Athletics

Kaval calls A's ballpark plan 'as big a project' as Oakland has seen

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AP

Kaval calls A's ballpark plan 'as big a project' as Oakland has seen

OAKLAND — A’s president Dave Kaval took part in a fan Q&A session Friday at the Coliseum as part of the team’s Fan Appreciation Weekend.

Here’s some bits and pieces from the session, which was moderated by A’s radio broadcaster Ken Korach:

—Would the A’s re-consider the Coliseum site for a new ballpark if the Peralta location ultimately doesn’t work out?

Kaval: “We’re 100 percent focused on Peralta. We think it can be a dynamic location, and we’re excited about engaging the community. .. But we’re not abandoning East Oakland.”

To that end, Kaval emphasized once again the A’s ambition for the Coliseum site — if all of the current professional teams do in fact bolt the location — to eventually house a youth sports academy with baseball fields and other facilities.

“Wouldn’t it be something to have more home-grown players playing at our (new) ballpark?”

—What other ballparks might be inspirations for design of the venue?

“I think the two guiding principles we have, are, 1) that it’s an intimate ballpark. Not a bad seat in the house. No nosebleeds. Think Fenway or Wrigley (plans are for a roughly 35,000 seat stadium). And 2) build something uniquely Oakland. Something that feels like Oakland, whether it’s an Oaklandish store (built in to the stadium), or the foodie culture …”

—Addressing how city and county funds might be utilized, Kaval emphasized that the ballpark itself will be privately financed, as has been stated before. He mentioned public funds being used for infrastructure (also a long-established idea), including possible enhancements to the Lake Merritt BART station, which is a short walk from the proposed stadium location.

“We’ll work together with the county, with the city, with (the) Peralta (Community College District). This is as big a project as the city has ever seen, a massive coordinating effort.”

—As Kaval told NBC Sports California in this story last week, the A’s plan to retain a good chunk of their current young core of talent to be the cornerstone players once the new stadium opens. Their target move-in date is Opening Day, 2023. That likely means sinking money into long-term extensions for players who will be arriving at, or nearing, their free agency years. Kaval mentioned the Cleveland Indians of the early 90’s as an example of a team opening a new stadium with a home-grown group of stars. Billy Beane, the head of the A’s baseball operations, has made the same comparison in the past.

— The A’s plan to build substantial parking, but the idea is for the new ballpark to be “(public) transit-first, like AT&T Park and Fenway,” Kaval said. … “It’s gonna take cars off the road.”

Having said that, Kaval added that the A’s will aim to preserve the tailgating culture with the parking that they do provide.

Trump to anthem protesters: 'Get that son of a b---- off the field'

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AP

Trump to anthem protesters: 'Get that son of a b---- off the field'

On Thursday prior to the 49ers' game against the Rams, Eric Reid continued his protest during the national anthem by taking a knee.

On Friday, President Donald Trump had an idea as to what should happen to players like Reid. 

Speaking in Huntsville, AL, Trump told a group of his supporters during a campaign rally, "wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when someone disrespects our flag to say, 'get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out. He's fired. He's fired."

The statement was welcomed by cheers from the crowd. 

Reid joined Colin Kaepernick in protest last season. Kaepernick isn't on an NFL roster. Reid sat out Thursday's game with an injury. 

Said Reid of his (non) stance earlier in the year:  “When we started last year, if you recall, we said our goal was to raise awareness and shed light on the issues that were happening in our country. I think we accomplished that goal. What I was upset about was the narrative, the false narrative, that were being told about us, people saying that we’re un-American, that we’re against police entirely and the military. That just wasn’t true. At first I thought that was a small sacrifice to pay to get the word out and raise awareness. I settled with thinking raising that awareness was victory.

“Then fast forward to Charlottesville and the country sees what an un- American protest really looks like. That’s when I had my change of heart. Because what Colin, Eli and I did was a peaceful protest fueled by faith in God to help make our country a better place. I feel I needed to regain control of that narrative and not let people say that what we’re doing is un-American, because it’s not. It’s completely American. We’re doing it because we want equality for everybody. We want our country to be a better place. So that’s why I decided to resume the protest.”

To date, at least 14 players have protested during the national anthem -- that number rises to close to 60 if you include the NFL preseason.

Trump added: “You know, some owner is gonna do that. He’s gonna say, ‘That guy disrespects our flag, he’s fired.’ And that owner, they don’t know it. They don’t know it. They’re friends of mine, many of them. They don’t know it. They’ll be the most popular person, for a week. They’ll be the most popular person in this country.

“But do you know what’s hurting the game more than that [referees]? When people like yourselves turn on the television and you see those players taking the knee when they’re playing our great national anthem. The only thing you could do better is if you see it, even if it’s one player, leave the stadium. I guarantee things will stop. Things will stop. Just pick up and leave. Pick up and leave. Not the same game anymore, anyway.”

With Warriors discussing the matter, Curry reaffirms White House stance

With Warriors discussing the matter, Curry reaffirms White House stance

OAKLAND -- About an hour after general manager Bob Myers said the defending champion Warriors would soon gather to determine their response to any potential invitation from the White House, Stephen Curry reiterated his personal views.

“I don’t want to go,” Curry said during Media Day on Friday.

Curry has previously stated this position, one he shares with several teammates. Kevin Durant and Andre Iguodala also have expressed no interest in visiting President Donald Trump. David West has made clear his distaste for Trump’s boorish conduct.

But Curry has thought not only about the subject but also how he reached his conclusion.

“That we don't stand for basically what our president has -- the things that he said and the things that he hasn't said in the right terms -- that we won't stand for it,” he said. “And by acting and not going, hopefully that will inspire some change when it comes to what we tolerate in this country and what is accepted and what we turn a blind eye to.

“It's not just the act of not going. There are things you have to do on the back end to actually push that message into motion. You can talk about all the different personalities that have said things and done things, from (Colin) Kaepernick to what happened to (Michael) Bennett to all sorts of examples of what has gone on in our country that we need to kind of change. And we all are trying to do what we can, using our platforms, using our opportunities to shed light on that.”

Officially, the Warriors have made no firm decision. They will discuss the matter in the coming day in hopes of reaching a consensus.

Though Curry understands the final decision will be made every consulting with every voice in the locker room -- including coach Steve Kerr, who also has been critical of Trump -- he’s unwavering about his personal stance.

“It's not just me going to the White House. If it were, this would be a pretty short conversation,” he said.

“Like I said, it's the organization; it's the team. And it's hard to say because I don't know exactly what we're going to do in lieu of or if we do go or if we don't go or whatever.

“But my beliefs stay the same. I'll have a better answer for that once I can kind of understand where the group is, too.”

While Iguodala passed on delivering his stance, citing that he had been prepped on the subject by the team’s media relations staff, Durant -- like Curry -- said he has to take the opinions of his teammates into consideration.

“It's going to be tough to change my mind,” Durant said, “but we're going to talk about it as a team and figure out the next steps from there.”

West did not divulge his decision, opting to firmly state he “will let everybody know my opinion” once the team meets on the subject.