A's spring training Day 32: Bigger crowds could mean no tarps at Coliseum

A's spring training Day 32: Bigger crowds could mean no tarps at Coliseum

MESA, Ariz. — Removing the tarps from the third deck of the Coliseum is an idea the A’s have at least explored, according to team president Dave Kaval.

Don’t expect them to be leaving anytime soon however. Any thoughts of taking the tarps off will be a direct result of increased fan interest and ticket sales, and thus a need for third-deck seating, Kaval said.

“As someone who at one point bought tickets in the third deck and went to games when I was at business school, it’s a very fun environment,” said Kaval, who attended Stanford. “And so we’re evaluating, based on the attendance and the interest in the club, whether or not we’re going to keep them on or remove them. Right now we’re keeping them as is. Kind of the demand dictates that, but that’s not to say that couldn’t change over time.”

The tarps first were introduced in 2006 for A’s games and have been in place ever since. They’ve been the subject of much criticism from the fan base over that time. The A’s removed them from the original third deck for the 2013 American League Division Series against Detroit, though seats on Mount Davis remained covered.

BALLPARK UPDATE: Kaval said the research and behind-the-scenes work continues as the A’s weigh where to build a new ballpark in Oakland. They still are considering four sites — the current Coliseum; Howard Terminal; and two near Lake Merritt — one close to Laney College and another in the Brooklyn Basin area.

Kaval has promised an announcement for a location in the 2017 calendar year, but he wasn’t giving any more specific timetable Friday.

“We’ve been spending a lot of time obviously on the transportation and transit plans for the different locations, as well as really just soliciting community input and seeing what people in the different neighborhoods, what they think about a ballpark in that area,” Kaval said.

PROSPECT WATCH: Franklin Barreto, Matt Olson and Chad Pinder were optioned to Triple-A after Friday’s 3-2 loss to Arizona. The A’s consider all three potential future pieces, with Barreto — a middle infielder ranked as Oakland’s top prospect — in particular turning heads with a dazzling performance this spring. He hit .481 (13-for-27) in 16 games.

Olson hit .167 with two homers and five RBI. He’ll continue to see time at first base and right field. Manager Bob Melvin said Pinder will be groomed as a super-utility guy who will be tried in the outfield as well as playing all over the infield. He hit .158 with two homers and five RBI.

CAMP BATTLE: : Melvin said he envisions the battle for two open rotation spots to possibly last all the way through the Bay Bridge Series. One of the candidates, Raul Alcantara, started against the Diamondbacks and gave up two runs in 3 1/3 innings. He walked two and struck out one.

“He managed it, but I don’t know that that was his best stuff today,” Melvin said.

NOTEWORTHY: Most of the A’s top relievers threw Friday — Ryan Madson, Santiago Casilla, Sean Doolittle and John Axford among them. In his second appearance, Casilla threw a scoreless inning with a strikeout and also started a double play. Melvin liked seeing Doolittle throw his slider multiple times in his scoreless inning, and the manager liked the action on the pitch. Melvin also has been impressed with young catcher Sean Murphy, who was being the plate calling pitches for Doolittle.

“I was impressed that he wasn’t afraid to make him throw his other pitches,” Melvin said of Murphy.

QUOTABLE: A’s executive VP of baseball operations Billy Beane had a little fun with Kaval’s willingness to incorporate the ideas he’s getting from fans during his public office hours.

Beane: “I’m waiting for the fan that comes in and goes, ‘Sign Mike Trout’. And Dave goes, ‘Done!’”

ODDS AND ENDS: Ryon Healy homered for the second day in a row, giving him a team-leading four this spring. His 13 RBI are tied for second in the majors. … Madson struck out three in his inning of work. Axford allowed one run in 1 1/3 innings and has issued five walks in 5 1/3 innings total.

Manaea felt 'little sharp pain', but status of shoulder not immediately known

Manaea felt 'little sharp pain', but status of shoulder not immediately known

ANAHEIM — Sean Manaea is hopeful his left shoulder injury isn’t serious, but the A’s likely won’t have a full read on the starter’s condition for a couple days.

As of Wednesday night, no MRI was scheduled after Manaea left after just two innings of an eventual 8-5 defeat to the Los Angeles Angels with tightness in his shoulder.

“I felt it a little bit in the bullpen,” Manaea said. “I thought it was just one of those days where it took me longer to warm up, and that just wasn’t the case. It’s just really unfortunate.”

Just as the A’s are about to welcome Kendall Graveman back to the active roster Thursday, when he starts the series finale at Angel Stadium, and just as it appears Sonny Gray might be ready to come off the disabled list following one more rehab start, the A’s are hoping they don’t see Manaea subtracted from their rotation for any period of time.

Manager Bob Melvin said it was the top of Manaea’s shoulder that was bothering him.

