Giants blow two leads, lose to Padres 5-3 again

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Giants blow two leads, lose to Padres 5-3 again

July 5, 2011BOXSCORE GIANTSVIDEOMLBPAGE MLBSCOREBOARD
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Heath Bell made the ninth inning a little more interesting than the San Diego Padres would prefer for the second straight game, and even he had to take a moment on the mound to chuckle at the coincidence."Apparently I wanted to face the same guys," Bell said.As long the result is the same, the Padres have no problem with all the drama.Bell rallied to get the final two outs to keep pace for the major league lead with 26 saves, and the Padres held on to beat the San Francisco Giants 5-3 again Tuesday night.Cameron Maybin had three hits and three RBIs, and Anthony Rizzo drove in two runs to power the Padres past the NL West-leading Giants by the same score two days in a row."Every game is different, but this is nothing new to Padres-Giants games," said San Diego manager Bud Black, whose team was eliminated from playoff contention at AT&T Park on the final day last season.Maybin's triple highlighted a three-run sixth inning off Matt Cain (7-5), who lost for the first time in more than a month. San Diego has won seven of nine.Tim Stauffer (5-5) allowed three runs in six innings for his third straight victory. He allowed three hits and walked one.The Padres again used a formula that the defending World Series champions have replicated so many times: strong starting pitching, timely hitting and a bullpen with a flair for the dramatic that doesn't budge.Miguel Tejada and pinch-hitter Pat Burrell started the ninth with singles. Chris Stewart's sacrifice bunt moved them to third and second.Then San Diego's All-Star closer struck out Andres Torres and got Brandon Crawford to fly out to right field. The Padres improved to 33-0 this season when leading after eight innings."I actually thought I was better today," Bell said, smiling. "I'll take it."San Diego again quieted a fast San Francisco start with its own dose of powerful pitching.Torres scored from first on a hard-hit single by Crawford that second baseman Orlando Hudson couldn't corral in the first inning, backpedaling into right field and losing the ball trying to toss it back to the infield. Aaron Rowand's two-out single later in the inning gave San Francisco a 2-0 lead.The Padres answered back in the second when Ryan Ludwick singled and Hudson followed with a double. Ludwick scored on a groundout by Rizzo and Hudson scored on a fielding error by Crawford at short, tying the score 2-all.Cain helped his own cause with a single up the middle in the fourth that drove in Tejada to put San Francisco ahead 3-2. Tejada was hit by a pitch and would've easily been caught stealing if not for shortstop Jason Bartlett mishandling the throw, allowing Tejada to move to third and Cain a chance for his third RBI of the season.Cain, who hadn't lost since May 29 at Milwaukee, seemed to be in complete control. After a two-out walk to Hudson in the sixth, he started to unravel.Maybin smacked a ball into the left-center gap for a two-run triple, and Rizzo followed with an RBI single to give San Diego a 5-3 lead. Backed by a strong bullpen, that was more than enough for the Padres."It kind of came down to that one pitch and I didn't make that pitch," Cain said. "It cost us the game."About the only hiccup before the ninth came when Torres drew a 16-pitch walk off Chad Qualls in the seventh. He stole second uncontested, move to third on a groundout and was tagged out at home trying to score on a wild pitch.Qualls pumped his fist and slammed the ball to the ground afterward."That cannot happen," Torres said. "I was going to go but then I stopped. But if I had gone right away, I could have made it. I thought I had a shot."NOTES: Tejada was at second base for the first time in his 15-year major league career, moving over from short to start in place of the injured Emmanuel Burriss (sore right knee). Burriss grounded out as a pinch-hitter in the seventh. ... Three fans sitting near the Padres dugout were hit by a wayward bat from Giants slugger Pablo Sandoval in the first inning. One woman was struck in the head and taken to a hospital as a precaution, a Giants spokesman said. Two men received treatment in the eyebrow and shin and stayed at the game. ... Another fan interrupted the game for about 2 minutes in the eighth inning, running onto the field and taking his shirt off. The man gave himself up without incident. ... Sandoval extended his career-high hitting streak to 16 straight games with a single in the third.

