Beach volleyball players allowed to cover up now

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Beach volleyball players allowed to cover up now

From Comcast SportsNet
GENEVA (AP) -- Most female beach volleyball players will wear their usual bikini outfits at the London Olympics. For those who prefer to cover up, that's OK, too. Under new rules adopted by the International Volleyball Federation (FIVB), players are free to wear shorts and sleeved tops. The governing body said the move was made out of respect for the cultural beliefs of some of the dozens of countries still in contention to qualify for the games. "Many of these countries have religious and cultural requirements so the uniform needed to be more flexible," FIVB spokesman Richard Baker told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The rule, which will now apply to the Olympics, has already been in effect at five Continental Cup qualifying competitions involving 142 nations. "Winners of the Continental Cups will qualify for the Olympics, so it has to be applied," Baker said. The FIVB has not specified which countries have lobbied to be allowed to cover up in London. An African qualifying event scheduled May 24-26 in Kigali, Rwanda, includes Algeria, Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo among the contenders. Photographs on the FIVB's website of preliminary matches shows female players from those countries covering their midriffs by wearing sleeveless tops, which are the typical attire of indoor volleyball teams. A Continental Cup qualifier to be played in Asia will include India, Indonesia and Sri Lanka among 12 competing nations. The modified rule permits "shorts of a maximum length of three centimeters (1.18 inches) above the knee, and sleeved or sleeveless tops." Bikinis have helped define women's beach volleyball, which became an Olympic medal event at the 1996 Atlanta Games. FIVB regulates the size of bikinis allowed, setting "a maximum side width of seven centimeters (2.76 inches)." But players also had the option to wear body suits in cold weather. "Up until now, athletes had the choice," Baker said. "They weren't forced to wear a bikini." Cultural and religious sensitivities have been brought into focus by changes to the Olympic entry format to encourage more nations to compete. Four years ago, qualification was based almost entirely on world rankings earned by competing in at least eight elite-level events. The Continental Cup competitions, which began in July 2010, now offer direct routes to the Olympics. The women's tournament at London will be played from July 28-Aug. 12 and is expected to sell out almost every session. "We're at a high level (of interest) like the final of gymnastics. They will pay special attention to beach volleyball," FIVB President Wei Jizhong told the AP last year. Wei's ruling board gave added support to beach volleyball last week, deciding it will replace indoor volleyball as the FIVB's nominated sport at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China. Beach volleyball also is a commercial success, with the women's season-long World Tour this year comprising 13 events in Europe, Asia, Brazil and Canada. Shorts and sleeved tops are also now allowed in that event, which is dominated by players from Brazil, the United States and Europe who have favored wearing bikinis. "We don't think we will see much change (in uniforms) on the World Tour," Baker said.

Instant Replay: Sharks rally late, stun Rangers in OT to end skid

Instant Replay: Sharks rally late, stun Rangers in OT to end skid

BOX SCORE

SAN JOSE – Despite blowing a two-goal lead, the Sharks found a way to tie their game with the Rangers late and win it in overtime, 5-4, to end their losing streak at six games.

After New York had turned a 3-1 deficit into a 4-3 lead, Chris Tierney knotted the score with just 2:15 left in regulation. Mikkel Boedker’s shot from high in the zone rattled around the slot, and Tierney was there to flip it home for this second of the night.

Brent Burns ended a 16-game goal drought with a power play goal at 3:10 in overtime, overpowering Henrik Lundqvist with a slap shot.

After Tierney had given San Jose a 3-1 lead earlier in the second period the Sharks kept up the pressure, recording seven of the next eight shots. But Patrick Marleau’s interference penalty on Jimmy Vesey gave New York a late power play and turned the game in their favor.

Derek Stepan – who was stopped on a partial breakaway midway through the first period – brought the Rangers back to within 3-2. Mats Zuccarello hummed a seam pass through Justin Braun to Stepan, who had an open net to deposit his 16th of the season in the final minutes of the second period.

In the third, Jesper Fast redirected a Brady Skjei floater at 1:24, tying the game at 3-3. A Burns tripping minor during four-on-four play offered a power play to the Rangers, and they capitalized on a J.T. Miller one-timer at 4:44, his second of the night.

The Sharks remain two points back of Anaheim for first place in the Pacific Division, and are tied with Edmonton for second.