“The velo was down, and it didn’t make sense to have him keep pitching,” Melvin said. “But we won’t know anything probably for a day or two, how he feels.”

Once he started throwing in the game, Manaea said he felt “kind of a little sharp pain. I mean, it’s nothing serious. I’ve dealt with it before and it only took me a few days to get back on the mound. To me, I’m not really worried about it.”

The pitcher added that he experienced a similar situation with his shoulder while a minor leaguer in Kansas City’s organization, toward the end of spring training, and he missed minimal time.

Things didn’t get better for the A’s (10-11) after Manaea exited, as they struck out 13 times and played sloppy defensively in dropping their third in a row. Catcher Stephen Vogt couldn’t handle Ryan Dull’s glove flip to the plate on a seventh-inning squeeze play, ending a streak of six errorless games for Oakland, but Melvin can live with occasional physical misplays. More problematic were occasions when right fielder Matt Joyce and center fielder Jaff Decker both seemed caught by surprise to see Angels runners take off for an extra base. Whether it was a lack of communication from infielders or the outfielders themselves needing to be more aware, the A’s can’t afford those kinds of mistakes.

“As a group, we can’t let that happen,” Melvin said. “We talk about it in advance meetings the way these guys run the bases. It’s not something we can do and expect to beat this team.”

Added Vogt: “We were on our heels quite a bit. This was obviously not the prettiest baseball game we’ve played.”

Instant Replay: Manaea hurt in A's 8-5 loss to Angels

Instant Replay: Manaea hurt in A's 8-5 loss to Angels

BOX SCORE

ANAHEIM – The A’s endured one of those nights Wednesday when the scoreboard couldn’t convey the extent of their blues.

The tone of an 8-5 defeat to the Los Angeles Angels was set early, when starting pitcher Sean Manaea left after two innings with what was announced as tightness in his throwing shoulder.

From there, things gradually unraveled as the A’s lost their third in a row and took on what looks to be another injury to a key player. The seriousness of Manaea’s injury wasn’t immediately known, but his early exit added to the recent run of medical misfortune, as center fielder Rajai Davis, shortstop Marcus Semien and starter Kendall Graveman have all hit the disabled list over the past 12 days.

Graveman will be activated Thursday and start against the Angels, but Manaea’s condition will loom large as the 25-year-old lefty is considered a foundation piece for the A’s, now and for the future.

The A’s trailed 4-3 in the seventh when the Angels pulled away with four runs off Ryan Dull. Matt Joyce’s two-run homer in the eighth pulled them closer but they lost for the second night in a row at Angel Stadium and will have to win Thursday night to avoid a sweep. Wednesday’s loss dropped them back below .500 at 10-11.

Starting pitching report:
It was obvious early that something was bothering Manaea. His fastball, which usually sits in the low 90’s and gets into the mid-90’s, was hovering in the 88-89 range. The A’s led 2-0 before the Angels struck for three runs in the second. Danny Espinosa and Martin Maldonado each delivered RBI doubles that landed just past the diving reach of right fielder Matt Joyce and center fielder Jaff Decker, respectively. Another run scored on Cameron Maybin’s single.

Bullpen report:
Frankie Montas gave up a run over 2 1/3 innings after being called into early duty when Manaea got hurt. Dull, trying to keep it a 4-3 game, did not have his command in the seventh. He threw a wild pitch, hit Danny Espinosa with a 1-2 pitch and then allowed Maybin’s two-run single that keyed Los Angeles’ four-run seventh.

At the plate:
It was a big night for Yonder Alonso, who had a two-run single in the first and then homered in the sixth to pull Oakland within 4-3. Alonso already has four homers, putting more than halfway to his 2016 total of seven in the season’s first month. The A’s struck out 13 times, giving them 24 strikeouts over the first two games of this series.

In the field:
It took until the seventh inning for the A’s to be charged with an error that snapped their streak of six consecutive errorless games. Stephen Vogt couldn’t hold on to Dull’s glove flip on Martin Maldonado’s squeeze bunt. But even before then, this wasn’t a sharp defensive effort. Joyce got caught off guard in the fourth when Maybin tagged up and made it to second on a fly to right. Joyce’s gesturing afterward seemed to suggest nobody was letting him now the runner was tagging. An inning later, Decker seemed stunned as the lumbering Albert Pujols went first to third on Andrelton Simmons’ single.

Attendance:
The announced crowd was 30,248.

Up next:
Kendall Graveman (2-0, 2.00) is set to come off the D.L. on Thursday and make his first start since April 14, when he was lost to a strained right shoulder. He’ll be opposed by Ricky Nolasco (1-2, 4.76), who took the Opening Night loss against the A’s at the Coliseum when he allowed three runs over 5 2/3 innings. First pitch is 7:05 p.m.