Trio of A's rookies make history in win over White Sox

Trio of A's rookies make history in win over White Sox

BOX SCORE

CHICAGO -- Matt Olson hit his first two major league home runs, Jaycob Brugman and Franklin Barreto also launched their first career shots and the Oakland Athletics routed the Chicago White Sox 10-2 on Saturday.

Olson, Brugman and Barreto became the second trio of teammates to hit their first home runs in the same game, the Elias Sports Bureau said. It also happened in 1914 with the Kansas City Packers of the Federal League - the rival circuit lasted a couple of seasons, and included many big leaguers.

Former White Sox ace Mark Buehrle had his No. 56 jersey retired in a pregame ceremony. After the 30-minute tribute ended, the A's roughed up James Shields (1-1).

Daniel Gossett (1-2) took advantage of an early 6-0 lead to win for the first time in three big league starts. He gave up two unearned runs in six innings.

White Sox manager Rick Renteria was ejected for the second straight game. He threw his hat to the ground and was tossed, right after third baseman Todd Frazier was ejected for showing his displeasure over a replay review that wasn't reversed.

Jones finally gets the call, will be Giants' everyday third baseman for now

Jones finally gets the call, will be Giants' everyday third baseman for now

SAN FRANCISCO — Ryder Jones is 23 years old and Christian Arroyo just turned 22, so when Jones got the call to the big leagues, the first step in the preparation process was about what you would expect. Jones and Arroyo fired up the PlayStation and Arroyo started pumping pitches as Jacob deGrom, the starter Jones will face in his debut Saturday. 

“I faced him last night and got a hit and a pop-up,” Jones said, smiling. 

The real thing will be considerably tougher, but Jones said he’s looking forward to the challenge, noting that deGrom will help make his debut that much more memorable. The Giants are looking forward to the debut, too. Jones is a player Bruce Bochy has been eyeing for a while, and he has finally been deemed ready. 

While Eduardo Nuñez is on the disabled list, Jones will be the everyday third baseman. He’s hitting seventh Saturday, one spot ahead of 24-year-old Austin Slater. Arroyo is sidelined by a bone bruise but he should join the other two at some point later this season. 

“Unfortunately we’ve put ourselves in a position here (with our record) where we’re going to look at younger players, but the good thing is that these guys are going to get a chance to show what they can do,” Bochy said. “They’re going to get some playing time. I look forward to watching him play.”

Jones took Aaron Hill’s roster spot after the veteran was designated for assignment. Bochy said Hill was one of his favorite players to manage, noting his professionalism and solid at-bats, despite the .132 average. He hopes Hill gets a shot on a contender, but that won’t be the case in San Francisco this year, and the Jones promotion was the latest indication that a rebuild/reload is underway. 

Drafted in the second round in 2013 — one round after Arroyo — Jones can play third, first and left field. He has more power than most in the farm system, and he’s athletic enough to handle three spots. The Giants will live with the mistakes at third for now, hopeful that the big arm can stick there. 

Jones was batting .299 with 10 homers and 16 doubles in 53 games for the River Cats. The knock on him has always been a lack of patience at the plate, but he has upped his on-base percentage to .390, a jump of 99 points from his 2016 season in Double-A. In June, Jones had put together a .343/.450/.701 slash line. 

“Patience at the plate is the biggest thing for me,” he said. “If you look at all my years in the minors, I was a little aggressive and antsy. You learn as you get older that you have to pick a pitch you can drive.”

The new approach has Jones in a big league lineup -- the real thing, not the video game version. He went millennial with his preparation, but his promotion was as old-school as it gets. The River Cats have a doubleheader Saturday and when Jones reached third base in Friday night’s game, manager Dave Brundage told him he would get one of the two games off. 

“I told him I could play two,” Jones said. “I know we have some older guys there.”

Brundage called him in later and told him he would only be playing the night game on Saturday. 

“But you’ll be in San Francisco,” the manager added. 

Jones called his parents, who will be in attendance, along with his brother and girlfriend. Then he fired up the PlayStation, packed, and prepared for a short flight to San Francisco. He was still so fired up Saturday morning that he couldn’t handle more than a 30-minute nap. 

“I didn’t know what time I could come to the park,” he said. “I couldn’t sleep.”