Baggs' Instant Replay: Giants 15, Cardinals 0

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Baggs' Instant Replay: Giants 15, Cardinals 0

BOX SCORE

ST. LOUIS Reputations can be made in a flash. It takes a little longer to unmake them.

Ryan Vogelsong might forever pitch with a chip on his shoulder, aware that, in his own words, nobody takes (him) seriously. And the Giants offense has been negligible for so long, GM Brian Sabean probably hears screams of get a bat in his REM cycles.

But the league will have to pay attention to reality at some point.

Vogelsong, an All-Star snub and the NLs ERA leader, certainly held the St. Louis Cardinals spellbound while limiting one of baseballs most productive lineups to three hits in seven shutout innings Wednesday night.

As for the Giants offense? Well, they practically shouted a 15-0 victory inside library-quiet Busch Stadium.

Buster Posey extended his hitting streak to 11 games, Melky Cabrera continued to add to his major league leading hits and runs totals and Hunter Pence had a pair of run-scoring hits.

That was mere prelude to some serious stat padding in the final four innings. Marco Scutaro hit a two-run double in the eighth and a grand slam in the ninth to complete a seven-RBI game the most by a Giant since Jeff Kent knocked in seven runs May 1, 2001, at Pittsburgh.

Hard to believe, but the Giants are the highest scoring road team in the major leagues, with 5.18 runs per game.

And while were on the subject of shedding reputations, shortstop Brandon Crawford made an acrobatic, run-saving play in the hole to end the fourth inning. After committing 12 errors and causing much consternation in his first 61 games, the gifted shortstop has made just one in his last 39.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, the Giants achieved their largest margin of victory in a shutout at St. Louis. It bested an 11-0 victory on June 27, 1894. Thats when the Cardinals were called the St. Louis Browns, and Adolphus Buschs fledgling brewery was just getting started.

Starting pitching report

Vogelsong (10-5) just keeps on grinding out quality starts.

He has tossed at least 6.0 innings in each of his 21 starts this season the longest streak by a Giant since Bill Swift compiled 24 consecutive in 1993. The San Francisco-era record is 29, set by Juan Marichal in 1968.

The right-hander only struck out three, but he found a way to keep the ball off the barrel. Hes done that so well all season while compiling a 2.27 ERA second only to the Angels Jered Weaver (2.13) among qualified major league starters.

Vogelsong matched Washingtons Jordan Zimmermann for the NL lead with his 19th quality start.

Bullpen report

Well, the Giants did better than the Cardinals bullpen.

Jose Mijares made his Giants debut in the most low-pressure spot imaginable. He pitched around a single and a walk in the ninth inning. He did not receive credit for a save.

At the plate

Cabrera recorded his 51st multi-hit game and bumped his major league leading hits total to 154. With the help of Pence, Cabrera also boosted his NL-best runs total to 80.

Pences seeing-eye single in the first inning scored Cabrera to put the Giants on the board. It marked the seventh consecutive road game in which the Giants scored in the first inning; the last team with a longer streak was the 2006 Mets, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

Cabreras double kick-started a five-run rally in the sixth inning that broke open a 2-0 game. Buster Posey, whod already extended his hitting streak to 12 games with a first-inning single, drew a pitch-around walk. Pence followed up by doing exactly what the Giants hoped he could, ripping an RBI single that scored Cabrera.

After Brandon Belt singled to load the bases, Ryan Theriot hit a grounder to second base that got past Tyler Greene for an error that allowed two runs to score. Angel Pagan tacked on a sacrifice fly to complete the rally.

The Giants batted around again in the eighth, with Scutaros double driving in two of the four runs. Scutaros third career grand slam in the ninth was the foie gras on top of the 20-ounce steak. He smashed his previous high for RBIs, which was four.

In field

Remember when Crawford committed 12 errors in his first 61 games? Well, thats not a topic any longer. The gifted shortstop has committed just one error over his last 39 games, and he made a run-saving stop in the fourth inning.

With runners at the corners and two outs, Crawford made a diving stop of David Freeses hard ground ball. From the lip of the outfield grass, he sprang to his feet and made a strong throw to first base to end the inning.

The Cardinals made their biggest flub on Greenes error in the sixth, but pitcher Joe Kelly also threw away a pickoff throw in the third inning that allowed Pagan to advance two bases. He scored on Scutaros single.

Attendance

The Cardinals announced 36,906 paid. Were guessing Buschs heirs were able to pocket some coppers from the thirsty crowd.