For the first time in eight games the Sharks struck first. A newly configured third line of Tomas Hertl, Boedker and Jannik Hansen scored on its first shift together, as Hansen chopped in a loose puck at 1:44. Boedker and Hertl both got assists, ending pointless streaks of 10 games and 12 games, respectively.

Hansen’s first goal as a Shark also gave the team its first lead in more than two weeks, as it never led throughout its six-game regulation losing streak.

The Rangers tied it at 13:30 of the first on a goal by Miller, who took the puck from Paul Martin along the wall and lifted a perfectly placed wrist shot over Martin Jones’ near shoulder.

Melker Karlsson, returning from an eight-game absence, put the Sharks ahead 2-1 late in the first period with a shorthanded score. He whizzed a wrist shot past countryman Lundqvist at 18:01 while on a two-on-one with Tierney.

Tierney increased the lead to 3-1 in the middle frame, taking a shot from the slot and following up his own rebound at 11:38. It was just his second goal in the last 22 games, and eighth of the year.

The Rangers won the only other game of the season series back on Oct. 17 at Madison Square Garden, 7-4. The Sharks finished the season with a 21-7-4 mark against Eastern Conference clubs.

The Sharks were without Logan Couture, who is out indefinitely with a facial injury.

Special teams:
Two of New York’s goals came on the power play, on three opportunities. The Sharks are 11-for-15 on the PK in the last six games.

San Jose had just one power play before overtime, failing to score. Karlsson’s marker was his second shorthanded score of the season, and the Sharks’ seventh as a team.

In goal:
After allowing a career high seven goals-against on Saturday in Nashville, Jones made 24 saves on 28 shots.

Lundqvist suffered the loss with 30 saves on 35 shots.

Lineup:
Micheal Haley served a one-game suspension for punching Nashville’s Calle Jarnkrok on Saturday.

Tierney (upper body) and Marc-Edouard Vlasic (flu) both returned after missing Saturday’s game with the Predators. Marcus Sorensen came out of the lineup for Kevin Labanc, who was recalled on Tuesday morning and skated on the top line.

New York’s Skjei had three assists.

Up next:
The Sharks have six games remaining in the regular season – two each against Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver.

A three-game road trip against each of those division rivals begins on Thursday with the Oilers, as the clubs battle for home ice advantage in the first round of the playoffs, and continues on Friday against the Flames and Sunday versus the Canucks.

 

Draymond expresses distaste for Raiders' move: 'I won't attend a game'

Draymond expresses distaste for Raiders' move: 'I won't attend a game'

Having been a member of the Warriors for nearly five years, Draymond Green has become a fan of Oakland and its people.

Considering that, as well as Green’s outspoken nature, perhaps it’s not surprising he expressed profound distaste for the Raiders’ impending move to Las Vegas.

“That's crazy. I feel bad for the city of Oakland,” Green told reporters Tuesday night, after the Warriors posted a 113-106 win over the Rockets in Houston. “I don't even know how that's going to work, honestly, with a football team moving to Las Vegas. I feel bad for the city.

“If I were the fans, I wouldn't attend a game for the next two years. But that’s just me. That's ridiculous. No way I'd pay my money to attend a game.”

Though Green roots for the Pittsburgh Steelers, the 27-year-old power forward has attended games at the Coliseum and developed relationships with members of the Raiders, a franchise established in Oakland in 1960. The team moved to Los Angeles in 1982, and returned to Oakland in 1995.

Green was 5 years old in Saginaw, Mich. when the Raiders returned to their original home in ‘95, and he, like many Bay Area Raiders fans, clearly is having trouble digesting the idea of them being based in another city.

“That's like moving the Dallas Cowboys or moving the Packers,” he said. “Moving the Raiders? You can move a lot of teams. Ain't many fan bases like the Raiders fan base. That's like moving the Boston Celtics from Boston or the Lakers from LA.

“You just don't move certain franchises with the fan base they have.”

The Raiders are the second professional team preparing to vacate Oakland. The Warriors, after all, are planning to move to San Francisco in 2019.

“It's one thing if you're moving them from Oakland to Fremont or something,” Green said of the Raiders. “To Las Vegas? I wouldn't attend a game. I won't attend a game.

“And I'm not a diehard Raiders fan, but I support the city of Oakland. It ain't for me and I feel like all fans should feel that way. You just don't do that. Come on man, that's ridiculous.”