get whatever he wants looks like. Think of it as you would a sighting of a great white elk – a once-in-a-lifetime thing that will stay within view for only a very short time. Bring binoculars and plenty of water. You’ll want stories for your grandchildren.