Warriors

Dusty Baker actually had a mini-stroke

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Dusty Baker actually had a mini-stroke

From Comcast SportsNetCINCINNATI (AP) -- Reds manager Dusty Baker had a mini-stroke in addition to his irregular heartbeat last week and will need another week of rest before he's able to rejoin the team for the final regular season series and the playoffs.The 63-year-old manager disclosed his condition to his players on Tuesday before the start of a series against the Milwaukee Brewers.Bench coach Chris Speier and players said Baker was upbeat and visibly thinner."He's lost a lot of water weight," Speier said. "He was anxious (to get back). It was great to see him. Again, he looks really, really good. We're all anxious to get him back in charge."Speier will manage the three-game series against the Brewers and a three-game series in Pittsburgh over the weekend. Baker could return for the final three games in St. Louis starting Monday, followed by the playoffs.The Reds clinched their second NL Central title in the last three years while Baker was still in a Chicago hospital on Saturday night."I'm feeling much better, and it's great being back here in Cincinnati," Baker said, in a statement released after he met with owner Bob Castellini and his players. "Chris Speier and my staff are doing a terrific job, and I look forward to getting back to the dugout."Baker's had an irregular heartbeat for some time. He felt sick while the team was in Chicago for a series last Wednesday and was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital for treatment.Baker revealed that when he was being released from the hospital on Friday, he suffered a mini-stroke."He had some slurred speech," pitcher Bronson Arroyo said, describing the symptoms Baker experienced on Friday. "The diagnosis was a slight stroke. The stroke team was right there and got after it. He said they said they see it all the time. They took care of it."Baker said the immediate treatment "minimized the effects of the stroke." His cardiologists said in the statement that his condition has "improved dramatically" and a full recovery is expected.The Reds beat the Dodgers 6-0 to clinch their second title under Baker on Saturday night. He was released on Sunday and went to the clubhouse briefly after batting practice to talk to his players.He had more appointments with doctors in Cincinnati on Monday, the team's day off. They developed the plan for his return to managing."He looked fine," Arroyo said. "He looked like he'd been on a diet the last two months. He was holding a lot of water. He looks like he went on Jenny Craig. They want him to rest. He said he's ready to go now."Third baseman Scott Rolen said Baker's health is the only consideration as the team prepares for the playoffs. The Reds opened the day with a 92-61 record, a game behind Washington for the best mark in the majors and the top playoff seed in the NL."You take care of each other," Rolen said. "We're a team and friends and could even go as far as family at times. We're concerned about him and his health. We're worried about Dusty. That's the bottom line. You take care of life first."The series against Milwaukee had more importance for the Brewers, who opened the day 3 games behind St. Louis for the final NL wild card.The Reds rested four of their regulars on Sunday, a day after they clinched, but had their usual lineup on the field for the start of the series on Tuesday. Only left fielder Ryan Ludwick, slowed by a sore groin, was out."I think the main thing is you want your team healthy," Speier said. "To me, that's the first and foremost importance. We want to go into the playoffs as healthy as we can and be as ready as we can. That's the fine line."We're trying to win as many ballgames as we can. That's how I look at it as manager."

Report: Warriors sign former Pacers forward

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AP

Report: Warriors sign former Pacers forward

The Warriors reportedly added a player on Wednesday morning.

Golden State signed Georges Niang to a partially guaranteed contract, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski.

The Warriors already have 15 players with fully guaranteed contracts for next season.

It's possible that Niang ends up signing a two-way contract.

Former Oregon big man Chris Boucher inked a two-way deal with the Warriors back in mid-July.

The Pacers selected Niang in the second round (50th overall) of the 2016 draft.

Last year, the power forward appeared in 23 games for Indiana.

He also played in six contests with the Fort Wayne Mad Ants -- averaging 19 points, 7.2 rebounds and 3.3 assists.

The Pacers waived Niang last month.

As a senior at Iowa State, he averaged 20.2 points, 6.2 rebounds and 3.3 assists, while shooting 39 percent from deep.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Lynch anthem issue could use some clarity

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Lynch anthem issue could use some clarity

NAPA – Marshawn Lynch sat during the national anthem during Saturday’s exhibition opener against Arizona. We’re still not sure why.

