Hensley had a whole different view of Posey collision

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Hensley had a whole different view of Posey collision

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Everyone in a Giants uniform canappreciate the sight of Buster Posey standing on his two feet, catching fastballsin the bullpen and unleashing his sweet swing in the batting cage.Every visage of Posey in action acts like a cooling balm onthose rough, raw images from the 12th inning on May 25.Right-hander Clay Hensley was there that awful night, too. But hisvantage point was a bit different.He was in the visiting dugout at AT&T Park, wearing aFlorida Marlins uniform. He was one of the first people to interact with rookiebaserunner Scott Cousins after his heat-seeking hit at the plate resulted in acatastrophic left leg injury to Posey, the Giants ebullient catcher.Different vantage point. Same perspective.It means a lot to everyone here, I know, to see Busterswinging the bat and catching pens, said Hensley, standing at his locker in the Scottsdale Stadium clubhouse after signing a non-guaranteedcontract with the Giants late this offseason. Its refreshing to everybody.But as someone who was on the other side, I can tell you its refreshing to me,too.RELATED: Big test looms for Posey; status unclear for spring opener
Hensley faced Posey in the bottom of the eighth inning withthe Marlins clinging to a 3-2 lead. He retired the Giants cleanup hitter on aweak lineout. Then he struck out Cody Ross to protect the lead and complete hiscontribution for the day.Florida padded its lead in the top of the ninth, but theGiants thrilled the home crowd by scoring four to send the game to extrainnings. Aubrey Huffs two-run single tied it. Posey followed with a single offLeo Nunez (later discovered to be Juan Oviedo). But with the winning run inscoring position, Ross flied out to deep left field. For the season, Rossbatted .149 with two outs and runners in scoring position. This would prove tobe his most painful failure.The Giants dramatic comeback only assured them pain andmisery in extra innings.Cousins, a University of San Francisco alumnus, a die-hard Giants fan as a kid and the lastplayer on the Marlins roster, pinch-ran after catcher John Buck hit a leadoffsingle against Guillermo Mota in the 12th. A sacrifice and a singlemoved Cousins to third base. When Emilio Bonifacio lifted a fly ballto medium right field, Cousins went back to tag and then ran full speed, fully expecting strong-armed NateSchierholtzs throw to beat him to the plate.The throw short-hopped Posey, who fell to his knees as heturned to tag with an empty glove. Replays showed Cousins had access to a portion of theplate, but he ran inside the baseline and speared the catcher. The hit was rightshoulder on right shoulder. Posey was thrust backward and his left leg had noplace to go. He tore three ankle ligaments, fractured his fibula and writhed onthe dirt in agony.It was a collision that altered the orbit of two lives.Posey was done for the season. He'd require two surgeries and months of rehab before he could walk again. Cousins pain was about to begin, too.Awful, Hensley said. Youve got a player, Scott Cousins, who plays hard and hes a good guy and a good kid. He just wanted to make aplay to help win a game. Hes in his home town, trying to cut a groove forhimself with the ballclub. He personally felt he had no room (to slide). Nobodycan say one way or the other besides him.It was tough to watch. I know for his part of things,nobody felt worse than he did. You play the game hard, but you dont want tohurt anybody.The visiting clubhouse held no jubilation after Cousins runmade the difference in Floridas 7-6 victory. Never has a major league teamfell so silent after winning a 12-inning game on the road.It was quiet. Nobody was celebrating, Hensley said. I canguarantee you there wasnt any, Yeah, we got his ass! Nothing like that.Everybody was trying to figure out how bad it was. At the same time, Cousinswas pretty distraught wrecked, really by it as well.Youre playing to win every time you take the field, butbaseball is like one big family. You dont want anyone to get hurt.It didnt end there. The next day, Anibal Sanchez shut out ashell-shocked Giants lineup. The Marlins 1-0 victory gave them a three-gamesweep, and at 29-19, they held the third best record in the major leagues.They proceeded to lose 22 of their next 25 games.It was a perfect storm of things that went bad, saidHensley, who watched as manager Edwin Rodriguez resigned and dominating aceJosh Johnson went on the disabled list with more arm trouble. We lost J.J.,who was such a huge part of our team. It just all went downhill from there.Cousins carried an additional burden, Hensley said.(The collision) is something that affected him for a long time, Hensleysaid. Wed try. We'd say things. I remember I told him, Hey, all you can do is keepyour head up, keep working hard. Thats easy to say. I mean, this happened tohim in his home city. Now we get home (to Miami) and hes getting hate mail. It wasreally, really tough for him. He was definitely, really upset about the whole situation.The Giants and Marlins didnt throw beanballs at each other the dayafter the collision. But there is sure to be speculation and anxiety in the daysleading up to the first meeting between the clubs in 2012.Eerily enough, the Giants will be in South Florida forthe one-year anniversary of the collision. Theyll play the Marlins May 24-27.The Giants will face a whole new team with new uniforms, a new ballpark, a new closer (Heath Bell), new shortstop (Jose Reyes) and new manager (Ozzie Guillen). Theyre called the Miami Marlins now. Cousins isntguaranteed to be on the roster; hes fighting for a job with former Giant AaronRowand, a non-roster invitee.(Cousins actually gave his No.33 to Rowand and took No.6, calling itwas a nod to former Giants great J.T. Snow an odd coincidence, since Snowonce tried to take out a Florida catcher, Ivan Rodriguez, at the plate on thefinal play of the 2003 NL Division Series.)Hensley understands that there will be another wave of anger and resentmentfrom many Giants fans as May 25 approaches. As someone who has been on both sides, he isuniquely positioned and willing -- to broker a peace between the clubs.Well, sure I would, he said. But Id say, from what Ivegathered being around this team to this point, that shouldnt be necessary.This is a team that will go about its business as usual.If you rehash it, if you open up that wound, its going tobe tough for everybody to move on. I can tell you from being on that side,there was nothing malicious in that locker room. Its a play that happened andit was terrible. But it happened.

