Giants' failures leave Bochy frustrated

pence-hunter-giants-white-night-mets-catcher.jpg

Giants' failures leave Bochy frustrated

Rael Enteen
CSNBayArea.com staff writer 

SAN FRANCISCO – Brandon Crawford’s glove giveth, and Brandon Crawford’s glove taketh away.

The Giants and their fans have been blessed to witness the amazing feats Crawford performs with the leather on a daily basis. Monday’s game was no difference, as San Francisco’s shortstop maintained a tie thanks to a diving backhand stop and strong throw with the potential go-ahead run at third base in the 11th inning. But the Giants’ offense didn’t do enough to end the game in time for Crawford to avoid a costly error that led to the New York Mets’ game-winning run in the 16th inning.

[INSTANT REPLAY: Giants fall in 16 innings

“He made that one play to save us,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “He’s so good over there, he just didn’t come up with it.”

“These things happen,” Hunter Pence said. “He makes it look a lot easier than it is. It’s going to happen every now and then and it just happened to come about at a bad time like that.”

It couldn’t have come at a worse time for the Giants, who have lost six of their last seven games and 12 of their last 14 to fall to 40-48.

But while Crawford’s error will be the lasting memory of a five hour and 26 minute marathon game, his game-saving play in the 11th would’ve lingered longer if not for the Giants’ woes with runners in scoring position.

Brandon Belt, batting in the three-hole in Bruce Bochy’s lineup for the first time in his career, is an easy target (0-for-8 with five strikeouts) but it’s truly a team-wide failure.

The Giants left 13 runners on base in extra innings and 18 total, the most since June 6, 1998, and finished 1-for-15 with runners in scoring position, giving them three hits in their last 51 at-bats in such situations.

“That’s as frustrating a game as we’ve had,” Bochy said. “I think it’s caught up to all of us. We had so many chances and just couldn’t get a hit.”

Even after Crawford’s error gave the Mets a 4-3 lead, the Giants had an opportunity in the bottom half of the 16th, an inning that serves as a solid representation for San Francisco’s struggles of late. Mets closer Bobby Parnell gifted the Giants a leadoff baserunner when he walked Marco Scutaro, but Belt couldn’t even make a productive out, striking out on a foul tip. After Buster Posey picked Belt up with a sharp single up the middle for his career-best fifth hit of the evening, Pablo Sandoval struck out swinging on a pitch out of the zone, leaving him with just four hits in his last 48 at-bats. The game ended one pitch later when pinch-hitter Guillermo Quiroz rolled over a Parnell curveball to strand Scutaro at second.

“We had a lot of runners on, we just couldn’t get the final big hit,” Pence said. “There’s frustration. We want to stay as positive as we can, but we gotta get it done. We’ve got to keep pushing to find a way to turn it around.”

Pence, who snapped a career-long 0-for-24 slump with a seventh-inning triple and almost ended the game with an opposite field line drive in the 10th that required a running catch from Mets rightfielder Marlon Byrd, owned up to his own issues with situational hitting.

“Me personally, I haven’t gotten much done with runners in scoring position,” Pence said. “Part of it is maybe being too aggressive, trying to do too much. But there in the 10th, I hit a ball hard, just right at them. So it’s tough when it’s going like this.”

Bochy now has to go back to the drawing board to decide how to jumpstart a team that looks less and less like the defending World Series champions. It will not be an easy task Tuesday, as Bochy said he would have to rest Posey, who caught all 16 innings, and likely keep Belt in the No. 3 spot, despite the first baseman becoming the first Giant to go hitless in eight at-bats since Jose Uribe on June 11, 1985.

The Giants’ inability to get consistent offensive production from anyone not named Buster Posey overshadowed Tim Lincecum's start, which by game’s end felt as ancient as his long hair and Cy Young Awards.

Lincecum struck out a season-high 11 and was done in by some shoddy defense in the sixth, the inning that he has most frequently failed to post zeroes in. After the Mets scored twice in the sixth, Lincecum owns an 8.44 ERA and .429 opponents batting average in the fateful frame.

“Timmy threw well, we just had a tough time making a play there in the sixth inning and let them take the lead there,” Bochy said.

George Kontos, who took the loss after being charged with an unearned run due to Crawford’s error, was impressed with what he saw from Lincecum.

