Giants pick up 2014 options, plan to further extend Bochy, Sabean

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Giants pick up 2014 options, plan to further extend Bochy, Sabean

NASHVILLE – In a decision plucked straight out of what Giants CEO Larry Baer called “no-brainer land,” the club formally exercised its 2014 contract options on manager Bruce Bochy and GM Brian Sabean.

Baer acknowledged the move was made official a week ago, and added that the parties absolutely would engage in talks about an extension “for 2015 and beyond” some time during the coming year.

“I'm thrilled," Bochy said. "This is what I love to do, and I couldn't be in a better place. With Brian giving me the tools to do what we’ve done these last three years, this appetite only grows.”

Baer called the coach/general manager relationship “the most key in sports – any sport. And so we are very fortunate in that regard.”

“One of the hallmarks of the Giants and a chief reason for their success is their stability together and the working relationship they have,” Baer said. “It’s hand-in-glove connectivity in making decisions and results, I think, speak for themselves.”

Two World Series titles in three seasons tends to do that.

Sabean, who was named Baseball America’s Executive of the Year on Tuesday, is entering his 17th season as the Giants’ head of baseball operations – the longest tenured GM in the major leagues with one club. It’s a high-pressure position that typically has a short half-life and leads to chronic burnout. But Baer said he sees the same fire and hunger in the silver-haired 56-year-old former Yankees scouting director as he did nearly two decades ago.

“He’s surrounded himself with the right people,” Baer said of Sabean, who replaced Bob Quinn after the 1996 season. “Our scouts are really good and we’ve built a homegrown pitching staff with the exception of Barry Zito, which is really hard to do. That doesn’t happen by accident.

“He’s got a solid information base and he commands loyalty from his group. As I’ve become more involved, it’s been gratifying to see how smooth functioning it is.”

Said Bochy: “Brian, I think, is the best GM in the game. He’s passionate about the game, he’s fiery and he cares about the players. He cares about the fans and about winning.

“He’s not just my boss. He’s a good friend and we spend a lot of time together talking about the team and the ways we can win.”

Sabean has heaped just as much praise on Bochy, calling him a shoo-in Hall of Fame manager following the Giants’ sweep over the Detroit Tigers in the World Series. Both Baer and Sabean have called the hiring of Bochy following the 2006 season as perhaps the organization’s best decision in the last two decades.

“He’s just so good and so easy to work with,” Baer said. “You respect the thought process and the way the wheels move, which isn’t something you necessarily see when you meet him. That’s because he’s low on ego and high on aptitude. That’s not a combination you get very often, especially in sports.”

Add desire.

Bochy, 57, is entering his seventh season with the Giants and his 19th as a major league manager. Now one of the game’s elder statesmen on the bench, he said he hopes to continue managing for a long time – especially if he is able to continue to work with Sabean.

Sabean is not at baseball’s winter meetings at the Opryland Resort because of a sinus issue; his doctor advised him to stay home. He continues to do business by phone and text, though, and sent a message of gratitude when informed of the Baseball America award.

Bochy has won six NL West titles in his 18 seasons. The Giants have made the playoffs in seven of Sabean’s 17 seasons as GM, winning three NL pennants and two confetti-strewn trips down Market Street.

Giants get blanked by Braves, now have lowest-scoring team in majors

Giants get blanked by Braves, now have lowest-scoring team in majors

SAN FRANCISCO — Over in Cleveland earlier Friday, Brandon Moss hit a three-run homer for the visiting team and five other players chipped in a pair of hits. The Royals had six runs, which meant that when Jim Johnson closed the Giants out a few hours later, what has seemed true all season became officially true. The Giants have the lowest-scoring lineup in the majors.

At 3.32 runs per game, they have dipped below the equally-disappointing Royals (3.38). They are capable at the moment of making any pitching staff look dominant. A 2-0 shutout was the first of the year for the Braves, who previously had just two games this season where they allowed fewer than two runs. 

“Six runs in (the last) four games … I thought we would come home and get some rips in tonight, but it didn’t happen,” Bruce Bochy said. 

The manager’s frustration showed late in this one. After the only rally of the game — a two-run single by opposing pitcher Jaime Garcia — Bochy took his cap off and rubbed his forehead. He dipped his head and briefly stood as if he was going to fall asleep on the rail. The bats were equally still. 

The Giants had just four hits, all of them singles against Garcia, who is a nice pitcher but hardly one of the league’s best. One was an infield single by Eduardo Nuñez, another a single through Garcia’s five-hole, and a third a generous ruling by the official scorekeeper. 

“It comes down to, you’ve got to get some hits and create opportunities, and we’re not doing it very often,” Bochy said. “It’s just a matter of guys getting somewhat hot. We did, we had some success, and we won some games. The thing you like to see is some good cuts and I didn’t think we got enough of those tonight.”

That run, which spanned the last homestand and small parts of two road trips, has come to a screeching halt. The Giants have lost five of six. It seems silly to scoreboard-watch in May, especially when a team is playing like this, but it’s worth noting that the teams the Giants eventually need to catch keep winning. They fell 12 games back of the Rockies and 11 back of the streaking Diamondbacks. They are 9 1/2 back of the Dodgers, who might be the best team in the whole league. 

Matt Cain did his part to allow the Giants to keep pace. He got beat just once in seven sharp innings. The Giants intentionally walked Dansby Swanson to get to Garcia, who bounced a single into left. Brandon Belt had a play at the plate, but his throw was short and hit the runner. A second run scored. 

“That’s tough,” Cain said. “(Garcia) was throwing the ball really good and that’s what it comes down to, you’re looking for that one hit and he did it. He’s a good hitter. We’ve seen it in St. Louis. But it definitely is tough when the pitcher does that … it just stinks on my part to give up a hit to the opposing pitcher.”

Instant Analysis: Giants bats silenced, losing streak now at four games

Instant Analysis: Giants bats silenced, losing streak now at four games

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO — The return to AT&T Park was a huge boost to Matt Cain, who has wild home-road splits this season, but it did predictable things to an already-limp Giants offense. 

The Giants entered the night as the lowest-scoring team in the National League and they got blanked 2-0 by Jaime Garcia and the Braves. Garcia out-dueled Cain and provided the only offense of the night, as well. The Giants have dropped five of six.

Here are five things to know from AT&T Park, where they keep having Star Wars Night but they’ve never once celebrated Super Troopers … 

--- Cain entered the seventh with a 0.94 ERA at home this season, but the opposing pitcher busted him. With one on and two outs, the Giants intentionally walked Dansby Swanson to get to Garcia, a career .145 hitter. He bounced a single into shallow left and it looked like Brandon Belt had a play at the plate, but his throw home hit the runner. That allowed Swanson to race home for a 2-0 lead. 

--- Cain’s final line: seven innings, one earned run, one walk, three strikeouts. Yep, that’s a Caining.

--- Justin Ruggiano is here for the opportunity he was given in the sixth. Ruggiano has always crushed lefties, and Bruce Bochy put him behind Buster Posey on Friday night. The Braves intentionally walked Posey to load the bases for Ruggiano, who grounded out to third. Even the platoon splits are failing the Giants. 

--- If you need a little perspective on Christian Arroyo’s struggles, look across the field. Swanson, the former No. 1 overall pick, is batting .198. The shortstop slashed .302/.361/.442 as a rookie but his numbers are way down across the board, and he’s nearly two years older than Arroyo. These things take time. Having said that, Arroyo’s hole is pretty deep. He’s hitless in his last 21 at-bats after an 0 for 3.

--- There were three no-pitch intentional walks. I hope you used the extra ninety seconds wisely.