Up next

The Giants try to make it three out of four in St. Louis and a banner, 6-1 trip when they conclude their series against the Cardinals Thursday afternoon at Busch Stadium. Left-hander Madison Bumgarner (12-6, 3.03) opposes right-hander Adam Wainwright. (9-10, 4.03).

Pros and cons: Should Giants seriously pursue Andrew McCutchen?

Pros and cons: Should Giants seriously pursue Andrew McCutchen?

SAN FRANCISCO — The Giants and Pirates nearly pulled off a trade in July when Bobby Evans sought a closer and zeroed in on Mark Melancon. Ultimately, Pirates GM Neil Huntington shipped Melancon to Washington D.C., but the two teams could be connected again as the winter meetings approach. 

Pittsburgh’s star outfielder, Andrew McCutchen, is reportedly available — very available. According to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Huntington and the Pirates are calling potential suitors, with the Nationals, Rangers and Mariners listed as teams that have discussed a McCutchen deal. 

At first glance, it’s remarkable that this point has even been reached. This is nearly the equivalent of the Giants putting Buster Posey on the market. McCutchen, drafted 11th overall in 2005, has spent the better part of a decade as the face of a franchise that has gone from the cellar to perennial contention. He’s a a five-time All-Star and won the National League’s MVP award in 2014.  

McCutchen has helped revitalize the Pirates, but they’re still the Pirates, and they’re still constrained by a strict budget. Pittsburgh has two outfield building blocks in Starling Marte and Gregory Polanco, with prospect Austin Meadows on the way. They reportedly are set on moving McCutchen.

It’s not a question of if Evans will end up on the other end of one of those phone calls. The Giants always do their due diligence, and they could use help in the outfield. The question is should the Giants seriously pursue McCutchen, and if they do, can they actually get him? Here are the pros and cons … 

Pro: I mean, he’s Andrew McCutchen. Even with a “down year” in 2016, he leads all NL players in WAR (28.6 per FanGraphs) over the past five seasons. He’s a .292 career hitter with a .381 on-base percentage and six consecutive 20-homer seasons. McCutchen’s OPS dropped more than 100 points last season, but he still hit 24 homers, seven more than any Giant. In theory, McCutchen would add a very dangerous right-handed bat to a team that’s ready to win now. 

Con: Is he still THAT version of Andrew McCutchen? The drop off in 2016 was steep in certain respects. McCutchen’s .336 OBP was a career-low by nearly 30 points. His slugging percentage has dipped more than 100 points over the past two seasons. He stole just six bases in 13 attempts. Most concerning: McCutchen’s fielding metrics fell off a cliff. The former Gold Glove winner was worth negative 28 defensive runs saved per FanGraphs. By comparison, Angel Pagan posted a negative 20 in 2015 and got moved to left. The Giants could acquire McCutchen to play left, but it’s unclear how he would react to switching positions given that every defensive inning of his career has been spent in center. Was 2016 a fluke or the beginning of a slide? 

Pro: Let’s say he is amendable to moving … McCutchen would balance a lineup that leans to the left, and there’s no reason to think he wouldn’t be an above average defender in left field. He has one guaranteed year left on his deal at a very affordable $14 million, with a $14.5 million club option for 2018. The front office could basically sit back for two years, as every starting position player but Eduardo Nunez would be under team control through the 2018 season. 

Con: The fit is an imperfect one in a number of ways. Let’s start with what it would take to actually get McCutchen. The Giants didn't offer enough to get Melancon, and a McCutchen deal would surely center around top prospects Christian Arroyo or Tyler Beede, plus other players. Joe Panik’s name might come up, too. The Pirates are reportedly asking the Nationals for minor league outfielder Victor Robles, who is a better prospect than any player the Giants have. So any potential deal would clean out a system that’s thin after trades for Nunez, Will Smith and Matt Moore. 

The financial cost is not insignificant. The Giants don’t have that much wiggle room in their budget, and a new closer will be expensive. Add a $14 million hitter and you’re looking at about $45 million for an outfield made up of three players on the wrong side of 30. For months, the Giants have signaled that they’re more comfortable giving the open playing time to young players like Mac Williamson and Jarrett Parker, who would be hopelessly blocked by a trade for McCutchen. 

Conclusion: If a trade does happen, it will be a crushing blow to Pirates fans. To save some face, the organization will need to get an elite player or two in return, and as always in these situations, other teams have much more to offer than the Giants. Robles, for instance, was the No. 33 prospect in the minors last season, per Baseball America. 

