For Giants, Saturday sucked a very great deal

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For Giants, Saturday sucked a very great deal

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SAN FRANCISCO -- Brandon Phillips saw his starting pitcher Johnny Cueto shut down after eight pitches. He heard the crowd at the Thing On King roar their delight. And he copped to the feeling of despair that washed over the one part of the ballpark that wasn't populated by Giants or their faithful customers.

"When Johnny went down, I was like, 'Oh gosh. Oh no. We're done. Why? Why?'" the Cincinnati second baseman said. "It sucked a little bit."

Well, it sucked more than a little bit for the Reds. But as time went on, it started to suck less and less until it didn't really suck at all, except for the Giants. For them, Saturday sucked a very great deal.

BAGGS' INSTANT REPLAY: Reds beat Cain, Giants in Game 1

Phillips was one of several Reds who gave the Giants that general feeling of suck in Game 1 of this National League Division Series. He turned on a delicious and nutritious Matt Cain curve ball to give the Reds a 2-0 lead, he drove in an insurance run in the ninth with a two-out single, he dove to save extra bases on a leadoff single by Giant right fielder Hunter Pence, and he verified what he claimed after the game:

"I'm good on TV."

RELATED: Phillips shines under bright lights

But lots of Reds were good on TV, including manager Dusty Baker and pitching coach Bryan Price. Between their jerryrigging a solution to Cueto's first-inning back spasms, Mat Latos' four-inning relief performance, Jay Bruce's homer, Ryan Ludwick's defense, and mostly from relief pitching, the Reds took a 1-0 lead in the series that feels a lot more like 2-0 or 3-1, and in doing so, they saw to it that the only Giant that looked good was Buster Posey.

In other words, they brought home the suck.

There is no truly elegant alternate way to put it, for this was not an elegant game. It was more a white-knuckler on a 20-seat plane through bad weather and turbulence, and though the box score suggests that the Giants were dominated, what they really endured was a night of vertigo. Cueto to Sam LeCure to Latos to Sean Marshall to Jonathan Broxton to Aroldis Chapman is enough to make anyone's head wobble on its axis, and even though Broxton and Chapman seemed most vulnerable to offensive coercion, the Giants did too little too often to have it matter.

And therein lies the difficulty they face going into Game 2. The only quality at-bat they got with runners in scoring position all night was Cain's line-out to Bruce to end the second. Posey's home run off Latos was the one at-bat that brought the sellout crowd of 43,492 out of its torpor, but it was followed by nothing of substance.

The Giants' offense forced Cain to be perfect, which is not unusual for him or them. But it happened on a night when he plainly wasn't. He missed spots, he left curve balls like the one to Phillips in hittable places ("If he throws a fastball or a cutter, I'm back in the dugout with everyone else"), and he was not dominant on a night when dominance would have barely broken him even.

Suddenly, the onus of the series is squarely on San Francisco. A split is barely tolerable, but it is all the hope the Giants have, and they need Madison Bumgarner to be what Cain was not -- masterful. The Reds, who looked to be in shambles after eight pitches, may still have Cueto for Game 3 against (in all likelihood) Ryan Vogelsong, in which case they have lost nothing at all from a night that looked so . . . well, suckworthy halfway through Marco Scutaro's first at-bat.

Cueto said he feels fine, and Baker said, "You know how back spasms are. When it lets you go, it lets you go when it wants to."

But that's too far away for the Giants. They have to navigate another of Cincinnati's nasty starters, Bronson Arroyo, Sunday or go to Ohio needing a sweep in a park that is not kind to their kind of pitcher, whether it be Vogelsong, Barry Zito or Tim Lincecum.

In short, and with all apologies to the gods of strained metaphors, the suck is already on the other foot.

Dodgers trade former Giants reliever to Rays

Dodgers trade former Giants reliever to Rays

Sergio Romo is headed to the American League.

After being designated for assignment on Thursday, the veteran reliever was traded by the Dodgers along with cash considerations to the Tampa Bay Rays on Saturday evening.

The Dodgers will receive cash considerations or a player to be named later.

Romo's first season with the team he grew up rooting for didn't go as planned. In 30 games, Romo posted a 6.12 ERA.

The Brawley-native was drafted by the Giants in 2005 and spent nine seasons pitching for San Francisco.

https://twitter.com/Dodgers/status/888945320888901632

Pablo Sandoval singles in first at-bat with San Jose Giants

Pablo Sandoval singles in first at-bat with San Jose Giants

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In his first at-bat with the Giants organization in nearly three years, Pablo Sandoval singled to left field against Rancho Cucamonga.

Serving as the designated hitter, Sandoval batted right-handed against Rancho Cucamonga left-handed pitcher Caleb Ferguson.

Sandoval's single followed singles by prospects Steven Duggar and Bryan Reynolds.

First baseman Aramis Garcia followed with an RBI single, moving Sandoval to second base. But the next batter, Ryan Howard, hit a line drive to Quakes second baseman Drew Jackson, who stepped on second base to double off Sandoval.

In second at-bat, Sandoval flied out to deep left field for the final out of the bottom of the second inning.

With the bases loaded and one out in the bottom of the 4th, Sandoval grounded a ball deep into the hole at shortstop. Omar Estevez made the throw across the diamond for the out, but Sandoval picked up an RBI.

Sandoval signed a minor league deal with the Giants on Saturday. He will stay with Single-A San Jose until Triple-A Sacramento returns home from Tacoma.