Giants' World Series Memorabilia to Hall of Fame

Giants' World Series Memorabilia to Hall of Fame

Nov. 19, 2010GIANTS PAGE GIANTS VIDEOGIANTS WORLD SERIES PAGE

COOPERSTOWN, NY As the San Francisco Giants celebrate their first World Series championship, treasures from the baseballs most memorable moments from the 2010 postseason are now on display in the Autumn Glory exhibit at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown.

Following the Giants World Series-clinching win on Nov. 1, the Museum acquired nearly a dozen artifacts from the both the Giants and the Texas Rangers. Artifacts donated by the Giants from the 106th World Series include:

- Road jersey worn by Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum in Game 5; Lincecum won two games in the Fall Classic.

- Bat used by World Series Most Valuable Player Edgar Renteria to hit his game-winning home run in Game 5.

- World Series batting helmet worn by Cody Ross, who scored five runs in the World Series.

- Cap worn by Madison Bumgarner in Game 4 when the rookie pitched eight shutout innings.

- Cap worn by Matt Cain in Game 2; Cain allowed no earned runs in 21.1 postseason innings this year.

- Left spike worn by Aubrey Huff in the Series; Huff drove in eight runs in the 2010 postseason.

- Catchers mask and spikes worn by Buster Posey throughout the Series; Posey hit .300 in the Fall Classic.

- Press pin from the World Series.

Additional items from the Giants World Series title may be added to the exhibit in the coming weeks. In addition to these treasures, the exhibit also features artifacts from the American League champions Rangers from the 2010 World Series postseason, including:

- Bat used by the Rangers Mitch Moreland to hit his Game 3 home run, the first World Series round-tripper in Rangers history.

- Ceremonial first pitch ball from Game 4, delivered by former President George W. Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, signed by both men.

- Dirt taken from around the pitching mound following Game 3 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington to mark the first World Series game in North Texas history.

The 2010 World Series exhibit in Autumn Glory will be on display through the 2011 Major League Baseball postseason. Entrance to the Autumn Glory exhibit is included with Museum admission.

The Museum collections contain many artifacts documenting the entire history of World Series and postseason play, including Don Larsens cap and Yogi Berras mitt from Larsens 1956 perfect game; Bill Mazeroskis (1960) and Joe Carters (1993) bats from their Series-ending blasts; and World Series rings from the last century of Fall Classic competition.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is open seven days a week year round, with the exception of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day. The Museum observes regular hours of 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. from Labor Day until Memorial Day Weekend. From Memorial Day through the day before Labor Day, the Museum is open from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. Ticket prices are 16.50 for adults (13 and over), 11 for seniors (65 and over) and for those holding current memberships in the VFW, Disabled American Veterans, American Legion and AMVets organizations, and 6 for juniors (ages 7-12). Members are always admitted free of charge and there is no charge for children 6 years of age or younger. For more information, visit our Web site at baseballhall.org or call 888-HALL-OF-FAME (888-425-5633) or 607-547-7200.

Courtesy National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum media services.

Giants top prospect Beede scratched from Triple-A start

Giants top prospect Beede scratched from Triple-A start

Tyler Beede was supposed to start Sacramento's matinee tilt on Monday in Tacoma, but he was scratched.

But not for the reason Giants fans have been hoping for. The top pitching prospect hasn't been called up.

The 24-year-old Beede was scratched after he strained his groin while warming up for the start.

Kraig Sitton started in Beede's place.

In 19 starts with the River Cats this season, Beede has a 4.79 ERA and 83 strikeouts in 109 innings pitched.

Beede, the 2014 1st round pick out of Vanderbilt, entered the season as the No. 89 prospect in all of baseball according to Baseball America, but fell out of the Top 100 in the Midseason update. The publication also had Beede as the Giants' No. 1 prospect in the preseason, but dropped him to No. 3 behind Chris Shaw and Christian Arroyo in the Midseason update.

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Brandon Crawford: Giants should change right-center field wall

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AP

Brandon Crawford: Giants should change right-center field wall

Since the moment it opened, AT&T Park has been a pitcher's park.

Last Friday, Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford answered questions from kids at a youth baseball camp.

How big are Major League fields?

“They vary in size. Ours is one of the bigger ones, 421 feet to right-center, which should be changed," Crawford said.

Baseball fans are well aware that flyballs to deep right-center field in San Francisco -- home runs in the majority of ballparks -- are routinely caught or result in triples.

This season, there have been 69 home runs hit at AT&T Park -- by far the lowest in baseball.

Fenway Park in Boston (82) and PETCO Park in San Diego (89) are next.

Crawford has eight home runs this year -- six on the road and two at home.

Last year, he hit 12 home runs -- eight on the road and four at home.

In 2015, he hit a career-high 21 home runs -- 13 on the road and eight at home.

Might the Giants somehow move the fences in?

"It ain't gonna happen ... that's just not gonna happen," Mike Krukow said on KNBR 680 on Monday morning.