Notes: Sharks' Donskoi nearing a return; Sorensen recalled

Notes: Sharks' Donskoi nearing a return; Sorensen recalled

SAN JOSE – Sharks forward Joonas Donskoi took part in his first full practice in more than a month on Monday, as he battles back from an upper body injury and the flu.

He will not play against the Maple Leafs at SAP Center on Tuesday, but appears to be close.

“He looks good. Getting closer,” Pete DeBoer said. “Obviously, it’s been awhile. It’s his first real practice and contact. So, it’s a good step.”

Donskoi, who is wearing a brace around his right shoulder, said he “feels great,” and joked that it’s been “boring” skating only with injured defenseman Dylan DeMelo, “even though he’s a really good guy.” He was supposed to accompany the team to its game in Vancouver on Saturday, but fell ill.

Donskoi skated on the third line right wing with center Tomas Hertl and left wing Melker Karlsson for Monday's practice. The Sharks’ top two lines remained the same, while the fourth line was Chris Tierney centering Joel Ward and rookie Marcus Sorensen. 

Micheal Haley did not skate for personal reasons, but is expected to be available for the Maple Leafs.

Donskoi has been out since aggravating an injury on Jan. 23 in Colorado, and has missed 16 of the last 19 games overall. In 44 games, he has six goals and nine points for 15 points and an even rating.

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The Sharks recalled Sorensen on Monday morning, while reassigning forward Barclay Goodrow to the Barracuda. Sorensen has one assist in two NHL games this season.

In 43 games with the Barracuda, the 24-year-old winger has 34 points (17g, 17a).

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The Sharks confirmed to CSN that their third round pick in the 2017 NHL Entry Draft belongs to the New Jersey Devils, as compensation for DeBoer. Originally, it was thought that the Devils would not seek compensation for the coach, who was still under contract despite getting fired by New Jersey on Dec. 26, 2014. He was named as Sharks coach five months later.

San Jose still has its first round pick, a fourth, fifth, two sixths and three sevenths in the upcoming draft to be held in late June in Chicago. Its second round pick was dealt to Toronto last season as part of the deal for defenseman Roman Polak.

Sharks feel fortunate with timing of bye week

Sharks feel fortunate with timing of bye week

VANCOUVER – The condensed Sharks schedule has resumed, with a vengeance.

Saturday’s game in Vancouver started a stretch of 22 games over the final 43 days of the regular season for San Jose. The remaining slate features 16 games in the month of March alone, and five back-to-back sets. A game against Calgary at home on April 8 is the finale.

It’s going to be a brutal grind.

Fortunately, the Sharks feel that their bye week came at the right time, as they had five days off with no practice from Monday through Friday, when they boarded an afternoon charter for British Columbia. They had dropped six of eight headed into it, and fatigue was undoubtedly a factor.

Prior to the break, the general feeling was that the Sharks felt privileged with the timing of the bye week. Joe Pavelski was even more emphatic about that notion on Saturday morning, when the complete team reconvened for the first time at Rogers Arena.

“It came at a great time. Everyone’s excited for a break when we get it,” Pavelski said. “Obviously it’s a long season, and you get to go do something you want for a few days, it makes it pretty nice.”
 
Joe Thornton said: “It was just nice to relax and enjoy ourselves.”

The Sharks have essentially had a break in each of the last three months, as the league shut down for Christmas for three days in late December, and the All-Star break came at the end of January. Some teams had their bye weeks as early as the beginning of January, which doesn’t make much sense.

“I thought our breaks were pretty well scheduled – Christmas, All-Star, and then this,” Chris Tierney said. “It was all about a month apart. Hopefully, that pays off.”

It’s been well documented that a number of the Sharks’ veteran players have seen a drop in production, after the club played all the way until June last season in getting to its first-ever Stanley Cup Final. Thornton, Pavelski, Logan Couture, Joel Ward, Marc-Edouard Vlasic and Paul Martin all had some ups-and-downs throughout the first 60 games.

