Giants

Giants' reunion weekend forcing focus on future

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Giants' reunion weekend forcing focus on future

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Heres how much history matters to Dusty Baker: When asked after Saturdays 2-1 Cincinnati victory over the Giants whether he would be participating in Sundays 10-year fete for the 02 World Series team, he said, and you should clip and save this for future notation:

I guess Im supposed to. The sent me a notice. But right now, Im going fishing out in the Bay.

And heres how much history matters to Mat Latos: When asked how to explain his success in San Francisco, which by the way there hasnt been of since his 2010 grumble about Brian Sabeans roster restock, he said, Its just a team. A team is a team. It doesnt matter who Im facing.

In other words, history is for the customers, to amuse themselves while they wait in a concessions line. The participants dont look backward a lot.

Latos can look backward at one of his best starts ever, though. In holding the Giants to a third-inning single by Brandon Crawford and a ninth-inning triple by Brandon Belt, he consolidated the mastery he showed five days earlier in a complete game win against Milwaukee, and gave the Reds not only a leg up on the Giants in the National League race, but gave Baker another alternative to ace Johnny Cueto.

At least on days when the Reds pitch in the airport that is American Telephone and Telegraph Southwestern Bell Corporation Pacific Bell Park -- that is, as opposed to the Peet's Coffee kiosk that is Cincinnati's Great American Ball Park.

More than that, he sent a brief but pointed message to the Giants that they have more than just the Los Angeles Dodgers to worry about.

That last part is not something that should come as news to the Giants. Like Washington and Cincinnati and Los Angeles and Pittsburgh and St. Louis and Atlanta and New York and Arizona, San Franciscos position is fluid, and even stretches like their four consecutive shutouts this dont figure to be prolonged things.

Put another way, theres more error than margin here for everyone.

And put still another way, the nostalgia fest Sunday, in which all the ups, downs and all-arounds of the 2002 season are a lot like the history of World War I. The immediacy of a long and likely confusing playoff race is already beginning to take shape, with two natural standings breaks beginning to take form after the nine-hole (Arizona) and then after the 14-hole (Colorado).

It is not hard to imagine that those will hold and even widen as Colorado, Houston and Milwaukee drop out of contention, perhaps close enough to the trade deadline to make them sellers in an eager market. But it is equally fathomable that Miami and Philadelphia might get their acts and health together and join the top nine in a real contender pigpile, the kind that induces Bud Selig to broaden the playoffs every few years whether they need them or not.

So 2002 can hang. And while youre at it, fretting about Barry Zitos departure from the strike zone in the fourth and fifth innings is also yesterdays news, even though it is still today. Zito walked six of eight hitters in those two innings but was saved a righteous beating because of a strikeout of Latos to end the fourth and a line drive by Jay Bruce with the bases loaded right into Crawfords glove.

In other words, though you might not know it looking at his pitches out of context, Zito did meet his burden by giving the Giants a chance to win, just as Latos was insuring that they actually had no chance at all.

Not complaints about Sabean stacking the deck two years ago from Latos. No grumblings about the way 2002 ended from Baker. Latos had a win to enjoy, and Baker had some fish to subdue. In baseball, now and forever, nothing is as important as the here and now.

Five mistakes that will haunt Giants after 77th loss of 2017

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USATSI

Five mistakes that will haunt Giants after 77th loss of 2017

SAN FRANCISCO — If the Giants were in a different situation, Tuesday night’s loss was the kind that really would sting for a few days. As is, it was simply loss No. 77 in a stunningly bad season. 

The Giants went down 4-3 in somewhat familiar fashion, with their offense failing to break through and their bullpen coming up short. But this loss, No. 77, was also about small mistakes, both mental and physical. Let’s count down some of the ways the Giants went down:

--- Gorkys Hernandez, a late addition to the lineup because Hunter Pence has a tight hamstring, dropped a fly ball in deep right in the fourth inning. That cost Jeff Samardzija a run and a few more pitches. Bruce Bochy said Pence likely will be off Wednesday and then return Friday in Arizona. 

--- Bochy pulled Samardzija after just 89 pitches, and it was certainly peculiar in the moment. The thing is, the intention fit in with the reality of this season. Samardzija has carried a heavy load and Bochy was trying to protect his arm a bit. 

“The inning before, he logged some pitches,” Bochy said. “I’ve worked him pretty hard and I’m really looking after him as much as anything. We’re trying to give some guys a break and it didn’t work out. We had some guys lined up in the seventh, eighth, ninth — it just didn’t work out in the seventh.”

--- You can’t really argue with protecting a big-money pitcher in a down year. But Bochy probably wishes he had chosen someone other than Albert Suarez, who was fresher than others but has now given up runs in six of seven appearances. Suarez turned a one-run lead into a one-run deficit. It was more glaring when Kyle Crick entered and pitched 1 1/3 sharp innings. 

--- The Giants still had a chance — it helped that the Brewers took a dominant Josh Hader out of the game just because he’s a lefty and Nick Hundley bats right-handed — and they put two on in the eighth. Denard Span hit a soft single to right and Phil Nevin waved Hundley, who has catcher’s legs. He was out by a mile. Bochy said he was fine with forcing the issue there, although that’s a call Nevin probably wants back. 

Another twist on the play: Bochy could have put speedy Orlando Calixte in for Hundley and then moved Pablo Sandoval over to first in the next inning, with Calixte at third. He didn’t second-guess that decision.

“He was out pretty easily,” Bochy said. “I don’t know if a little more speed would have helped out.”

--- In the bottom of the ninth, Kelby Tomlinson singled. He was promptly caught stealing second with the heart of the order coming up. Again, a decision that went the visiting team’s way. 

Those moments could be defended or second-guessed. On another night, maybe they all work out and the Giants win 3-2, or 6-4. On this night, it was simply a familiar script, and loss No. 77.

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' 4-3 loss to Brewers

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USATSI

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' 4-3 loss to Brewers

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SAN FRANCISCO — Just when it seemed the Giants were starting to find some continuity in their bullpen, they have taken a couple of steps back. 

Two days after Hunter Strickland imploded late, Albert Suarez gave up the lead. The Giants lost 4-3 to the Brewers in a game that dragged. The Brewers did open the window a bit in the bottom of the eighth and Denard Span bounced a single to right with two outs and two on. Phil Nevin waved Nick Hundley all the way around third and Hundley was thrown out by 10 feet to end the inning. 

Anyway, here are five other things to know … 

—- Just one of Jeff Samardzija’s six innings went 1-2-3, and Bruce Bochy turned to the bullpen after just 89 pitches. Samardzija was charged with two runs, one of them earned. It was a little odd that he came out so early. 

—- Suarez entered in the seventh with a one-run lead and gave up two runs before being lifted. He has allowed a run in six of his last seven appearances. 

—- Brandon Crawford momentarily gave the Giants the lead with a two-run homer, his 11th. He is definitely starting to hit his stride. Crawford has four extra base hits and six RBI on the homestand. 

—- Why is it so hard for the Giants to sign power bats? Well, just ask Eric Thames. He hit a 433-foot blast to lead off the third but ended up with just a triple when it bounced off the top of the bricks in right-center. Per Statcast data, Thames is the first player in the last three years to hit a ball more than 430 feet and not get a homer. He was stranded at third. 

—- Over in Sacramento, a couple of rehab appearances went as planned. Johnny Cueto threw three scoreless innings for the River Cats; he will make at least one more minor league start. Joe Panik was 0-for-2 in five innings; he will join the San Jose Giants on Wednesday for another rehab game.