Giants

Flat Warriors run through by Nash, Suns

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Flat Warriors run through by Nash, Suns

Feb. 10, 2011BOX SCORE WARRIORS VIDEONBA PAGE NBA SCOREBOARD

PHOENIX (AP) Three days after his 37th birthday, Steve Nash has the Phoenix Suns finally back at .500 for the season. He even got a little extra rest, too.The Suns' seemingly ageless playmaker had 18 points and 11 assists, then sat out the fourth quarter on Thursday night and watched Phoenix complete a 112-88 rout of the Golden State Warriors, the Suns' most one-sided win this season.Channing Frye added 17 points and nine rebounds as the Suns beat the Warriors for the second time in four nights to climb to .500 (25-25) for the first time since Dec. 19."We'd like to be at about .650 but we have a lot of work to do," Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry said. "I thought we did a good job. We took care of business right from the start."Ekpe Udoh and Brandan Wright scored 16 apiece for the Warriors. Monta Ellis, the fourth-leading scorer in the NBA at 25.4 points per game, managed just eight on 4 of 13 shooting.
COHN: Where does Monta rank among NBA's best SGs
The Suns made it a blowout with a 20-0 run, the last 14 points of the first half and first six of the second, to go up 71-42, Phoenix's biggest lead against anyone this season - up to that point. The Warriors missed 13 shots during that stretch.Phoenix led by as many as 33 in the fourth quarter."Our defense has been pretty good the last couple of weeks," Nash said. "That has given us an opportunity to take some pressure off the offense and build some leads."Jared Dudley scored 13 points, including his first dunk of the season, and Robin Lopez had 12 for Phoenix. Rookie Zabian Dowdell, signed to fill in for injured Goran Dragic, scored 10 - six more than he'd ever had in an NBA game.Dudley, who had promised 10 dunks this season, got plenty of grief from his teammates after he finally got one."Man, Dudley made one and I missed one," Frye said. "Somebody should go outside and see if pigs are flying."Phoenix, winner of five of its past six overall, won its 28th straight at home against a Pacific Division foe not named the Los Angeles Lakers.The Warriors shot 40 percent lowering the Suns' opposition field goal shooting to 42.3 percent in the past 11 games. Only Miami and Boston have done better in that brief span.Golden State had won four of five overall, most recently 116-114 over Denver on Wednesday night. Both losses in its past six came against the Suns.
REWIND: Warriors send Nuggets packing on Monta's 37
Coach Keith Smart said that his team lacked the energy necessary to keep up with the Suns."You share with the younger players how hard it is that you have to play every night in the NBA, back to back in particular," he said, "but there's nothing you can do with it. We didn't play well to start the game off in the first half. We didn't have the energy we needed to have against this team."The Warriors - coming off an eight-game home stand - scored the first two points Thursday night, then never led again.The 14-0 surge to finish the half was part of a 17-3 overall outburst that put Phoenix ahead 65-42 at the break. The Suns shot 60 percent for the half, with Nash leading the way with 14 points and eight assists.Frye made a jumper, then Vince Carter scored twice to start the third quarter. The 20-point run finally ended when Ellis hit a 14-footer with 8:38 left in the third quarter.Golden State is 0-3 against Phoenix this season."It was bad from start to finish, similar to the last game we played them," the Warriors' David Lee said. "I feel like we got outplayed at all five positions from the start of the game to the end."Notes: Nash was 3 of 3 at the foul line to move back ahead of Mark Price as the most accurate free-throw shooter in NBA history, 90.3916 percent to Price's 90.3895 percent. Price is an assistant coach for the Warriors. ... Dragic missed his fifth straight game after cutting his left foot stepping on glass at his home . ... The Suns have won 10 of 14. .. Phoenix goes to Salt Lake City to face Utah on Friday night in the Jazz's first game since coach Jerry Sloan resigned on Thursday. ... The Suns had never led by more than 25 this season and hadn't won by more than 18. ... Ellis was 9 of 30 shooting the past two games against Phoenix.

'We're not the worst' banner at stake in Giants-Phillies series

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AP

'We're not the worst' banner at stake in Giants-Phillies series

Nobody is paying much attention to this, and for good reason I grant you, but the Giants could end the suspense over which bad National League team is the worst National League team this weekend.

Plan your snacking regimen accordingly.

San Francisco beat Philadelphia last night, 5-4, to widen its stranglehold on 14th place in the National League to four full games. Further success this weekend could widen that to five or even eight games, and that would almost be enough to create an impromptu parade around the ballpark.

The Giants’ future is too amorphous to consider quite yet – we know this by the absurd suggestions that they could be the next home for Giancarlo Stanton.

And you thought the Warriors-to-chase-Paul-George stories were absurd.

But we digress.

The Giants are still figuring out what a rebuild would look like, and how that rebuild would manifest itself, but until it does, there is still the Ypres-like slog of the 2017 season to endure. And this weekend right here is about all that is left.

There is no spoiling the Dodgers’ march to regular season glory. There are no postseason awards for any individual to chase. Catching the Padres for fourth seems increasingly unlikely.

