Fairfield's Sanchez shocks Reyes with first-round TKO

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Fairfield's Sanchez shocks Reyes with first-round TKO

In an absolute shocker, Fairfields Alan Sanchez delivered a first-round technical knockout of former conqueror Artemio Reyes at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas Friday night.

After a cautious opening minute, a thudding right uppercut from Sanchez (10-2-1, 4 KOs) suddenly had Reyes (15-2, 12 KOs) backpedaling into the ropes.

The Bay Area fighter subsequently took advantage of his foes waning condition, throwing a relentless series of right hands upstairs that would eventually floor a vulnerable Reyes and prompt referee Joe Cortez to stop the fight.

The official time was 2:08.

REWIND: Big bout for blue-collar Sanchez

He was using his jab pretty good, so I thought about moving at first, Sanchez told CSNBayArea.com via telephone after the victory. Then I threw my uppercut really hard, and when I saw he was hurt, I just jumped on him and went for it.

Fridays abrupt ending sharply contrasted their first meeting in June of 2010, a blistering six-round war in Southern California that ended in a split decision victory for Reyes. Sanchez and his team were determined to avenge the defeat.

The plan was to stay on the outside and then go for the knockout in the later rounds, trainer Jesse Lopez Sr. said, but Alan had the opportunity to knock him out right there and he did it.

Reyes, who entered the rematch with a heavy heart having buried his father last week following complications stemming from a car accident, saw a 14-bout winning streak snapped.

The 21-year-old Sanchez handlers, Don Chargin and Jorge Marron, will now try to capitalize on this newfound momentum.

I'm going to talk to Golden Boy Promotions as far as getting him a TV date in Fairfield in June, Chargin said via telephone. As far as a venue, we're looking at either the Fairfield Sports Center or a converted Wal-Mart that can hold more than 1,000 seats.

Since Chargin and Marron took over Sanchez promotional reins, the Fairfield High alum has gone 5-0 and will now probably earn a top 15-20 welterweight (147 lbs.) ranking with one of the main alphabet sanctioning bodies.
RELATED: The Ten Count with Alan Sanchez

You can imagine the people that watched him at home in the Bay Area are proud of what he just did, Chargin added. Were all proud of him.

Sanchez, who works six days a week in a local chicken restaurant as both a cook and a dishwasher, might have to explore fighting full-time following this momentous win.

Im thankful to have a job, but this win was big for my career, Sanchez said. Maybe now I can start training in the gym 100 percent.
CSNBayArea.com Boxing Insider Ryan Maquiana is a member of the Boxing Writers Association of America and Ring Magazines Ratings Panel. E-mail him at rmaquinana@gmail.com, check out his blog at Norcalboxing.net, or follow him on Twitter: @RMaq28.

Anonymous poll: Is Sharks' Burns still Norris frontrunner?

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Anonymous poll: Is Sharks' Burns still Norris frontrunner?

Throughout much of his dominant 2016-17 season, the words “Norris Trophy lock” have often preceded Brent Burns’ name. 

The 32-year-old has led all NHL blueliners in scoring for the past three months, building upon a strong second half last season in which he helped lead the Sharks to their first ever Stanley Cup Final, and solidifying himself as one of the best defensemen in the game.

In 76 games, Burns has 28 goals – 11 more than any other defenseman – and 45 assists for 73 points and a plus-17 rating. At one point on Feb. 19, he had 14 more points than Erik Karlsson, who was second among NHL defensemen.

But Burns went cold earlier this month. During one stretch, he went nine out of 10 games without finding the scoresheet, and finally snapped a 16-game goal drought with an overtime winner on Tuesday against the Rangers.

Meanwhile, Karlsson has been heating up. A two-time Norris Trophy winner in 2012 and 2015, the Senators defenseman has 13 points in his last 14 games. As of Wednesday morning, Karlsson was just five points behind Burns in scoring, with 15 goals and 53 assists for 68 points and a plus-seven rating.

There’s talk Karlsson could take home a third Norris, snatching it out of Burns’ grasp.

But, probably not.

In an anonymous poll among 21 PHWA members, most of whom get a vote for the Norris Trophy at the conclusion of the regular season, Burns’ designation as the frontrunner seems fairly safe with just six games to go in the regular season.

Of the writers polled, including a broad swath from across North America, 14 told CSN they would likely vote for Burns as the league’s best defensemen if the season ended Tuesday night/Wednesday morning. Three were leaning towards Burns, while only four said they would give it to Karlsson.

One writer polled had Burns first, Tampa Bay’s Viktor Hedman second, and Karlsson third.

Of course, 21 votes is just a small sample size of the PHWA membership. Last season, 183 writers took part in voting for the Norris, according to the final tally. Burns finished third in voting, well behind winner Drew Doughty, while Karlsson was second.

Still, as long as Burns stays in front of Karlsson in the scoring race, it appears he remains in line to become the first Sharks defenseman ever to earn a Norris Trophy.

Vin Scully on Dodgers Opening Day: ‘I’ll probably have things to do’

Vin Scully on Dodgers Opening Day: ‘I’ll probably have things to do’

WASHINGTON -- On Monday, the Dodgers will play their first opening day since 1950 without Vin Scully calling their games. He won't be in the stands. He won't make a point of watching on TV, either.

"It's a day game. I'll probably have things to do," the famed 89-year-old announcer told The Associated Press from his home in Hidden Hills, California. "I might catch a piece of it."

Not that Scully has any regrets since retiring after last season. He says he's grateful for every minute he spent with the Dodgers, the franchise he joined 67 years ago in Brooklyn and followed to Los Angeles eight years later. He feels blessed to have worked as long as he did covering the game he fell in love with as a boy.

But he's learned that after a lifetime in the broadcast booth, watching a game as a fan holds little appeal.

"During the World Series back around '77 or '78, there was a game at Dodger Stadium with the Yankees, and I went to the game as a spectator. Now, I hadn't been as a spectator in a long, long time, and I felt somewhat restless that I wasn't broadcasting," Scully recalled Tuesday.

"I did not have the challenge of trying to describe, accurately and quickly, the way it should be done. I just sat there, and I was not happy, I'll be honest. So I realized that although I love the game, what I loved more was broadcasting it," he said.

Scully spoke to the AP because the Library of Congress has announced it will preserve his call of a 1957 game between the Dodgers and the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds, the final time they played at the hallowed old stadium. Both teams moved to California after that season, opening up the West Coast to Major League Baseball.

Scully's call of Sandy Koufax's 1965 perfect game is more famous. But that game at the Polo Grounds meant more to him personally, because he grew up going to games there, cheering for the Giants and dreaming of watching from the press box.

"It was so meaningful to me. I'm not sure what it really means to baseball fans anymore," Scully said. "The sands of time have washed over the Polo Grounds. But for me, it was one of the more memorable games I was ever involved in."

During that broadcast, Scully implored the players to take their time before there franchises left town: "Let's take it easy, we just want to take one last lingering look at both of you." The Library of Congress called it "a masterful example of the artistry that great sports announcers bring to their work, as well as their empathy for players and fans."

Six decades later, Scully is having an easier time letting go. So no plans to keep track Monday when Los Angeles plays the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium.

"All summer long, I expect to get feelings of nostalgia, wistfulness, whatever the word may be, but no, I am comfortable, I do know in my heart and soul I am where I should be, and that really is all I need," he said.

"Sure, after 67 years, you'll bet I'll miss it," he added. "But heck, I miss the guys I hung out with when I was in school."