49ers notes: Miami native Gore reveals his true colors


49ers notes: Miami native Gore reveals his true colors

SANTA CLARA – He may be a native of Miami, and even played his college ball for the Hurricanes, but San Francisco running back Frank Gore actually grew up rooting for the team with which he currently plays right now.

Why was he a 49ers fan as a kid?

“They was winning. They were a good team,” the 29-year-old Gore said on Tuesday, from the team’s practice facility.

He’ll get a chance to go up against the Dolphins on Sunday when the Niners try to rebound from Sunday’s disappointing 16-13 overtime defeat in St. Louis. Gore, too, will look to put that game in the rear view mirror on a personal level, after gaining just 58 yards on a season-high 23 carries for just 2.5 yards-per-carry.

“They had eight or nine men in the box. They played good defense. They’ve got a great D-line, their linebackers played good,” Gore said of the Rams. “They did a great job.”

The game will mark the first meeting between San Francisco and Miami since Dec. 14, 2008, and first at Candlestick Park since Nov. 28, 2004.

Gore would actually prefer the game was being played in South Florida, after he missed what would have been a homecoming four years ago with an ankle injury.

“I wish we could have played them down there, that would have been special, in front of all my fans in Miami and [where] a lot of my family is from,” he said. “All my Hurricane fans, they probably miss me.”

* * *

Gore was asked about rookie running back LaMichael James, who could see his first action in a 49ers uniform on Sunday after he was drafted in the second round by the team this past April.

Gore, who is happy to act as a mentor to the young and speedy James, has seen improvement in the 23-year-old since he first laid eyes on in the summer.

“He got better in small spaces,” Gore said. “You watch his film in college, it’s a lot of big spaces. In the NFL it’s different. Early on, he had a tough time with that, but now from when I first saw him, he got a lot better at that.”

Gore stressed to James that patience is a virtue when running the football in the NFL.

“When you’re getting the ball it ain’t about how fast you go, it’s penetration, how fast you can get through. When he used to get the ball he used to just use his speed. I told him you’ve got to let things develop, be patient. When you see it, that’s when you be fast through the hole,” Gore said.

The 49ers are searching for someone to fill the role left by the injured Kendall Hunter, who acted as a change of pace to Gore’s bruising style. In Sunday’s game in St. Louis, Brandon Jacobs, who employs a similar style to Gore, was the only other back to get the ball. Jacobs rushed four times for just six yards.

Quarterback Colin Kaepernick was the team’s leading rusher with 84 yards on nine carries, including a 50-yarder in which Gore delivered a key block.

“Whatever it takes to have successful play to win and I’m a part of it, I’m with it,” Gore said of his block.

* * *

The 49ers know as well as anyone that regular season records get thrown out the window once the playoffs begin. After finishing the regular season 13-3 a year ago, they fell to the New York Giants in the NFC Championship Game. The Giants, after a 9-7 regular season, went on to defeat the Patriots in the Super Bowl.

Cornerback Carlos Rogers stressed that the team needs to finish the regular season strong. After Miami, the 49ers close out with games against New England, Seattle and Arizona.

“It’s really important to finish the quarter strong. We talk about four quarters. This is the last quarter,” Rogers said.

“The teams that do good in the playoffs, at the end of November and December they’re kind of clicking and kind of get going. That’s what’s we’ve got to do. We can’t come into the playoffs with losses like last weekend, not hitting on all cylinders. You see the example with New York, everybody counted them out, and they ended up hitting it at this point last year, and ended up winning the Super Bowl. We’ve got to follow that same path.”

Miami is just 5-7 this season, but has already secured wins against St. Louis and Seattle – one club which has beaten the Niners (St. Louis), and another that gave them a tough battle earlier this season in Seattle, which lost 13-6 to the 49ers on Oct. 18.

“I know they’re a pretty good team,” Rogers said of the Dolphins. “They’ve had their ups and downs but the team is growing: new coaches, new players, and a team that’s coming together. There’s no team that we’re going to take lightly, regardless of what their record is, and we’ll just try to get the W.”


Rewind: Shorthanded Penguins stun Sharks in late comeback

Rewind: Shorthanded Penguins stun Sharks in late comeback

PITTSBURGH – The primary reason the Sharks made the additions and subtractions they did in the offseason was to match up better against a swift-skating team like Pittsburgh, which won last June’s Stanley Cup Final by playing a game based on speed.

If the first rematch is any indication, even a dramatically shorthanded Penguins team can still get the job done against San Jose.

Despite no Sidney Crosby, no Kris Letang, no Matt Murray, no Conor Sheary, and no third defense pair of Olli Maatta and Derrick Poulliot for the third period, the Penguins stormed from behind to give the Sharks a 3-2 loss on Thursday night at PPG Paints Arena. All of the Penguins’ goals came in the third period after they trailed 2-0 to start the final frame.

For the second time in four games on their road trip, the Sharks controlled play through two periods. That was enough against lowly Columbus last Saturday, but not against the Penguins, who got goals from Evgeni Malkin, Scott Wilson and Patric Hornqvist in span of eight minutes and 15 seconds in the third.

“Let them hang around a little bit, which is something we’ve done lately,” Pete DeBoer said. “Had some opportunities to extend it, and didn’t. Probably deserved to be up by more, but we weren’t. That’s what happens.”

San Jose got goals from Tomas Hertl and Patrick Marleau in the second period, a period that saw them outshoot the Penguins, 17-4. Shots were 27-10 overall through 40 minutes.