Now there could be a question about whether Bruce Bochy wants to return but none about whether the Giants would do anything to him, and if you need something to chew on, Bobby Evans’ longterm future as general manager might be sufficiently gristly, though we doubt it will result in anything.

There is only the raising of the “WE’RE NOT THE WORST” banner over the promenade in right field. And this looks like the weekend when it can be best be decided. Like we said, snack accordingly.

Down on the Farm: When Lincecum looked like batboy, became Giant in San Jose

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AP

Down on the Farm: When Lincecum looked like batboy, became Giant in San Jose

The last time Tim Lincecum pitched on a MLB mound was Aug. 5, 2016. Lincecum only lasted 3 1/3 innings in front of his hometown Seattle fans while doused in Angels red. The final image of Lincecum may be in an Angels jersey, but it's also with a Giants-orange glove on his left hand. 

If that is the last time Lincecum ever pitches again in the bigs, Aug. 5, 2016 will go down as a date many hope to forget as The Freak was a diminished version of himself. Remember the date, not so much the year. 

Exactly 10 years before that last pitch, Lincecum became Giant. Only two months after going No. 10 overall in the 2006 MLB Draft, Lincecum made his San Jose Giants debut on Aug. 5, 2006. He started the game against the Bakersfield Blaze and allowed two earned runs over 2 2/3 innings pitched while striking out five. 

Lincecum's stint in San Jose only lasted six games, including Game 1 of the playoffs. At 22 years old, Lincecum went 2-0 with a 1.95 ERA, struck out 48 batters in 27.2 innings pitched, and held opposing hitters to a .135 batting average, which somehow is a career-high for his time in the minors with Giants affiliates.

Here's how Joe Ritzo, the voice of the San Jose Giants, remembers the time San Jose fans witnessed a sight unlike anything else with Lincecum.  

Q: What was your first impression of Lincecum in San Jose? 

A: Unique talent. Everyone knew he was a first-round draft pick and there was a lot of hype and a lot of high expectations for him when he joined us. He went out there and was just dominant from the very first start. He was just a fun guy to watch because he gave you such a different look out there as a smaller pitcher with an unusual motion and then the ball coming out at 95, 96 miles an hour with this big curve ball as well that hitters in the California League just couldn't touch. And he was going up against hitters in this league -- in many cases with two, three, four years of professional experience -- and Tim was playing college baseball two months earlier.

I thought he was the best pitcher in this league when he was there those final six or so weeks of the season. A lot of fun to watch. I think our fans here really looked forward to his starts because you had a pretty good idea he probably wasn't going to be in San Jose for too long. 

Q: Did he remind you anybody else or was he completely different? 

A: Oh no, I mean he was totally his own guy. He was a very unique pitcher and the way he operated out there with the motion that not a lot of people had seen before. It was like something I don't think anyone had ever really experienced that year in San Jose. 

I remember our manager back then, Lenn Sakata, saying that when he first saw Tim when he walked in he thought he was the batboy. It was just this little guy with this baby face. It was like, 'No, that's your new ace pitcher.' Then he went out there and was just spectacular and kind of made you sit up in your chair and go, 'Whoa! This guy could be sometin' special.'

Q: Was that your real first impression? Just how he looked so small, but was amazing on the mound. 

A: Yeah, I mean he looked like a kid out there. Like I said earlier, I think he was the best pitcher in the California League those final few weeks of the season and he was our Game 1 starter in the playoffs that September, and won that start. I think we all knew that he was gonna move quickly through the system with what we saw here in San Jose. 

Q: Is he the best pitcher you've ever seen at that level? 

A: I think he's the best pitcher I've seen here in San Jose. Madison Bumgarner was pretty spectacular as well, and like Tim, was only here for a short amount of time. But Tim, the stuff was just electric. And you had a feeling watching him, he could probably go up to the big leagues the next day and get people out.

He goes to Triple-A the next year, I think he was only there for a month, and then he's in the big leagues so that kind of turned out to be pretty true. A special talent. 

Q: With the Giants, what is your favorite Tim Lincecum memory? 

A: My favorite memory was how he pitched the final game of the World Series in 2010. I grew up in the Bay Area, I grew up a Giants fan and I was a fan like anyone else that October and was all caught up in what was going on with that team and loving every minute of it. He was outstanding as everyone knows during that playoff run and it was fitting that he got a chance to be out there in what turned out to be the clinching game in Texas.

That I think was the moment for me that sticks with me after all these years with Tim Lincecum as a Giant. 

Q: Do you think we'll ever see someone else like a Tim Lincecum? 

A: I don't know. I don't know how you teach what he did. It clearly worked for him. I'm not sure if we'll ever see anything like that ever again. It was pretty incredible watching him here in San Jose because it was like a motion we've never seen. I think at that time, he wasn't really refined as the pitcher that he became at the major league level with changing speeds a lot, becoming more of a pitcher.

He was flat out overpowering in San Jose and they couldn't hit him here. I don't know if we'll ever see anything quite like that motion and the size, just the whole package he had back then.