Athletics

A's-Tigers stat pack

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A's-Tigers stat pack

Programming note: A's-Tigers coverage gets underway today at 3:30 p.m. with A's Pregame Live on Comcast SportsNet California!

A's rookies have thrown 641.2 inning this season - the most in baseball by far. With 4 rookies in the rotation the A's could set a record for most innings pitch by rookies on a team that advances to the postseason:

Most Innings Pitched by Rookies
Teams that advanced to Postseason 1952 Brooklyn Dodgers 720.1 2012 Oakland Athletics 641.2 1944 St. Louis Browns 569.2 1984 Kansas City Royals 534.2 1947 New York Yankees 468 1949 Brooklyn Dodgers 457.1
But not only that, the A's have 4 rookie everyday players (Cespedes, Carter, Norris, Donaldson). Only one team in history ever started 4 rookies in a postseason game - the 2007 Arizona Diamondbacks did that 3 times - and who was the manager of the 2007 D-Backs? Bob Melvin.

The A's are starting a totally different infield and catcher compared to what they started for the first 2 months of the season:

A's Regular Lineup

April-May September
C Suzuki, Recker Norris, Kottaras 1B Barton, Ka'aihue Carter, Moss 2B Weeks Pennington, Rosales SS Pennington Drew
3B Inge Donaldson

Most Home Runs by First Basemen American League
Angels 33
White Sox 32
Athletics 30
Blue Jays 30
Orioles 27
Tigers 26
Last Season: A's 1B hit 7 HR - Fewest in Majors

Most Home Runs

First Season with New Team
Josh Willingham MIN 34 Albert Pujols LAA 30 Josh Reddick OAK 29 Carlos Beltran STL 29 Jason Kubel ARI 29 Prince Fielde DET 26 Ryan Ludwick CIN 26
Most Batter Strikeouts
A.L. History
2007 Tampa Bay 1,324
2010 Tampa Bay 1,292
2011 Seattle 1,280
2011 Cleveland 1,269
1996 Detroit 1,268
2009 Texas 1,253
2012 Oakland 1,232

The A's will take their league-leading road winning pct into the 3 cities whose teams have the 3 best home winning pcts:

Best Road Winning Pct in A.L.
Oakland 40-31 .563 Baltimore 40-32 .556 Texas 40-32 .556 New York 40-34 .541 Los Angeles 40-35 .533
Best Home Winning Pct in A.L. Texas 47-27 .635 Detroit 43-28 .606 New York 43-29 .597 Oakland 44-31 .587 Chicago 43-31 .581
A.J. Griffin is 6-0 with a 1.94 ERA in his first 11 big-league starts. Since the major leagues began recording earned runs in 1912, the only other pitcher who was undefeated in his first 11 big-league appearances, all of which were starts, while maintaining an earned run average under 2.00, was Jered Weaver in 2006 (12 GS, 9-0, 1.95).

Lowest WHIP This Season
Min 10 Starts

A.J. Griffin OAK 0.91 Brandon Beachy ATL 0.96 Jered Weaver LAA 1.00 Clayton Kershaw LAD 1.02 R.A. Dickey NYM 1.04 Matt Cain SF 1.05 Justin Verlander DET 1.05
Max Scherzer
Since June 28th
Starts 14
Rec 10-1
ERA 2.53
Opp Avg .221
IP 92.1
K's 113
Leads Majors

Max Scherzer
Last 3 Starts: 1 Walk, 25 Strikeouts

A.L. MVP Candidates

Miguel Cabrera Mike Trout Josh Hamilton Games 145 124 137 Avg .330 .329 .287 HR 38 27 42 RBI 123 77 123 Runs 97 116 98 OPS .993 .957 .947
Detroit Tigers
Since August 8
Record 17-19 1-Runs Games 2-13 AVG .256 RGM 4.0 ERA 3.45 SavesOpps 912
Lost Last 10 Games Decided by 1 Run

Bruce Maxwell: Kneeling for anthem not 'disrespecting my country or my flag'

Bruce Maxwell: Kneeling for anthem not 'disrespecting my country or my flag'

OAKLAND — Bruce Maxwell’s gesture to take a knee during the national anthem Saturday night at the Coliseum was no knee-jerk reaction by the A’s catcher.