They started well in the third, too, when Mikkel Boedker drew a trip on Malkin at 4:10. Just after the ensuing power play had expired, Boedker was staring at a wide open net after slick seam pass from Joonas Donskoi, but fired wide.

Malkin scored 30 seconds later, and the comeback was on.

“Just missed it. It’s a tough shot when it comes from the other way, but [Donskoi] made a good pass,” Boedker said. “It’s one of those you want to put in, and when things are going the right way, they come in bunches. … Obviously it sucks, but that’s the way it goes sometimes.”

After Malkin’s goal, and another by Wilson tied it, the Sharks took a pair of minor penalties. Paul Martin was called for a delay of game that was killed off, but Marc-Edouard Vlasic’s slash on Bryan Rust resulted in Hornqvist’s winner with less than six minutes to go in regulation.

Joe Pavelski didn’t seem to like either call, indicating that Martin’s errant clearing attempt hit a Penguins stick on its way out, and the Vlasic slash late a tie game is a call “that you don’t always see.”

Hornqvist got a couple fortunate bounces on his goal, too. He took control of the puck in front of the net after it hit Joel Ward’s foot, and his shot attempt deflected in off of Martin’s skate.

“They got a bounce or two more, but the position we were in, it shouldn’t matter how many bounces they get,” Pavelski said. “We’ve got to seal that game.”

The captain expressed disappointment over the fact that the Sharks squandered a chance to move to 4-1-0 on the season, which would be an accomplishment considering their early peripatetic schedule in which they played just one home game before traveling east.

That outweighed any sort of revenge factor that might have been on the minds of the players that were defeated by Pittsburgh in the Final last spring.

“The biggest thing is we were playing for a 4-1 record going into that third [period]. Not because it was the Penguins,” Pavelski said. “It’s early in the year and it’s not easy to start coming on the road with all these games. Now we’re staring at 3-2, and we move on. It would have been nice to beat them, for sure, but the best thing would have been for that record.”

The Sharks can still conclude their five-game trip with a winning mark by beating Detroit on Saturday.

DeBoer said: “We’re not going to overreact. We played very good hockey for large amounts of this game. Learn from it, and move forward.”

Instant Replay: Sharks blow lead in Cup rematch with Penguins

Instant Replay: Sharks blow lead in Cup rematch with Penguins


PITTSBURGH – It wasn’t the Stanley Cup Final, but it was a disappointing defeat for the Sharks against the Penguins nonetheless, as Pittsburgh stormed back from a two-goal deficit in the third period to stun San Jose, 3-2.

The game-winner came from Patric Hornqvist. On a Pittsburgh power play, he found a loose puck and swiped it in off of Paul Martin's skate with 5:58 left in regulation.

The Penguins trailed 2-0 to start the third, but Evgeni Malkin got them on the board. After the Sharks were caught scrambling in front of their own net, Malkin took control of the disc in the high slot. He spun around and flicked it through Martin Jones at 6:47.

A little more than two minutes later, Hornqvist drilled Brenden Dillon on the corner, jarring the puck loose from the wall. Scott Wilson grabbed it, swooped towards the crease and slipped it though at 9:01 to knot the game at 2-2.

The Sharks (3-2-0) fell to 2-2 on their five-game road trip, which concludes with their final visit to Joe Louis Arena in Detroit on Saturday.

San Jose scored twice in a dominant second period in which it outshot Pittsburgh, 17-4.

Tomas Hertl’s second goal in as many games opened the scoring. He got to the front of the net and poked in a Joe Pavelski rebound at 5:04 after goalie Marc-Andre Fleury lost control of his stick while making a save on Brent Burns moments earlier.

Patrick Marleau created the second goal at 16:15, stripping Chris Kunitz of the puck at the blue line and finishing off a give-and-go with Logan Couture for his second of the year.

Prior to Marleau’s marker, the Penguins had a power play goal waved off. On a power play, Phil Kessel directed a rebound towards the net, and it rattled around off of the post and Jones’ left pad. Hornqvist directed it in, but a video review showed it illegally went in off of his glove and not his stick with 6:41 left in the period.

San Jose was 28-0-2 last season when leading after two periods, and 9-0 in the playoffs.

Special teams

The Sharks allowed one power play goal in five Penguins advantages, and were 0-for-3 on the power play.

Mikkel Boedker had a chance to essentially seal the win on a third period advantage for the Sharks, but couldn’t bury a Joonas Donskoi pass into an empty net. Malkin brought the Penguins back to within a goal moments later.

San Jose killed off a Martin delay of game penalty at 10:17 of the third to keep it 2-2, but Marc-Edouard Vlasic's slash led to Hornqvists's goal.

In goal

Jones fell to 2-2 on the season with three goals allowed on 20 shots.

Marc-Andre Fleury got the win with 32 saves. Starter Matt Murray remains out with a hand injury.


Pittsburgh was down to four defensemen by the end of the game, as Olli Maatta and Derrick Pouliot were forced from action in the second period.

The Penguins were without several key pieces to start the game, including Murray, best defenseman Kris Letang, and the best player in the world, Sidney Crosby.

Matt Nieto returned to the lineup in place of Micheal Haley on the fourth line. Nieto was a healthy scratch on Tuesday against the Islanders.

Up next

After Saturday’s game in Detroit, the Sharks finally play their second game at SAP Center on Tuesday, Oct. 25 against Anaheim in the first of a three-game homestand. Columbus and Nashville also visit.