Angela Sun will bring fresh perspective to A's home telecasts

Angela Sun will bring fresh perspective to A's home telecasts

MESA, Ariz. — From reporting on-site at the Winter Olympics to investigating ocean contamination in the Pacific, Angela Sun’s career resume is diverse and wide-ranging.

Now she tackles another challenge as CSN California’s new A’s in-game reporter, where she’ll interact with players, coaches and fans to bring viewers a fresh perspective during home telecasts at the Coliseum.

Sun joins the A’s broadcast team during a time of increased optimism surrounding the franchise’s future, with an announcement expected this year about a location for the A’s to build a new ballpark in Oakland.

“I’m excited about Oakland, and the A’s organization specifically, because there’s just so much energy and good vibes right now,” Sun said. “Oakland is such a special place, and I feel like there are so many things that have yet to be discovered. I’m really excited to explore that, to share fans’ stories, to showcase really all that it has to offer.”

A Saratoga native who attended UCLA, Sun has been somewhat of a trailblazer, becoming the first Asian American female sportscaster to appear on ESPN, Yahoo Sports, Tennis Channel, Fox Sports Net and NBC.

She hosted the Yahoo Sports’ NFL-themed show “Outside The Game,” where her stories ranged from Josh Cribbs’ fashion style to Alan Page’s post-football career as a Minnesota Supreme Court justice. In 2010, she reported for Yahoo on site from Vancouver at the Winter Olympics.

As for her own athletic career growing up in the South Bay, Sun broke into a smile describing how her mother played a part in getting that off the ground.

“My mom would not let me do cheerleading,” she said. “Instead, I did volleyball, basketball and softball until I realized I was vertically challenged and I wasn’t going to grow too much anymore.”

She would soon get into activities like snowboarding and skateboarding, which wound up being good preparation for a stint covering the X Games. In high school Sun even taught herself how to surf. Looking back now, she jokes that it wasn’t the safest decision she’s made, but it’s an example of how she dives into things that catch her interest.

“I’m just pretty stubborn that way,” she said. “If I set my mind to something, I will go 110 percent into it. I like to do my research and I like to be thorough about things. But I’m also the first one to say, ‘I don’t know what I’m talking about.’ And if I don’t, I’ll ask.

“So I try to soak things in like a sponge. And that’s what I’m here for, for the fans and for the players and for the staff and coaches … I want to share their stories and I want to be that conduit so that we get to learn a little bit more behind the uniform.”

That desire to explore was instilled in Sun by her father, who passed away when she was just starting college. Her love for surfing planted the seed for the feature documentary she directed and produced in 2013. “Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch” examines the damaging effects of plastic pollution in the oceans. The film has received critical praise and been shown at more than 60 film festivals. Read up on it at plasticparadisemovie.com.

Sun says her inquisitive nature will guide her reporting on the A’s just as it has her other assignments.

“I think if you’re passionately curious about things,” she said, “it’ll just lead you down different roads.”

New-look A's continue the youth movement with Maxwell's arrival

New-look A's continue the youth movement with Maxwell's arrival

OAKLAND — The A’s set off for Chicago on Thursday evening to begin their next road trip, and how their dynamic has changed over the course of one week.

They began their most recent homestand by cutting ties with veteran third baseman Trevor Plouffe to make room for hotshot prospect Matt Chapman. On Thursday, catcher Stephen Vogt suffered the same fate as Plouffe, getting designated for assignment to make room for another young player in Bruce Maxwell.

The calendar may still read June, with more than half of the season remaining, but the A’s are cleaning house, undergoing a reboot and playing the rest of 2017 with an emphasis on what lies ahead.

Five of the nine position players in their starting lineup for Thursday’s 12-9 loss to the Houston Astros are what you would consider “future” guys — center fielder Jaycob Brugman, third baseman Ryon Healy, second baseman Chad Pinder, Maxwell and right fielder Matt Olson.

They will shuffle around the diamond a bit, and Olson may only stay with the big club until Chapman comes off the disabled list (though Olson’s full-time status in the bigs doesn’t seem far off). Regardless, the plan is crystal clear — the A’s are hitching their wagon to their young core and are prepared to let them develop at the major league level, with whatever successes and failures may come with the growth process.

“We do get excited about giving these guys playing time,” A’s general manager David Forst said before Thursday’s game.

