Reviewing Terrelle Pryor's first NFL practice

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Reviewing Terrelle Pryor's first NFL practice

ALAMEDA -- So, wondering how Terrelle Pryor looked and felt in his first "official" NFL practice on Wednesday?You'll have to hear from those around him.Pryor declined to speak with waiting reporters in the Raiders locker room following practice, saying he was running late to a meeting. Which is probably a good thing because according to coach Hue Jackson and starting quarterback Jason Campbell, the rookie has been very mindful in such skull sessions."He's really quiet, but at the same time, he still talks," Campbell said. "He'll come up with suggestions. He'll write it on the board: 'I think we should do this on this play.' So I said, 'What, are you our consultant now?'"Campbell laughed.But Pryor's five-game unpaid suspension to begin his NFL career was no laughing matter. Not when it kept him from practicing with the team and limited him to meetings.Campbell called Pryor a "look-alike" and smiled."He's a big, athletic guy," Campbell said. "He's tall, he can run. I think he's just excited to be back on the practice field. Having to sit out for five weeks and, obviously, not receive a paycheck for five weeks, I know kind of stings too."But I think he's obviously excited about being out there with his teammates and getting to learn football and getting to learn our offense and grow together."The Raiders received a one-game roster exemption for Pryor, meaning they can carry 54 players on the roster this week and can have eight inactives on Sunday against Cleveland, so long as Pryor is one of them.Coach Hue Jackson said Pryor needs to both run the scout team in practice as well as learn the Raiders offense."Jason's our starter and Kyle (Boller is) our backup," Jackson said. "Right now (Pryor is) getting the opportunities that he gets, and he's going to earn what he gets. He's talented and I'm looking forward to continue working with him."And as far as how he looked in practice?"I thought he did some good things but we'll continue this week to do that, to get him back in the mix with his teammates so that I can see him a little bit more and evaluate that talent and see where I can put it," Jackson said. "But the young man, I can tell, he did a lot of work prior to today. It shows that he's gotten better."

Oakland police credit Raiders QB Derek Carr for helping find missing child

Oakland police credit Raiders QB Derek Carr for helping find missing child

Raiders quarterback Derek Carr has 247,000 Twitter followers and, given his popularity in the Bay Area, it’s assumed a significant portion stems from this region.

Carr put that megaphone to good use.

Oakland Police sent out an Amber Alert on Saturday hoping to find a young boy gone missing, and Carr retweeted that call for public assistance.

The boy was quickly found after a citizen replied on Twitter and provided information that led to the rescue.

That led an Oakland police officer to credit Carr for helping find the boy.

Carr responded to the news on social media, happy police were able to find a missing child.

Raiders S Karl Joseph named to PFWA All-Rookie team

Raiders S Karl Joseph named to PFWA All-Rookie team

Injury issues bookended Karl Joseph’s rookie year. The Raiders brought their first-round strong safety along slowly while recovering from ACL surgery, keeping him out of defensive action during 2016’s first two games. He missed four at regular-season’s end with a toe injury.

In the middle he played just fine. Joseph was solid against the run and impactful playing deep, allowing him and veteran Reggie Nelson to remain unpredictable in deep coverage.

Joseph finished the year with 60 tackles, an interception and six passes defensed.

That was good enough for recognition on the Pro Football Writers of America’s All-Rookie team, which was released on Tuesday following a vote of the association’s membership.

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott and Los Angeles Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa were the offensive and defensive Rookies of the Year, respectively.