Former aide says she saw trainer inject Bonds

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Former aide says she saw trainer inject Bonds

March 31, 2011

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Tears streaming from her eyes, Barry Bonds' former personal shopper became the first and only one of the government's 23 witnesses at his federal trial to say she saw the all-time home run leader getting an injection from his trainer.

Kathy Hoskins was the first eyewitness to testify that Bonds' personal trainer Greg Anderson, who was later convicted of dealing steroids injected the slugger. She said Thursday that the scene unfolded at Bonds' well-appointed Bay Area home in 2002. As part of her job, she packed the baseball star's clothes for road trips.

Anderson came into the bedroom as she was filling a suitcase.

"Barry was like, 'Let's do it right here,'" she testified, using a tissue to repeatedly dab at her eyes and brow.

"'This is Kathy. That's my girl. She ain't going to say nothing to nobody,'" she quoted Bonds as saying. "So Greg shot him in the belly button."

"It was a regular, normal-size syringe," she said.

Hoskins said she didn't ask about the injection, but Bonds volunteered that it was "a little something, something for when I go on the road. You can't detect it. You can't catch it."

Bonds is charged with four counts of making false statements and obstruction of justice for telling a federal grand jury in 2003 that Anderson never provided him with steroids and human growth hormone, and that only physicians injected him.

Wearing a boyish shirt and purple necktie, her long, braided hair pulled back, Hoskins accused her brother former Bonds' business partner Steve Hoskins of telling her story to federal prosecutors, causing her to have to testify against Bonds.

"He threw me under the bus," she said.

In his last question to her, Assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew Parrella asked Hoskins: "Are you testifying here just to back your brother up?"

"Absolutely not," she said before adding, with tears dripping down her face and voice breaking up, "I was put in the middle of it."

Dr. Don Catlin, former head of the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory, then testified about his 2006 discovery of Tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), the designed steroid known as "the clear." Bonds' urine sample, which was negative for steroids in baseball's 2003 survey test, was positive for THG three years later after Catlin's lab developed a test and also for the female fertility drug clomiphene.

The government says it likely will rest its case after Catlin steps down Monday and portions of Bonds' grand jury testimony are read into the record, although additional scientific witnesses could be called to support Catlin. After that, the defense can start presenting witness.

Earlier Thursday, Bonds' physician Dr. Arthur Ting contradicted the testimony of Steve Hoskins, who told the jury last week that he had as many as 50 discussions about Bonds' alleged steroid use with Ting. Hoskins also testified that Ting told him Bonds' 1999 elbow injury, which required surgery, was caused by taking steroids.

But Ting repeatedly denied Hoskins' accounts under cross-examination from defense lawyer Cristina Arguedas.

"Did you emerge from the surgery and say to Stevie Hoskins in April 1999 that was an injury caused by steroids?" she asked.

"No," he answered.

"Did Stevie consult with you about specific steroids like Winstrol and Deca?"

"No," he responded.

"Did Stevie call you on the telephone, describe steroids for you, tell you to go check them out and then tell you to call him back when you could describe the side effects of specific steroids?"

"Never," he said.

Later, the lawyers on both sides seemed surprised that Ting's story conflicted so sharply with that of Hoskins.

During a break outside the presence of the jury, Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Nedrow acknowledged to U.S. District Judge Susan Illston that there were inconsistencies between the testimony of Ting and Hoskins, who the prosecutor also conceded had been "impeached heavily."

Arguedas complained to the judge that the government had an obligation to disclose testimony from Ting that would be beneficial to Bonds long before the trial, citing a meeting Ting had with prosecutors before he testified to a grand jury in 2006.

"If this government doesn't recognize that, then they have to go back to school," she said.

Nedrow said that Thursday was the first time he heard Ting contradict Hoskins so heavily.

Illston is considering Arguedas' request to hold an evidentiary hearing to determine if any government official had details of Ting's testimony and, if so, why it wasn't disclosed to Bonds' attorneys. Nedrow claims it wasn't a substantive meeting and prosecutors have been unable to find notes from it.

Ting, an orthopedic surgeon who has operated on Bonds eight times, also testified that he prescribed corticosteroids which are not muscle-building like anabolic steroids to ease swelling after surgery. Ting said those type of steroids have side effects that are similar to performance-enhancing steroids acne, weight gain, mood swings and loss of libido.