It was something he’s considered for a long time, balancing his own personal convictions to make a statement with how it might affect his teammates and organization.

Think it was bold of Maxwell to become the first player in baseball to kneel during the anthem, in protest of racial discrimination and the inflammatory remarks of President Trump? It took just as much guts to stand before his teammates, manager Bob Melvin and GM David Forst and explain why he felt he needed to do it.

He did so in a pregame meeting Saturday that made for a degree of discomfort in the room, but also seemed to have played out in a healthy way.

“I didn’t want them to sugarcoat or aid me when it comes to the media and their personal feelings,” Maxwell said, “because the whole point of this is the ability to protest (based on) our personal beliefs and our personal choices.”

Many athletes have been critical of the President, with things intensifying across the sports landscape Saturday after Trump, among other things, withdrew an invitation for the Warriors to visit the White House and harshly criticized athletes who have knelt during the anthem, saying they should be booted off their teams.

After blasting Trump on both Instagram and Twitter, Maxwell took the field for the anthem and took the action that will define him in the eyes of the baseball world. Maxwell had been wanting to make a statement in some way. He said he and his sister dealt with racial discrimination growing up. Watching Trump’s rally play out in his hometown of Huntsville, Ala. on Friday further persuaded Maxwell to finally do so.

“This goes beyond the black community, it goes beyond the Hispanic community, because right now we’re having … a racial divide in all types of people,” said Maxwell, who is African American. “It’s being practiced from the highest power we have in this country and it’s basically saying it’s OK to treat people differently. And my kneeling, the way I did it, was to symbolize the fact that I’m kneeling for a cause. But I’m in no way or form disrespecting my country or my flag.”

A’s outfielder Mark Canha stood next to Maxwell during the anthem with his hand on Maxwell’s shoulder, a show of support. Canha said he’s considered kneeling before in protest himself but had chosen not to. As he listened to Maxwell address the team, Canha wasn’t going to let his teammate make his statement on his own.

“I could tell he was getting kind of choked up and emotional about his beliefs and how he feels about the racial discrimination that’s going on in this country right now,” Canha said. “I felt like every fiber of my being was telling me that he needed a brother today.”

Canha added that he sensed some “discomfort” in the room as Maxwell addressed the team. But he also said there was support.

“It was an open forum to ask him questions. It was as articulate as I’ve seen him,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said. “This wasn’t an emotional thing just today for him. … I think he handled it really well and everybody was comfortable after the session. I’m proud of him for the fact he went about it the way he did.”

Maxwell, who was born in Germany while his father served in the Army over there, said he will continue to kneel for the anthem. He doesn’t expect his teammates to do the same, only to stick to what they believe in.

“I have plenty of family members, including my father, who have bled for this country,” Maxwell said. “At the end of the day, this the best country on the planet. My hand over my heart symbolized that I am, and will forever be, an American citizen. But my kneeling is what’s getting the attention because I’m kneeling for the people that don't have a voice.”

MLB issues statement on A's Bruce Maxwell kneeling during national anthem

MLB issues statement on A's Bruce Maxwell kneeling during national anthem

A's catcher Bruce Maxwell made history Saturday night in Oakland. The 26-year-old became the first player in big-league history to kneel during the national anthem. 

Below is the official statement from Major League Baseball:

Major League Baseball has a longstanding tradition of honoring our nation prior to the start of our games. We also respect that each of our players is an individual with his own background, perspectives and opinions. We believe that our game will continue to bring our fans, their communities and our players together.

MLB media services contributed to this report