Ex-landlord sues Giants' Lincecum for damages

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Ex-landlord sues Giants' Lincecum for damages

SAN FRANCISCO -- The former landlord for Giants ace Tim Lincecum has filed a lawsuit against the pitcher seeking 350,000 in damages, claiming the two-time NL Cy Young Award winner stole and destroyed items in the San Francisco apartment he rented.The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in San Francisco Superior Court by Mindy Freile. She alleges that after Lincecum's lease expired, he returned to living in the unit and "broke, stained, defaced, tore, injured or destroyed" her property.Lincecum signed a lease in May 2010 to rent the Mission District apartment, according to court documents. The lawsuit alleges that shortly after the lease expired on Feb. 28, Lincecum occupied the unit without his landlord's permission and stayed through May 13.

Freile, who said she had been trying to evict Lincecum, later entered the unit and found the damages. The landlord wrote in the complaint that Lincecum also failed to pay rent on time and stole and destroyed household properties such as "bedding, doors, carpet, pillows, kitchenware, linens, furniture, household appliances, art work, decorations, patio furniture, lights, lamps, and mirrors."She is seeking 200,000 in property damage and an additional 150,000 in time and money lost. A case management conference is scheduled for March 9 in San Francisco.A text message to Lincecum seeking comment wasn't immediately returned Thursday night. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter said the team had no comment.Lincecum, known as "The Freak" for his funky delivery and quirky personality, pitched San Francisco to an improbable title last fall capped off by his Game 5 performance in the World Series at Texas. The victory gave the franchise its first World Series championship since moving to San Francisco in 1958 and first since the New York Giants won in 1954.Lincecum received a 23 million, two-year contract in February 2010 before spring training and ahead of a scheduled arbitration hearing. At the time, the two-time reigning NL Cy Young Award winner had been set to ask for an arbitration-record 13 million salary for 2010 during a hearing in St. Petersburg, Fla.Lincecum might be searching for another deal soon.The 27-year-old had a 2.74 ERA this season but had little run support, finishing with a 13-14 record. General manager Brian Sabean said last week, when San Francisco missed the playoffs, that keeping his club's pitching staff intact for the long haul was among his top priorities this winter.

Why you shouldn't freak out in June about Cueto's opt-out

Why you shouldn't freak out in June about Cueto's opt-out

SAN FRANCISCO — There’s a very important fact you need to keep in mind when talk of Johnny Cueto’s opt-out comes up, as it so often will over the next six weeks: The Giants always expected him to opt-out after this season, from the moment the ink was dry on the six-year, $130-million contract. 

When you sign at the top of your game and have a chance to hit the market at 31 years old and cash out a second time, you take it. Those are just the rules of professional sports. On the day Cueto was introduced, his agent, Bryce Dixon, said the two-year opt-out was important because they felt Cueto didn’t get a totally fair shot at free agency. 

“Johnny, a little bit unfairly, had a lot of questions about his arm,” Dixon said in December of 2015. “I felt we could reestablish his actual value … He knows he’s as good as (David) Price and (Zack) Greinke, but his situation was a little different.”

The Giants were fine with this, too. The flip side of the opt-out is that if you have the chance to pay a dominant right-hander $46 million over two years, and then escape his mid- to late-thirties, you do it. Every time. You don’t even blink. 

So, here we are, in June of the second year of that deal, with reports that Cueto will opt out. You should take a deep breath because you should have already expected this. But if you didn’t, take comfort in this: By all indications, Cueto has not made a decision, even with the Giants having an unimaginably poor season. 

First of all, Cueto can't make a decision in June. What if the blisters return and he repeats his April ERA a couple more times? What if his elbow starts barking? There are no guarantees with pitchers, and until Cueto gets through the second season, there will be no finality with his decision. 

Aside from the fact that he really can’t make that decision, though, sources insist Cueto hasn’t made up his mind or even thought much about it. People familiar with his thinking continue to say the focus has been baseball all season long, from spring training through his last start. 

Cueto is said to be happy in San Francisco and he enjoys pitching in front of the crowd at AT&T Park. His biggest concern has been wins and losses, and in that respect, this has been a disappointing year for all involved. 

That record has brought the Giants to a crossroads, and this is where it gets interesting. The easy solution is to trade Cueto next month, avoid the opt-out situation entirely, and add prospects to a system lacking them. But, it’s complicated. The Giants do not intend a full teardown, and if they’re going for it again in 2018 — with their core of Buster Posey, Brandon Crawford, Madison Bumgarner, etc. locked in, that’s the plan — they’ll want that second ace at the top of the rotation. And if Bumgarner doesn’t return to form after an injury, they’ll need Cueto’s presence. 

The Giants have until July 31 to decide what to do with Cueto. He has until three days after the World Series ends to decide what to do with his contract. Here in June, by all indications, those decisions haven’t been made. 

Giants lineup: Pence hitting third, Panik back into two-hole

Giants lineup: Pence hitting third, Panik back into two-hole

Clutch, late-game hitting by Hunter Pence has propelled him to the three hole as the Giants look to bounce back vs the Braves. Bruce Bochy has released the rest of his lineup for Game 2 of the series...

San Francisco Giants:
1. Kelby Tomlinson (R) 3B
2. Joe Panik (L) 2B
3. Hunter Pence (R) RF
4. Buster Posey (R) 1B
5. Austin Slater (R) LF
6. Brandon Crawford (L) SS
7. Nick Hundley (R) C
8. Gorkys Hernandez (R) CF
9. Matt Cain (R) P

Atlanta Braves:
1. Ender Inciarte (L) CF
2. Brandon Phillips (R) 2B
3. Nick Markakis (L) RF
4. Matt Kemp (R) LF
5. Matt Adams (L) 1B
6. Kurt Suzuki (R) C
7. Dansby Swanson (R) SS
8. Johan Camargo (S) 3B
9. Jaime Garcia (L) P