San Jose Sharks fans may have just witnessed the end of an era

San Jose Sharks fans may have just witnessed the end of an era

Melodrama demands that San Jose’s exit from the Stanley Cup playoffs be portrayed as the very likely end of the Joe Thornton/Patrick Marleau Era.

It probably won’t work that way, and probably shouldn't as will be explained further down your reading, but when you get shoved out of the postseason in your own building, melancholy is the order of the day. Even if the melancholy isn’t for any player in particular, but for an entire era.

Nobody will blame Saturday’s 3-1 loss in Game 6 of the Western Conference quarterfinal on bad luck (although Joe Pavelski going crossbar/post on the final power play of their season was close enough to it), or unjust officiating, or even lousy ice (though that was a fairly clear by-product for those who like their hockey a little less sticky). Edmonton took advantage of two critical Sharks errors 56 seconds apart in the second period, Oiler goaltender Cam Talbot cheated the gods multiple times when the Sharks weren’t vomiting up chances on their own, and young legs joined up with growing know-how to make this a just outcome.

But for Thornton and Marleau, a quick round of 30-on-1 interviews asking them if they thought their days in Finville Heights had finally come to an end were their mutual introduction to yet another unfulfilling offseason.

And a team whose core is among the league’s oldest was just exposed for that very flaw by a team that, in head coach Todd McLellan’s words, “Grew up, learned how to get into the playoffs, how to get a lead, how to play with it, and how to deal with a desperate team at the end of a game. Now we’ll see what they have to learn next.”

That learning will comes against the Anaheim Ducks, who are 15-0-3 in their last 18 games, including four straight against the Calgary Flames.

As for the rest of it, Edmonton earned its advancement without a big series, or even a single big game, from Connor McDavid. Rather, their difference makers were Talbot, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins (whose work with Jordan Eberle and Milan Lucic against the Marleau-Thornton-Pavelski line was the defining matchup) Leon Draisaitl (after a rocky start), Oskar Klefbom (their best defenseman), Zack Kassian (who made the most of his 15 minutes of fame), and Drake Caggiula (whose promotion to the McDavid line at the expense of Patrick Maroon helped wake up Draisaitl).

Plus, McLellan finally got to deliver a rebuttal for his firing by the Sharks two years ago. He didn’t, of course, at least not where anyone could hear it, but the exploding fumigant of the 2015 season never sat right with him as the one who paid the full retail price. Now, with this result, he can let the NHL’s Stanley Cup media guide do the talking for him.

That, and having the team of the future, while San Jose is trying to sort out its past. This is a closing window, one which stayed open a very long time and actually pried itself back open a year ago for the run that took them to the Cup final, but it is now clear that they play at a pace the modern game has outrun. Thornton is still hugely important (he remained an impact player despite the leg injury that cost him Games 1 and 2), and there are no clear young replacements for the central group.

This is why all the melodramatic speculations about Thornton and Marleau in particular and perhaps the entire era ignore one central truth – there are not nearly enough replacements for a reboot, or even a course correction. They may be stuck as what they are – a group whose veterans are still their best players, playing a game that younger and faster players are likely to do better. The Pacific Division, being easily the thinnest of the four, may allow one more year of status quo, but while the day of reckoning has not yet arrived, the method is now clear.

And Edmonton, young, impetuous, sprightly and McLellanized Edmonton, has been the instrument of San Jose’s education.

Steph Curry keeps game ball for Steve Kerr after he misses Game 3

Steph Curry keeps game ball for Steve Kerr after he misses Game 3

While head coach Steve Kerr was unable to make Saturday's Game 3 due to an illness, the Warriors went out and took a 3-0 series lead over the Blazers. 

After the game, Steph Curry dedicated the win to Kerr by keeping the game ball for him. 

"Our coach is going through a lot right now physically and he told us this morning this is a situation where we need to rally and go out and win a game for him, but we felt like that," Curry said after the Warriors' 119-113 win. "The way that game had gone on we had to fight and do it for him. 

"The way that he said it was we had to win one for The Gipper, so shout out to coach Kerr." 

Curry led the Warriors with 34 points in Saturday's win.