Warriors acquire Murphy and draft pick from Nets


Warriors acquire Murphy and draft pick from Nets

Feb. 23, 2011


OAKLAND The Golden State Warriors have acquired forward Troy Murphy from the New Jersey Nets, along with the Nets 2012 second round draft pick, in exchange for forward Brandan Wright and center Dan Gadzuric, the team announced today.Murphy, 30, has appeared in 18 games this season for the Nets, averaging 3.6 points and 4.2 rebounds in 16.0 minutes per contest. Originally drafted by Golden State with the 14th selection in the 2001 NBA Draft, Murphy has appeared in 639 regular-season games over 10 seasons with Golden State, Indiana and New Jersey, averaging 11.8 points, 8.5 rebounds and 1.6 assists in 29.0 minutes per contest.Wright, who the Warriors acquired from the Charlotte Bobcats in a draft night trade on July 28, 2007, has appeared in 21 games this season, averaging 4.0 points and 2.0 rebounds per contest. For his career, the 23-year-old has appeared in 98 regular season games over three-plus seasons and currently owns career averages of 5.7 points and 3.0 rebounds per contest.
RELATED: Brandan Wright stats splits game logs
Gadzuric, who was acquired from the Milwaukee Bucks on October 20, 2010, appeared in 28 games for the Warriors this season, averaging 2.8 points and 3.1 rebounds per contest. The 33-year-old center, who has appeared in 511 regular-season games over eight-plus seasons with Milwaukee & Golden State, currently owns career averages of 4.7 points and 4.4 rebounds per game.Courtesy Golden State Warriors media services

Sharks have fond memories of Joe Louis Arena: 'Tough to see it go'


Sharks have fond memories of Joe Louis Arena: 'Tough to see it go'

DETROIT – When listing the greatest Sharks moments at Joe Louis Arena, now in its final season as home of the Red Wings, none will ever top Jamie Baker’s goal in the 1994 playoffs when San Jose shocked the top seed in seven games in the first round. That score essentially put the Sharks on the NHL map, and kick-started their success as a franchise in the Bay Area.

But some current Sharks also have fond memories of the place, headed into their final game here Saturday night, barring a meeting in the Stanley Cup Final. 

Logan Couture scored his first career goal at Joe Louis Arena on Nov. 5, 2009, slipping a feed from Joe Callahan through Chris Osgood’s five-hole. Patrick Marleau was a part of some vicious playoff meetings between the two organizations before Detroit moved to the Eastern Conference, and scored one of the biggest goals of his career at Joe Louis - an overtime playoff goal in Game 3 of the second round in 2010.

“We played a lot of hard hockey games here, but being able to score an OT winner like that it definitely sticks with you for the rest of your career,” Marleau said.

The Sharks downed the Red Wings in the 2010 playoffs in five games, and again in 2011, a seven-game series in which San Jose nearly blew a three-games-to-none lead.

“There were some huge playoff rivalries, obviously series going back-and-forth. A lot of great hockey has been played here,” Marleau said.

Couture grew up in London, Ontario, about an hour-and-a-half drive from Detroit, and lists Steve Yzerman as one of his hockey idols.

“It’s fun coming back here for me and some other guys that are from the area,” he said. “Obviously, a lot of my friends grew up watching the Red Wings. … It’s one of the buildings that I enjoy playing in, so it’s tough to see it go.”

No one in the Sharks organization, though, has more ties to the Detroit area than head coach Pete DeBoer. The 48-year-old moved to nearby Windsor as a teenager and played for the OHL Spitfires for four years in the late 80’s, and was the head coach of the Detroit Whalers from 1995-97 before they relocated to Plymouth, Michigan.

He recalled being around many of the players and coaches that helped the Red Wings win back-to-back Stanley Cups in 1997 and 1998.

“I was coaching with Paul Maurice, and Scotty Bowman was coaching the Red Wings in their heyday. We would get to practice right after they practiced in the morning,” DeBoer said. “Being around that group and those people, Yzerman and all the Russian players they had at the time, and the coaches. It was just a lot of great, great memories. 

“Sad day, it’s a great building. But, time moves on.”

Kershaw stands between Cubs and first World Series since 1945

Kershaw stands between Cubs and first World Series since 1945

Clayton Kershaw stands between the Cubs and the World Series, a possibility that left veteran catcher David Ross thinking about Ric Flair inside Dodger Stadium’s visiting clubhouse late Thursday night: To be The Man, you got to beat The Man. 

“Woo!” That’s how the Cubs like to punctuate their postgame celebration routine, channeling the professional wrestling legend in a ritual with so much sensory overload that the fog machine set off fire alarms throughout the underground Wrigley Field lair…after a win in the middle of August. “Woo!” 
The Cubs left Los Angeles one win away from their first National League pennant since 1945, and with two chances to pull it off this weekend at Wrigley Field, beginning on Saturday night in Game 6. So imagine how this crew would trash the Party Room if they beat Kershaw, a three-time Cy Young Award winner and 2014 NL MVP. 

“The guy competes,” manager Joe Maddon said. “It’s pretty much like mechanics be damned, it’s just about me beating you somehow. 

“He’s got a good fastball that he locates. He doesn’t walk people. He’s got a dynamic curve and slider. And he’s got deception. He’s a little bit funky, and that’s got to be hard to pick up. The ball gets on you pretty quickly, and then he commands it. 

“So there’s nothing you could possibly ask for that he doesn’t already have.”

Now we’ll see if something clicked while the Cubs turned a 2-1 deficit into a 3-2 NLCS lead – handling rookie starters Julio Urias and Kenta Maeda and the softer parts of the Los Angeles bullpen – or if those 18 runs combined in Games 4 and 5 were a mirage.

In 16-plus innings so far, the Cubs still haven’t scored a run off Kershaw, if-necessary Game 7 lefty starter Rich Hill or dominating closer Kenley Jansen, who got this review from Maddon: “He’s like a 100-pound heavier version of Mariano Rivera. He’s the bigger man with the same kind of stuff.”