[RELATED: Giants notes -- Bochy's sense of urgency, Belt's opportunity]

“He came out and looked like he had a really good tempo going,” Kontos said. “He was locating everything, throwing that nice slow breaking ball. He looked really good. That’s definitely one of the big positives from the game is him looking like his old self.”

The other positive is what Kontos and the bullpen did for Bochy, despite the eventual outcome.

“One unearned run in nine innings is pretty good,” Kontos said. “It’s definitely a positive. Anything we can take away right now in the skid we’re going through. You just gotta look at the positives. You can’t really focus on the stuff that’s not going right. We’re a much better ballclub than the last 10-to-12 games that we’ve played. I definitely think just keeping our heads down, playing the game the right way and doing the things that we’ve been doing, we’ll come out of it.”

There’s nothing wrong with Kontos’ optimism, but it came just eight hours after Bochy’s pregame proclamation that certainly bears repeating:

“At some point, you have to turn it around and get clicking as a club.”

It didn’t happen Monday night, or even Tuesday morning, but part of the beauty of baseball is the prospect of a new game tomorrow. Or in this case, today.

After tumultuous 2016, Peavy making kids, not baseball, top priority

After tumultuous 2016, Peavy making kids, not baseball, top priority

The 2016 calendar year was one to forget for former Giants pitcher Jake Peavy.

Before the 2016 season even started, it was revealed that Peavy lost millions in a ponzi scheme.

During the season, the 35-year-old Peavy battled through injuries and posted a 5.54 ERA in 31 appearances for San Francisco.

And then following the season, his wife of 15 years, Katie, filed for divorce.

That, in part, explains why the Alabama-native has yet to sign a contract for the 2017 season.

While the legal matters are being handled, Peavy is taking care of his four sons and has made them his top priority.

Baseball is taking a backseat.

"It hurts not to be in spring training. I know that day is coming, but right now being a dad is absolutely No. 1. There's no way in a million years that I could leave my boys at this time," Peavy told ESPN this week.

Peavy explained in depth how the ponzi scheme affected his life during the past year.

"It turned my whole world upside-down. For the first time ever, it was hard to give my 150 percent focus, time and energy to baseball. It was such a tough year, because everything I have built and played for was jeopardized to some degree. When you've known people your whole life and career and they let you down and they're not who you thought you were, it's devastating.

"It turned me into a person I never wanted to be. People would text me and I'd say, 'What does this person want from me? What's their motive?' I had numerous relationships for 10-15 years with people who let me and my family down in a huge way. You put the blame on yourself in these situations, but I can't even tell you the mindset I was in from the start of spring training through the season," Peavy said.

Peavy also addressed his divorce.

"I'm not shying away from getting divorced. It's not something I'm proud of or something I wanted or asked for, but it happened and I'm dealing with that. But I also have four boys I'm responsible for in life, and I just feel deep down that it's in my best interests and my family's interests to be there through this time," Peavy said.

And while spring training games are underway, Peavy sounds as if he expects to sign with a team eventually. Once he does, he plans to give the team everything he's got.

"When I sign with a team, I'm all in. For me to leave right now with so much uncertainty in my life, it wouldn't be fair to an organization and it wouldn't be the right thing to do as far as being a dad," Peavy said.

In mid-December, Peavy was reportedly linked to the Padres, the team that drafted him in 1999.

 

Bumgarner allows two runs, Giants start spring training with walk-off homer

Bumgarner allows two runs, Giants start spring training with walk-off homer

BOX SCORE

At Scottsdale, Arizona, Chris Marrero hit a three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth and drove in four runs as the Giants rallied after Madison Bumgarner gave up two runs on two hits in the top of the first.

Marrero, a 2006 first-round draft pick of the Nationals trying to revive his career as a non-roster invitee, had an RBI single in the fifth.

Kevin Shackelford, the seventh Cincinnati pitcher, walked Orlando Calixte to open the ninth and Christian Arroyo blooped a single into left field before Marrero hit a line drive over the wall in left centerfield.

Patrick Kivlehan had a two-run single off Bumgarner in the first and Hunter Pence doubled in a run off Reds starter Rookie Davis. Davis, acquired from the Yankees in the Aroldis Chapman deal, is likely to open with Double-A Pensacola this year.