Raiders

Giants walk-off on Schierholtz's pinch-hit single

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Giants walk-off on Schierholtz's pinch-hit single

June 10, 2011BOX SCORE GIANTS VIDEOMLB PAGE MLB SCOREBOARD
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) The San Francisco Giants latest last at-bat win came at a serious price for the defending World Series champs.Second baseman Freddy Sanchez dislocated his shoulder in the Giants' 3-2 win over the Cincinnati Reds on Friday night and will undergo further tests to determine the severity of the injury and how long he'll be out. URBAN: Sanchez injury stunning, sad, standard
With catcher Buster Posey already out for the season and Pablo Sandoval still on the disabled list, the loss of Sanchez counts as a major blow."We have to keep fighting and moving forward," said Andres Torres, who scored the winning run on pinch-hitter Nate Schierholtz's two-out single in the ninth. "That's how we did it last year, too. Freddy's a big part of us but we have to move on."Sanchez made a backhand grab of Brandon Phillips' sharp grounder up the middle in the fifth but used his right hand to brace himself as he slid on the edge of the outfield grass. Sanchez, who underwent surgery on his left shoulder in December, sat on his knees and flicked the ball away with his glove hand as manager Bruce Bochy and assistant athletic trainer Mark Gruesbeck rushed out from the dugout.Sanchez was later helped up and walked off the field but with his right arm held up by Gruesbeck. Bochy said Sanchez will undergo an MRI test soon."I can't tell you how long or how serious (it is)," Bochy said. "That's a lot, what we're taking right now. They'll keep grinding and moving forward. There's not much else you can do. We feel horrible for Freddy, a great player we'll certainly miss, but we'll move on."News of Sanchez's injury put a downer on what was an otherwise feel-good night for San Francisco, tied Kansas City for most walkoff wins in the majors this season.Torres, who entered as a pinch hitter in the seventh, started the ninth with a walk against Jose Arredondo (0-1). After an intentional walk to Miguel Tejada, Bill Bray came on to strike out rookie Brandon Crawford. Manager Dusty Baker then brought in Logan Ondrusek, who walked Cody Ross before Schierholtz hit for Brian Wilson (5-1)."Walks late in the game will certainly haunt you," Reds manager Dusty Baker said. "That was a tough loss. We have had quite a few of those."With his team slumping at the plate, Bochy juggled his lineup and moved Ross into the cleanup spot while dropping Aubrey Huff to the No. 6 slot.The changes provided an early spark and San Francisco kept it close until Schierholtz came up with his clutch hit."They don't make excuses," Bochy said. "It's somebody different every day it seems like. They don't dwell on what's happened."San Francisco, held to five hits or fewer in four of its previous six games, had five in the first three innings against Travis Wood.Tejada hit a ground-rule double in the first and scored when Ross lined a single to left. Ross was thrown out at second on the play but after Tejada crossed the plate.Cincinnati scored in the fourth and fifth to take the lead. Scott Rolen started the fourth with a triple off Ryan Vogelsong and scored on Ryan Hanigan's single. Chris Heisey drove in Phillips with a grounder in the fifth.That ended Vogelsong's six-game streak of allowing one run or less. The right-hander, who was the first Giants pitcher to have such a streak since Matt Cain in 2006, left after six innings with six strikeouts and three walks.The fifth was a rough inning all around for San Francisco.Tejada tied it with a two-out double in the fifth and San Francisco had runners in scoring position in the sixth and eighth but failed to score.Wood, who allowed eight runs and a career-high five walks last Sunday, was crisper in his first career start against the Giants. The left-hander gave up 10 hits and walked three over eight innings in his sixth no-decision of the season.Wilson struck out one and allowed a hit in the ninth inning while picking up the win.NOTES: San Francisco LHP Barry Zito will make his second rehab start Saturday against Class-A Modesto, and the team is hoping he can throw around 100 pitches. ... 3B Pablo Sandoval, expected to come off the disabled list and rejoin the Giants next week in Arizona, had two hits and two RBIs for Triple-A Fresno. ... Reds LHP Aroldis Chapman (shoulder inflammation) allowed two earned runs in 1 2-3 innings in a rehab start for Triple-A Louisville. ... Reds RHP Homer Bailey (sprained right shoulder) will begin a minor league rehab assignment on Saturday.

Raiders to release OL Austin Howard

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Raiders to release OL Austin Howard

The Raiders will release Austin Howard, one of their big free-agent signings from the 2014 offseason. The offensive lineman was informed of his released late Thursday or early Friday, according to a league source.

The player confirmed the separation on social media late Thursday night with this post: 

Howard was scheduled to make $4.9 million in base salary this season, with $2.4 million in dead money against the salary cap. The Raiders can afford the cap hit, but will enjoy the slowing salary cash flow in 2017.

Howard was one of the team’s biggest signings in 2014, inking a five-year, $30 million contract with the Raiders early in the 2014 unrestricted free agent signing period. Howard played right guard in his first season, but moved to tackle in the following two years. He made 39 starts in three seasons in silver and black, most at right tackle.

Howard played 2016 under duress. He worked through an ankle issue that season and had offseason shoulder surgery that impacted him throughout the Raiders offseason program.

He regained health this summer, but the Raiders chose to part ways with the veteran and focus on other options at right tackle. Marshall Newhouse has pole position in the position battle, but Vadal Alexander will challenge him for a starting spot. Rookie forth-round pick David Sharpe also has interest there.

