Manny scratched from spring game with stiff back

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Manny scratched from spring game with stiff back

Designated hitter Manny Ramirez was scratched from the A's spring training contest Wednesday with stiffness in his back, missing a chance to face the Dodgers and former Athletic Aaron Harang.

Chris Carter replaced Ramirez, batting cleanup as the designated hitter.

Ramirez, 39, is hitless in his first five spring plate appearances with his new team. He has hit only one ball out of the infield.

Ramirez still faces the 50-game suspension after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs a second time.

Despite uncertain role in 2017, Healy will be 'happy camper'

Despite uncertain role in 2017, Healy will be 'happy camper'

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — For a player who impressed so much in the second half last season, Ryon Healy’s role remains a bit hazy entering 2017.

The A’s insist he’ll get consistent at-bats — the question is where. As the roster shapes up, Healy will bounce between first base, designated hitter and occasional time at third base when newcomer Trevor Plouffe isn’t in the lineup.

Healy sounds game for whatever might be in store, when asked if he’d rather be guaranteed to play in the field every day.

“I think that’s any player,” Healy said. “But as long as I’m on the big league roster and I’m playing every day in the lineup and contributing to the A’s winning ballgames, I’m going to be a happy camper, that’s for sure.”

Healy earned his first big league promotion as the A’s came out of the All-Star break last summer. He hit .305 in 73 games as Oakland’s everyday third baseman, and he led American League rookies in hits (82) and extra-base hits (33) in the second half.

But when the A’s signed Plouffe in the offseason to man third base, it complicated Healy’s situation because Yonder Alonso remains as the presumed first baseman against right-handed pitchers. Healy, 25, was primarily a first baseman until last season, and he’ll spend this spring getting ready at both corner spots, though A’s Bob Melvin said first base will be more of a priority.

Melvin has talked with Healy already to make sure they’re on the same page about how he’s likely to be used.

“We’ve had conversations with that,” Melvin said. “Shoot, everybody wants to get into a routine and have one spot to play and hit one place in the lineup. That’s just not how we do things here. You try to communicate that to him ahead of time and prepare him for the role he will have. And he’ll prepare very well for it.” Healy, bothered by some quadriceps soreness early in camp, started at first in his exhibition debut Monday and lined a two-run double to left-center off Giants reliever Kraig Sitton.

There are similarities between first and third in that they’re both corner infield spots. But there are also differences that he’s gone over with infield coach Chip Hale.

“They’re both very reactionary positions, but we’ve discussed how to attack ground balls because third base you need to be a little more aggressive because of the throw across the diamond,” Healy said. “First base, you can drop-step a little bit, let the hops get to you. … I just gotta make sure I get quality reps at both and I’ll be OK.”

After all the confusion, Axford pleased 'Moonlight' won Best Picture

After all the confusion, Axford pleased 'Moonlight' won Best Picture

MESA, Ariz. — By the time the Academy Awards wrapped Sunday night, A’s reliever (and movie fanatic) John Axford was content in picking 19 of 24 categories right.

Of course, Axford thought he’d nailed 20 of 24.

He was as shocked as anyone at the mass confusion surrounding the Best Picture announcement that sent the social media world bonkers.

Axford, a film major in college who’s gained attention for his spot-on Oscar predictions, picked “La La Land” to win Best Picture. He was watching the awards show at a restaurant — it had closed down, but employees saw he was so engrossed in the show they let him stay and watch — and when “La La Land” was announced as the winner, he left and didn’t give it another thought.

Not until he got home and saw a text from his agent did Axford know that “Moonlight” wound up winning. That actually sat well with the pitcher. “Moonlight” was his favorite movie of the year, he just didn’t expect the industry to give it the award.

“It was a sad and beautiful film. I absolutely loved it,” Axford said.

He was also happy to see Oakland native Mahershala Ali win Best Supporting Actor for “Moonlight,” after Ali helped arrange a screening of the movie for A’s players.

Axford took to Twitter to share an idea that struck him:

Hey @Athletics...when can we get Mahershala Ali out to the Coliseum to throw out the first pitch? Oscar in one hand, baseball in the other!

Before long, A’s president Dave Kaval had the Twitter response:

“Great idea! We are on it.”