Although the Sharks have maintained first place in the Pacific Division, a commendable achievement to be sure, some guys just looked like they needed some time off.

They got it, and now they can turn their attention as a group to finishing the regular season strong and going into the postseason in prime playing shape. 

Really, that’s all that matters.

“We’ve got a big home stretch coming down the end here, [22] games to finish off strong to put ourselves in a good position going into the postseason,” Ward said. “We’re excited about the capabilities of what we have going.”

Thornton said: “We’ve got a lot of games here in a short period of time, so hopefully we all got our rest and get ready for the stretch run.”

Three takeaways: Sharks stand up for Karlsson; avoiding the mumps

Three takeaways: Sharks stand up for Karlsson; avoiding the mumps

VANCOUVER – It was a successful first game coming out of the bye week for the Sharks, as they won going away against the Canucks at Rogers Arena on Saturday, 4-1. Here are our three takeaways from the evening in British Columbia…

1 – Slow start, strong finish

The league-wide trend of starting slow coming out of the NHL’s newly instituted bye week was on display in the first period, as the Sharks and Canucks played one of the uglier frames of NHL hockey you’ll ever see. San Jose was on its heels early, surrendering the first six shots of the game and looking particularly confused. They didn’t register a single hit in the period, either, which is hard to do.

The Sharks were lucky that Vancouver wasn’t much better, and that Martin Jones – whose performance we focused on in primary the game recap – was looking sharp and well rested.

The message after the scoreless first period, according to coach Pete DeBoer, was just to “try and get better.” That’s what happened.

“We knew it would be a little messy, and it was,” DeBoer said. “Jonesy thankfully was our best player, and gave us a chance to get our legs under us. I thought as the game wore on we got better and better. It wasn’t a pretty win, by any means.”

Chris Tierney said: “After the first 10 minutes [we] started to feel good and then kind of felt back to normal in the second there. It definitely took a little bit. Joner bailed us out in the beginning a couple times. I thought we started to get going in the second and third.”

2 – Standing up for Karlsson

Melker Karlsson was lucky to return in the third period after he took a heavy hit from Joseph Labate. Karlsson had to be helped to the dressing room after the blow, when his head violently snapped back as Labate ran him into the boards in front of the bench.

Micheal Haley pounced on Labate immediately after the incident, earning a two-minute minor that the team was probably happy to kill off. Labate, to his credit, answered the bell in the third period when he was challenged by and fought Brenden Dillon. The Sharks will face the Canucks three more times this season, including on Thursday, so a response to the hit was particularly necessary even if it was clean.

“That sends a good message to the team that everybody has each other’s back,” Mikkel Boedker said of Haley and Dillon’s efforts. “Those guys are real standup guys, and they’ve done it so many times. Every time they do it, it means something special to all of us.”

DeBoer said: “That’s a huge part of our team and our team identity. We’ve got a group that you’re not going to be able to push to of games, and I think we’ve shown that over the last two years here. You don’t even have to say anything, that’s just automatic.”

3 – Avoiding the mumps

Some eyebrows were raised in the press box midway through the game when the Canucks tweeted that defenseman Luca Sbisa would not return with the stomach flu. That’s one of the early warning signs of the mumps, meaning Sbisa could have exposed some Sharks to the virus, which is making its way through the Vancouver dressing room.

“What are you going to do? We’ve just got to cross our fingers and get outta here and hope that he didn’t rub up against anybody,” DeBoer said.

The Sharks coach said after the game that he thought “most of our guys” have had vaccinations, but “I believe there’s a couple that haven’t.”

After the virus invaded several NHL dressing rooms two seasons ago, the Sharks’ training staff will likely be on the lookout for symptoms when the team reconvenes on Monday. Hopefully, the outbreak will begin and end in Vancouver this time.

“Definitely, you want to make sure that you stay away from all that stuff,” Boedker said.