That left Howard with a too-high salary entering a tight position battle, making him expendable when compared with other players along a stacked offensive line.

The Raiders will have two spots available on their 90-man roster, with Howard and running back Taiwan Jones being released. 

Here is Howard's full Instagram post: 

 

OAKLAND!!! A lifetime of memories have been made these past three years, and I am grateful for every single one of them. Unfortunately my time with the #Raiders has come to an end. To my OL dawgs, love y'all boys. #RaiderNation appreciate all your support, you guys are like none other. I came to Oakland my first year with a start of 0-10... through hard work and dedication we built a team that had more success it had in years, and thus we turned this group of players into a play-off bound and elite team. Starting on this Offensive line for the majority of that time is something that I'll never forget. One thing I can say is that no matter the situation, no matter if it was battling through injury, or political scrutiny that this business demands, I left it all out the for my teammates and always had and will always have their back. I will always be proud of that. Thank you to Mr. Davis and the Raiders organization/coaches that allowed me this opportunity. Thank you to my family, especially my parents, siblings, my friends, my agent Kevin Robinson, and last but DEFINITELY not least my beautiful wife Larissa who has been with me since the beginning, and through the thick and thin and has SELFLESSLY been the REAL reason that I've been able to do my job on the field for the passed seven seasons, for all your love, support, encouragement and prayers! To my baby girl, Daddy loves you and couldn't imagine this life without you! Having an opportunity and blessing to share all of this with you has been the biggest gift of all...As upsetting as it is, that "business" gets in the way of a good thing, I know that this is not the end of my NFL journey. Looking forward to what God has planned for me next... #DoubleSevens #NotDone #SomethingBigComingNext #NFL #DontBlink #Challenge #ImUpForIt #MovingForward #TrainsComin #GodIsGood #WatchThis #Oakland #YearEight #SeeYouSoon #UNI #Panthers

A post shared by Austin Howard (@realaustinhoward77) on Jul 28, 2017 at 12:38am PDT

49ers' head coach Kyle Shanahan takes pride in speed of offense

49ers' head coach Kyle Shanahan takes pride in speed of offense

SANTA CLARA – If there is any validity to Matt Ryan’s complaint that former Atlanta Falcons offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan struggled getting play calls to his quarterback in a timely fashion, it is difficult to find much evidence.

The past two seasons, only three teams went through an entire season without the play clock expiring on offense. The Falcons under Shanahan went without a delay-of-game penalty both of the past two seasons. The Denver Broncos of last season were the only other offensive unit in the NFL that was not penalized for the play clock hitting :00.

“Any play-caller that you talk to that’s usually one of the most important things and something I pride myself on a lot, is how quick can you get a play call into a quarterback,” said Shanahan, who will remain the playcaller for the 49ers while also serving as head coach.

"And the quicker you do the more comfortable it is, not just for him but the entire offense. They’re not panicked. They’re being able to move to the line. And with me as a coordinator personally, I try almost every situation to get it in as fast as possible. And I can be honest, there’s sometimes I do better than others. There are sometimes I don’t do it as good. There’s sometimes I do it real good.”

Shanahan said he took a lot of pride in the fact that the Falcons avoided any delay-of-game penalties the past two seasons. He said Ryan deserves credit, too.

“I was really proud of those guys on offense, which is a lot of credit to Matt and the rest of the guys, that regardless when we did get it in, two years straight without a delay of game and being the only team to even do that one year I think was a pretty impressive task,” Shanahan said. “We did a good job of that as a whole.”

In a recent interview with Pete Prisco of CBS Sports, Ryan was critical of Shanahan’s timeliness in delivering the play calls in the Falcons' collapse in Super Bowl 51. (It did not appear the Falcons' offense was scrambling to get to the line of scrimmage and get the ball snapped after the built a 28-3 lead.)

“Kyle's play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in," Ryan told Prisco. "As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you're talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, 'There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.' You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.”

Shanahan said on Thursday that he wants his offense to play fast. Shanahan said he sets his offense so there is no need to audible out of a play if the defense is geared to stop the primary option on a particular call.

“If it’s not the perfect play, there’s usually four other options that you’ve just got to adjust to and either get an incompletion or get a smaller gain,” Shanahan said. “But, it’s not, ‘Hey, if I don’t call the perfect play, you check and get us into the perfect play.’

"I’ve been in systems like that and it’s just what your opinion is, and there’s really no right answer, but I was pretty happy with how our system worked in Atlanta. And I’ve been confident with players playing fast and not putting so much pressure on them to fix every play that the coordinator calls. I like to put a little more on myself and I want them when I do call a bad play, we’ll give you an answer."

Shanahan will continue to call the plays from the sideline. Quarterback Brian Hoyer said he insisted on working on the radio communication during the offseason program. Hoyer played in Shanahan's offense in 2014 with the Cleveland Browns, and he said that experience should help him relay the calls more smoothly to his teammates in the huddle.

"I kind of have a method of I want to be just outside the huddle when the play is coming out," Hoyer said. "I don’t want to be in the huddle trying to give the play while he’s talking to me. I want to hear him say the play in my helmet, take a second, get in the huddle and then call the play.

"Back in Cleveland when I was just learning the system I was just trying to repeat what he was saying, get it to the team and then as I’m walking to the line of scrimmage think of the play. Whereas now, I hear the play coming in and I can paint a picture of what Kyle is trying to emphasize on that play, and then relay it to the rest of the offense and break the huddle and go. We’ve been doing that I think pretty much since day one is using that coach-to-quarterback communication.”