It’s assumed by many to be in protest of racial inequality and mistreatment of minorities, a timely sentiment following racially fueled violence in Charlottesville, Va.

Uncertainty remains because the Raiders running back hasn’t explained his reasoning. He contemplated speaking after Tuesday’s practice but decided against it.

That leave us left to wonder what was going through Lynch’s head. Was this a case of Marshawn being Marshawn, an unorthodox fellow who often swims upstream? Was he simply enjoying a seat and a banana, or was it politically motivated and worthy of being lumped into national anthem protests by Colin Kaepernick and others in 2016 and Michael Bennett on Sunday?

It seems that way while connecting dots, especially with Lynch’s support for Kaepernick in a 2016 interview with Conan O’Brien. The public doesn’t know for sure. Bennett made his protest crystal clear on Sunday, with an eloquent explanation following Seattle’s exhibition against the Los Angeles Chargers.

Lynch could’ve cleared things up and didn’t. That leaves many left to wonder. Silence, in these cases, breeds speculation. We’ll try to avoid that here. Lynch doesn’t speak to the press, and I don’t mind a bit. This instance is an exception. Insight could direct this unguided narrative with a Tweet, a statement or a few moments in front of a microphone. His message, if there is one, loses power without backing. If it was designed to illuminate issues in this country, Lynch must direct the spotlight. If his choice to sit wasn't socially charged, then let's put the issue to bed and re-focus on Raiders football.

It’s uncertain whether Lynch will address it this week, this season or ever.

The Raiders hope to avoid the topic altogether and let this incident blow over. It hasn’t been a major topic in the locker room. Head coach Jack Del Rio didn’t add anything in his Tuesday press conference, referring to a Saturday postgame statement on the matter where he called it a non-issue.

The Raiders’ belief, it seems, is that a fire won’t burn without fuel.

Del Rio strongly believes in standing at attention for the national anthem. That’s been clear for a year, when he expressed that sentiment following Kaepernick’s anthem protests.

That didn’t stop Raiders linebackers Bruce Irvin and Malcolm Smith from holding up a fist during the national anthem a few times in 2016, though those actions didn’t last long.

Del Rio said Saturday that he respects the fact Lynch is his own man and hasn’t always stood for the national anthem. There were times in Seattle when he wasn’t present for the Star Spangled Banner. There were times he sat and times he stood at attention. He was never asked whether it was a form protest. Kaepernick started the movement last year, one Lynch couldn’t join while retired from football.

There’s no telling what Lynch will do Saturday against the Los Angeles Rams, the first time he’ll represent the Raiders in Oakland. No matter what he does, it’ll be news. With or without an explanation. Lynch doesn’t feel the need to satisfy public demand for insight, and won’t simply bow to public pressure.

Anthem protests can bring attention to social causes, but they’re polarizing to be sure. That’s the case in public, among football fans and cable-news junkies alike.

NFL locker rooms are full of different personalities, united under a common goal. Del Rio wants his guys focused only on that heading toward a season with lofty expectations.

“We want to have a collection of individuals that come together as a team to play football,” Del Rio told USA Today’s Lindsay Jones. “We don't need everybody in the organization to think the same way I think, or have the same feelings that I have about different topics.

“I mean, we're in America. That's one of the things we have. We have the freedom to be ourselves.”

Lynch is certainly his own man, a unique personality who has devoted great time, money and effort to improving his native Oakland.

Bennett explained his motivation for sitting during the anthem in a first-person narrative posted by Yahoo! Sports, and said seeing Lynch sit wasn’t a shock. Bennett also believes Lynch sat down for a cause.

“It didn’t surprise me that Marshawn Lynch sat, too,” Bennett said. “I think he’s one of the people in the forefront who are making changes in the community. That’s what he believes in. I think we both believe in our community, we both believe that people can be great. We don’t believe that this is the end; we believe there’s more out there – there are more things we can do as people, more ways to challenge ourselves.”