A's looking to Japan for their next shortstop?

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A's looking to Japan for their next shortstop?

UPDATE at 3:10 p.m. -- Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports is reporting the A's and shortstop Hiroyuki Nakajima are close to an agreement. The A's have scheduled a press conference for 2 p.m. Tuesday. Stay logged on for more soon from Insider Casey Pratt. 

OAKLAND -- Another shortstop option is slipping away. Stephen Drew and the Red Sox have reportedly agreed to sign a one-year deal according to CBS Sports' Jon Heyman.

Drew would have been a good fit in Oakland where the defending American League West Champions currently have a hole at shortstop. The A's met with Drew's agent Scott Boras several times and were interested in a short-term deal, which he eventually signed with Boston. The belief was that Drew could take a deal like this to prove he can have a full and productive season and potentially cash in next offseason.

Drew, 29, only played 79 games in 2012, and missed a total of 137 games with Arizona from July 21, 2011 through June 26 due to a fractured right ankle. After being acquired by the A's on August 20, he seemed to finally get back into the swing of things. He played solid defense and hit .250 with five homers, 16 RBI, and 18 walks in 39 games with the A's.

The deal is reportedly for $9.5 million, or $500,000 less than the A's could have had him for in 2013 with the mutual option on Drew's previous contract. That's a good chunk of change for a career .265 hitter that has only played more than 150 games once in his seven-year MLB career.

Let's explain the mutual option Drew and the A's had. If they decided to stay together in 2013, then Oakland would have paid Drew $10 million. The A's declined the mutual option and Drew became a free agent. Drew and his agent Scott Boras would have been wise to want to test free agency, and the A's were wise not to agree to pay Drew $10 million for a one-year deal. This gave the A's a chance to try and work on signing the shortstop to a multiyear contract at a more reasonable annual rate.

Drew was a good fit in Oakland because he was well-liked by manager Bob Melvin and bench coach Chip Hale. They both coached him when he was with Arizona. The familiarity Drew has with Melvin, Hale, and the A's returning roster seemed like it could have made Oakland an appealing destination, but money talks.

Any solution the A's turn to at shortstop will likely be a short-term option. The A's have 2012 first round pick Addison Russell in the farm system. He could possibly be ready to take over in a couple years.

Oakland has expressed interest in Japanese shortstop Hiroyuki Nakajima. The Seibu Lions' shortstop from the Japanese Pacific League is an intriguing option. He hit .311 with 13 home runs, 74 RBI, 52 walks, and a .382 on-base percentage in 2012 in the Japan Pacific League. It is hard to project how those numbers would translate in Oakland. At the Winter Meetings in Nashville, A's manager Bob Melvin said of Nakajima, "He's a hitter, he looks like a hitter."

Initially it appeared the A's were confident in being able to bring back Drew. They traded Cliff Pennington -- who represented their best in-house plan -- to the Diamondbacks for outfielder Chris Young. Without Pennington, the A's internal options are limited.

On November 16, Oakland acquired infielder Andy Perrino from the Padres. Perrino, 27, played 26 games at shortstop for San Diego in 2012. The switch hitter provides some much needed depth for the A's infield. Adam Rosales played 15 games at shortstop last season, and Eric Sogard played 11 games there.

Grant Green could be an emergency option, but the organization made it pretty clear they don't consider his defense at shortstop adequate. They moved the first round pick to the outfield in 2011, and he played five different positions last season. He would have remained at shortstop if they thought he could succeed there.

Vogt has that 'rejuvenation feeling' going from A's to first-place Brewers

Vogt has that 'rejuvenation feeling' going from A's to first-place Brewers

After five seasons in Oakland, Stephen Vogt begins a new chapter of his career in Milwaukee.

The 32-year-old was designated for assignment by the last-place A's on Thursday and claimed by the first-place Brewers on Sunday.

On Monday, the two-time All-Star catcher discussed his new opportunity with a contender on MLB Network Radio.

"Obviously I was ecstatic to hear I was headed to Milwaukee. We all watch baseball and they are such a fun team to watch right now. And your buddy Eric Sogard is there, so I've got some familiarity. It's an opportunity to win and I think anybody, when you get to the stage I'm in in my career, where I'm 32, I want to win. I'm at the point where that's kind of the goal in the big leagues where all you care about is winning and that's where I'm at. So, to get the news that I'm headed to a first-place team, I couldn't be more excited," Vogt said.

After making the AL All-Star team the last two seasons, Vogt struggled to the tune of a .217 batting average with four home runs and 20 RBI in 54 games.

But with a new team in a new league comes a fresh slate.

"You get that rejuvenation feeling, you get that feeling that this is the change you needed especially going to a winning team where when you're winning, everyone plays better, when you're winning, everyones happier. No matter where you are in life, you want to have that feeling that somebody wants you. So to have Milwaukee come in and say 'We wanted you,' Yeah, it recharged the batteries. I'm ready to go," Vogt said.

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from A's first road sweep of 2017

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from A's first road sweep of 2017

BOX SCORE

The A’s sprung to life offensively in the late innings Sunday and polished off their first road sweep of 2017.

They scored all five of their runs over the final three innings to beat the Chicago White Sox 5-3, continuing an odd stretch of streakiness. The A’s swept the New York Yankees in four at the Coliseum, then turned around and dropped four in a row to the Houston Astros before arriving in Chicago and taking all three from the Sox. It’s their first sweep on the road since they won four in Kansas City from Sept. 12-15 of last season.

The weekend’s events provided a morale boost for a team that began the series an American League-worst 9-25 away from home. The sweep also featured numerous contributions from a pack of recently promoted young players fresh from the minors.

The A’s had no answer for left-hander Derek Holland through six-plus innings, mustering just four hits off the veteran. But trailing 2-0, they got on the board with Jed Lowrie’s pinch-hit RBI double in the seventh. The next inning, Khris Davis singled home the tying run and Yonder Alonso followed with a go-ahead single down the left-field line to put the A’s up 3-2.

They tacked on two insurance runs in the ninth on back-to-back homers from Adam Rosales and Matt Joyce.

Sonny rebounds: Sonny Gray (3-3) avoided the early trouble that plagued his last start, working seven innings and being rewarded with a victory thanks to the A’s eighth-inning rally. He struck out seven and walked just one. That was a key as Gray had issued seven free passes combined in his previous two starts. Adam Engel hit a 2-1 fastball for a homer in the third, then Jose Abreu scored on a passed ball in the fourth to give Chicago a 2-0 lead. But Gray held the Sox to just four hits over his seven innings.

Sign of things to come? Franklin Barreto got a look as the No. 2 hitter in the order Sunday, a spot that some scouts feel he’ll be well suited for as his career unfolds. He singled to the opposite field in his first at-bat, then struck out looking in his next two trips to the plate. In the eighth, his broken-bat single to left jumpstarted Oakland’s two-run go-ahead rally. Barreto is 4-for-10 in his first two games with the big club.

Joyce provides a lift off the bench: Joyce entered as a pinch runner in the seventh and connected for his 10th homer, right after Rosales had gone deep himself. Joyce became the fourth Athletic to crack double figures in homers, and the A’s improved to 31-26 when they hit at least one home run (they’re 3-16 when they don’t).

Doo does it again: Lefty reliever Sean Doolittle continued to deal since coming off the disabled list. He threw a scoreless eighth with two strikeouts and has allowed just one hit over five innings in six appearances since his return.

An unwanted milestone: The Sox scored their second run on a passed ball by Josh Phegley, which accounted for Oakland’s 50th unearned run, most in the majors. They had just 43 unearned runs all of last season.