Steinmetz: The Keith Smart Era Begins

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Steinmetz: The Keith Smart Era Begins

Sept. 28, 2010STEINMETZ ARCHIVEWARRIORS PAGE WARRIORS VIDEOMatt SteinmetzCSNBayArea.com

The Warriors had their first practice under head coach Keith Smart on Tuesday, and nothing seemed to go out of the ordinary.Smart put his team through a two-hour morning workout, one thatincluded plenty of conditioning-type drills, according to Smart and theplayers. Most of the practice was closed to the media.The Warriors are looking at a week's worth of two-a-days, so Tuesday's evening session will include more actual basketball.If teams hold two practices in one day, one of those practices must benon-contact, according to the collective bargaining agreement.--A large contingent of media was in town just for Jeremy Lin, whom theWarriors signed this summer after he went undrafted out of Harvard.Lin, who is Taiwanese, enjoys wide support among the Asian community.When Smart was asked about the interest in Lin, Smart indicated whathe'd like is to see as much interest in the team, itself, the Warriors.--Rookie Ekpe Udoh, who recently had the cast removed from his leftwrist, was out on the court, although on an adjacent court. Udoh seemedto be trying to simulate what his teammates were doing in terms offull-court one-on-one drills, etc.--Stephen Curry was asked what he thought the biggest thing was that he learned playing in the FIBA World Championships. Curry's answer: "on-the-ball defense."

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Steve Kerr expands on marijuana, problems with painkillers in sports

Steve Kerr expands on marijuana, problems with painkillers in sports

OAKLAND – Having stirred widespread discussion after his comments Friday regarding his use of marijuana to treat chronic pain, Warriors coach Steve Kerr took a few minutes Saturday to expand on the subject.

“It was interesting, because the way the world works and the way the media works now, what is a very serious discussion about pain relief turns into the headline: ‘Kerr smokes pot,’ “ Kerr said during his news conference before the Suns-Warriors game at Oracle Arena. “I guess that’s the world we live in. That’s fine.

“But I’m actually kind of glad that it became an issue because I think it’s a very important issue to talk about.”

The overriding issue, Kerr said, is that dangerous prescription painkillers are more widely accepted than marijuana, despite research to the contrary.

“I do find it ironic that had I said that I’ve used OxyContin for relief from my back pain, it would not have been a headline,” he said. “So that’s all. I just urge people to do your research before you start taking the stuff that we’re all encouraged to take.”

Kerr’s initial comments were made Friday in response to a question on The Warriors Insider Podcast. Asked if he could visualize a time when marijuana would be accepted, much as alcohol or prescription drugs, he said he hoped so and added that he had experimented with it in hopes of alleviating his pain.

“I’m disappointed it didn’t work,” he said Saturday. “I really wanted some relief and I didn’t get it.”

With 26 states having voted in laws allowing use of marijuana, the stigma continues to shrink. That’s not true, not yet, of sports leagues, which will follow the research and better understand and apply and findings.

“Having gone through a tough spell over the last year with my own recovery from back surgery, a lot of pain, a lot of chronic pain, I had to do a lot of research,” he said. “You get handed prescriptions for Vicodin, OxyContin, Percocet . . . NFL players, that’s what they’re given. That stuff is awful. That stuff is dangerous, the addiction possibility, what it can lead to, the long-term health risks. The issue that’s really important is how do we do what’s best for the players.

“But I understand that it’s a perception issue around the country,” he added. “The NFL, the NBA, it’s a business. So you don’t want your customers thinking, ‘These guys are a bunch of potheads.’ That’s what it is.

“But to me, it’s only a matter of time before medicinal marijuana is allowed in sports leagues because the education will overwhelm the perception. If you do any research at all, the stuff they’re prescribing is really bad for you and the stuff that they’re banning is fine."

Kerr stressed that he was not advocating for recreational use of marijuana but urging consideration for medicinal use where it applies.

Draymond Green to wear custom 'Sideline Racism' Nike shoes

Draymond Green to wear custom 'Sideline Racism' Nike shoes

For all Week 13 NFL games, players have the clearance to wear custom-designed cleats to highlight a cause that they are passionate about. And Draymond Green is joining the movement with his Nike shoes this weekend. 

Green will wear specially designed yellow and blue Nikes that read, "Sideline Racism." On Twitter, Green wrote "I stand with my @NFL brother this weekend in wearing @RISEtoWIN's Sideline Racism shoes in uniting against racism. We stand united @NFL."

The shoes are through RISEtoWIN, whose Twitter profile states the organization as "dedicated to harnessing the unifying power of sports to improve race relations."

RISE (the Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality) is a non-profit organization, which was founded by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross in 2015.