The Astros finished off a four-game sweep of Oakland with their 12-9 victory, jumping out to a 10-0 lead and then holding on after the A’s mounted a late charge. Glance up and down the box score, and those key young players were instrumental in so much that went right for the A’s.

Maxwell went 3-for-4 with an RBI. Olson drove in two runs. Pinder had two hits and an RBI. Brugman chipped in an RBI single and walked twice. That was the silver lining on a day that starting pitcher Jesse Hahn struggled mightily, allowing nine earned runs in just two innings.

“These guys are gonna be important,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said. “The last thing you want to see when you’re down 10-0 is guys just cash it in, and that wasn’t the case. These guys all have something to play for. They’re playing for jobs. And in the future, starting jobs.”

Sometime in the not-too-distant future, middle infielder Franklin Barreto will join the mix from Triple-A Nashville. For now, an immediate storyline is the health of Chapman, who joined the 10-day disabled list with a case of cellulitis (bacterial infection) in his left knee. The A’s checked him into a hospital Wednesday night to get an intravenous antibiotic, after his condition “plateaued” with oral antibiotics, according to Forst.

He said Chapman is likely to leave the hospital Friday, and the A’s are hopeful the rookie third baseman will be able to return when he’s eligible to come off the D.L. His stint can be backdated to Monday, meaning Chapman is eligible to return next Thursday at Houston.

He’s part of the youth movement that resulted in Vogt getting shown the exit. Maxwell sent Vogt a text message wishing him the best Thursday morning, and Vogt quickly responded, wishing him the best. That meant a lot to Maxwell, who didn’t learn until Thursday morning that his roster spot was coming at Vogt’s expense.

But Maxwell said he’s excited to be surrounded by so many players that he’s advanced through the minors with.

“Once we get everybody acclimated to each other and the game up here,” he said, “I feel like we could potentially set up a turning point for this organization for years to come.”

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Astros' sweep of once-hot A's

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Astros' sweep of once-hot A's

BOX SCORE

OAKLAND — Under some circumstances, a 4-4 homestand against the Yankees and Astros wouldn’t seem so bad for the A’s.

This wasn’t the way they would have preferred it however.

After sweeping New York in four at the Coliseum, the A’s proceeded to drop four in a row to Houston, including Thursday's 12-9 loss, making this an historic stay at home whether they wanted it that way or not. Only one other time in the past 106 years had the A’s played back-to-back four-game series and swept the first while being swept in the second.

The first time it happened was in September 1977, when they were swept by Texas before taking the broom to Kansas City.

Thursday’s contest got out of hand early, with the Astros jumping out to a 10-0 lead by the second inning before Oakland came roaring back late.

Jesse Hahn (3-5) was out of whack from his first batter and lasted just two innings, getting hammered for a career-high 10 runs (nine earned) and allowing two home runs.

On the same day Oakland designated Stephen Vogt for assignment, another noteworthy former Athletic enjoyed a huge day against his old team as Josh Reddick finished just a single short of the cycle and scored four runs.

But the A’s came alive for a six-run rally in the eighth to close to within 12-9 and make the Astros sweat it.

But Oakland wound up falling a season high-tying 11 games under .500 at 31-42. A six-game road trip is up next to play the White Sox and, once again, the Astros, who ran their winning streak at the Coliseum to 10 and have won 15 of their past 16 against the A’s.

Short day for Hahn: It was clear early that Hahn didn’t have his ‘A’ game. He hit George Springer with a 3-1 pitch to begin the game — Springer exited with a left hand contusion — then walked the next two batters to load the bases with no outs. He limited the damage to two runs in the first, but the Astros poured it on for eight runs in the second, including three-run homers from Jake Marisnick and Marwin Gonzalez.

Maxwell returns with strong game: With Vogt designated for assignment, Bruce Maxwell was promoted to assume catching duties alongside Josh Phegley, and Maxwell enjoyed a 3-for-4 day, including an RBI double as the A’s rallied in the eighth.

The other new arrival also shines: Matt Olson, also called up Thursday as Matt Chapman went on the 10-day disabled list, went 2-for-3 with two RBI.

Reddick has big day: Reddick doubled in the second, homered in the sixth and tripled in the eighth, but didn’t get a chance to complete the cycle against his former club.

Smith steadies things on mound: : Josh Smith took over after Hahn left the game and threw three scoreless innings, striking out four and keeping manager Bob Melvin from having to empty his bullpen.