Even if the Giants are interested, they won’t win a bidding war. But they don’t have to. The focus has been on fixing the ninth inning, not left field, and the guess here is that it remains that way. 
 

MLB, union beat deadline, agree to tentative new CBA

MLB, union beat deadline, agree to tentative new CBA

IRVING, Texas -- Baseball players and owners reached a tentative agreement on a five-year labor contract Wednesday night, a deal that will extend the sport's industrial peace to 26 years since the ruinous fights in the first two decades of free agency.

After days of near round-the-clock talks, negotiators reached a verbal agreement about 3 1/2 hours before the expiration of the current pact. Then they worked to draft a memorandum of understanding, which must be ratified by both sides.

"It's great! Another five years of uninterrupted baseball," Oakland catcher Stephen Vogt said in a text message.

In announcing the agreement, Major League Baseball said it will make specific terms available when drafting is complete.

"Happy it's done, and baseball is back on," Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Brandon McCarthy said.

As part of the deal, the luxury tax threshold rises from $189 million to $195 million next year, $197 million in 2018, $206 million in 2019, $209 million in 2020 and $210 million in 2021, a person familiar with the agreement told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal had not yet been signed.

Tax rates increase from 17.5 percent to 20 percent for first offenders, remain at 30 percent for second offenders and rise from 40 percent to 50 percent for third offenders. There is a new surtax of 12 percent for teams $20 million to $40 million above the threshold, 42.5 percent for first offenders more than $40 million above the threshold and 45 percent for subsequent offenders more than $40 million above.

A player can receive a free-agent qualifying offer only once in his career and will have 10 days to consider it instead of seven. A club signing a player who failed to accept a qualifying offer would lose its third-highest amateur draft pick if it is a revenue-sharing receiver, its second- and fifth-highest picks (plus a loss of $1 million in its international draft pool) if it pays luxury tax for the just-ended season, and its second-highest pick (plus $500,000 in the international draft pool) if it is any other team.

A club losing a free agent who declined a qualifying offer would receive an extra selection after the first round of the next draft if the player signed a contract for $50 million or more and after the competitive balance B round if under $50 million. However, if that team pays luxury tax, the extra draft pick would drop to after the fourth round.

Among other details:

-For a team $40 million or more in excess of the luxury tax threshold, its highest selection in the next amateur draft will drop 10 places.

-While management failed to obtain an international draft of amateurs residing outside the U.S., Puerto Rico and Canada, it did get a hard cap on each team's annual bonus pool for those players starting at $4.75 million for the signing period that starts next July 2.

-There is no change to limits on active rosters, which remain at 25 for most of the season and 40 from Sept. 1 on.

-Smokeless tobacco will be banned for all players who currently do not have at least one day of major league service.

-The regular season will expand from 183 days to 187 starting in 2018, creating four more scheduled off days. There are additional limitations on the start time of night games on getaway days.

-The minimum salary rises from $507,500 to $535,000 next year, $545,000 in 2018 and $555,000 in 2019, with cost-of-living increases the following two years; the minor league minimum for a player appearing on the 40-man roster for at least the second time goes up from $82,700 to $86,500 next year, $88,000 in 2018 and $89,500 in 2019, followed by cost-of-living raises.

-The drop-off in slot values in the first round of the amateur draft will be lessened.

-Oakland's revenue-sharing funds will be cut to 75 percent next year, 50 percent in 2018, 25 percent in 2019 and then phases out.

-As part of the drug agreement, there will be increased testing, players will not be credited with major league service time during suspensions, and biomarker testing for HGH will begin next year.

Negotiators met through most of Tuesday night in an effort to increase momentum in the talks, which began during spring training. This is the third straight time the sides reached a new agreement before expiration, but a deal was struck eight weeks in advance of expiration in 2006 and three weeks ahead of expiration in 2011.

Talks took place at a hotel outside Dallas where the players' association held its annual executive board meeting.

Tony Clark, the first former player to serve as executive director of the union, and others set up in a meeting room within earshot of a children's choir practicing Christmas carols. A man dressed as Santa Claus waited nearby.

Baseball had eight work stoppages from 1972-95, the last a 7 1/2-month strike in 1994-95 that led to the first cancellation of the World Series in 90 years. The 2002 agreement was reached after players authorized a strike and about 3 1/2 hours before the first game that would have been impacted by a walkout.

The peace in baseball is in contrast to the recent labor histories of other major sports. The NFL had a preseason lockout in 2011, the NBA lost 240 games to a lockout that same year and the NHL lost 510 games to a lockout in 2012-13.