What Warriors want from Barnes

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What Warriors want from Barnes

LAS VEGAS -- The Warriors had just completed their evening practice onWednesday night, and reporters started to make their way toward assistant coachPete Myers.But before any questions could be asked of Myers, he had onefor the writers: Howd he look tonight?Pretty good, came a response.The player in question was Warriors rookie Harrison Barnes,who had just gotten done with his most impressive showing as a pro. Sure, itwas only a practice that involved short segments of scrimmaging, but it was thefirst real glimpse of what Barnes may be capable of.Barnes knocked down perimeter shots, got to the rim onoccasion and rebounded well from the small forward spot.Hes good, hes good, said Myers, who is serving as theWarriors summer league head coach. He kind of picks his spots. But I think wecan get him to step up offensively. Hes got ability, no question aboutthat.Truth be told, the Warriors havent been concerned aboutBarnes offensive game. That will take care of itself, the Warriors seem tobelieve.Its on the defensive end where the Warriors want Barnes tofocus, at least for now.Were trying to get him on the right track defensively,Myers said. He can do some things there. I dont know if you saw him take thatcharge (on the perimeter, defending Draymond Green). To me, thats huge getting a young kid taking that step, cutting off a players dribble and taking (the charge). Thats big.Barnes acknowledged that the adjustment on the defensive endfrom college to the pros is significant. Barnes said that with all the newconcepts, schemes and terminology hes learning, hes probably doing morethinking than playing at this point.You have to have a high basketball IQ to play at thislevel, Barnes said. So much goes into each possession defensively,offensively, spacing, timing. You have to be locked in and have good mentaltoughness.Myers said the adjustments Barnes has to make are the normfor first-year players, but hes been encouraged by how quickly Barnes picksthings up.A lot of nights (at North Carolina) he was probably thebest athlete on the floor, Myers said. And he played with a lot of athletesso he could get away with some stuff. Now hes matched up with guys who areequally athletic.Said Barnes: There are a lot of things that are different.For example, the corner 3-point shot. I didnt think about that in college. Wejust treated it like a normal play or shot. But in the NBA thats a veryhigh-percentage shot. There are different coverages on pick and rolls,different post defenses. Its been an adjustment, definitely, at the defensiveend.

Draymond Green to wear custom 'Sideline Racism' Nike shoes

Draymond Green to wear custom 'Sideline Racism' Nike shoes

For all Week 13 NFL games, players have the clearance to wear custom-designed cleats to highlight a cause that they are passionate about. And Draymond Green is joining the movement with his Nike shoes this weekend. 

Green will wear specially designed yellow and blue Nikes that read, "Sideline Racism." On Twitter, Green wrote "I stand with my @NFL brother this weekend in wearing @RISEtoWIN's Sideline Racism shoes in uniting against racism. We stand united @NFL."

The shoes are through RISEtoWIN, whose Twitter profile states the organization as "dedicated to harnessing the unifying power of sports to improve race relations."

RISE (the Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality) is a non-profit organization, which was founded by Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross in 2015. 

Bogut voices opinion on use of marijuana in NBA

Bogut voices opinion on use of marijuana in NBA

A day after Steve Kerr told Monte Poole on The Warriors Insider Podcast that he used marijuana twice over the last year and a half, players around the league are offering their take on the use of pot in the NBA.

The latest is former Warriors center Andrew Bogut.

According to ESPN's Tim MacMahon, Bogut had this to say on Saturday evening prior to the Mavericks game against the Bulls.

"I've never tried it. I don't know how much it helps, but from what I heard from guys who are retired and have chronic injuries, they say it helps a lot. Like I said, you are bringing a big can of worms if you allow it [without restrictions]. If you have open season, you're going to have guys, I guarantee you're going to have people playing in a game or practicing high. It's just the reality of it. You have guys in pro sports playing hungover. You have guys come to practice drunk sometimes. That's how it is. If you all of the sudden can smoke, although there are a lot of positives to it, the downside is you could possibly have a lot of guys that are not 100 percent in the present. I think that's why the league is saying what it's saying. But as far as it being legal in society, it should be fine to be legal. It's a plant, it's an herb, it's a weed. … People that I've known that smoke, friends of mine, they're the most chill kind of people ever. They don't want to cause problems or fight. They usually just want to get a bag of Cheetos and sit there and watch TV or whatever. I think the effects of alcohol are far worse than weed can ever be."

Bogut played for Kerr the last two seasons before being traded to Dallas this offseason.

Earlier on Saturday, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson offered their support for Kerr.