After another Giants clunker, Bochy tells players 'enough is enough'

After another Giants clunker, Bochy tells players 'enough is enough'

SAN FRANCISCO — A few minutes after yet another missed opportunity at the plate Sunday, a voice came over a speaker in the press box at AT&T Park and announced a 524th consecutive sellout. It nicely summed up this current stretch of Giants baseball. 

The seats are emptier than they used to be at first pitch, and they were just about abandoned in the ninth inning of an 8-2 loss, but for the most part the fans are still showing up in droves. One woman brought a toaster by the dugout Sunday morning and asked players and coaches to sign it, hoping to recapture the magic from across the bridge. Another, Bryan Stow, made his first appearance of the season at AT&T Park, met with Bruce Bochy, and said he hoped to see a win. As Matt Moore started warming up, a band set up on top of the visiting dugout to play hits that celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love. 

For a while, AT&T Park was rocking. And then, as has happened so often this summer, the game started. 

The Giants turned in another epic clunker in a season full of them. They have lost 12 of their last 13 games and 21 of 26, but it’s worse than the raw numbers. On most nights, some in the organization have noted privately, they are simply boring. It’s one thing to lose, it’s quite another to do it in this way. 

“There’s no getting around it,” Bochy said after the sweep. “I’ve been through some tough stretches here and this is as tough as any stretch I’ve seen. For some reason the baseball gods are really testing us here and (testing) this group. It’s not that they’re not coming out ready or trying, but enough is enough.

“At some point, we’ve got to find a way to get this thing turned around.”

Even a slight pivot would be welcomed by the faithful. There were scattered boos Sunday, the latest in a growing trend. This is a fan base that has seen the highest highs, but rarely in franchise history have the lows been this low. 

The crowd no longer turns to the rally lights that were used so often in an awful April, but the noise still grows with each new rally. And then, every single time Sunday, the Giants killed off any hope. 

In the second inning, a Brandon Belt bunt single and Brandon Crawford bloop put two on, but a pair of rookies flied out. 

In the third, the bases were loaded ahead of Buster Posey. He flied out to bring one run across, and there were still runners on the corners for Belt, who leads the team in homers. On a 2-2 count, Hunter Pence inexplicably took off for second. He was caught, the inning was over, and the two-run Mets lead was intact. Bochy said he did not send Pence. 

In the sixth, there were two on with no outs for Posey. Both runners bolted to stay out of a double play. Posey popped up to first -- for a double play.

“He’s not a guy that strikes out, so I’m pretty confident sending runners with Buster,” Bochy said. “We can’t keep laying back. We’re trying to force the issue a bit and stay out of double plays.”

In the eighth, the Giants loaded the bases for Posey and Belt. Posey grounded out. Belt struck out for the third time. 

“We’re getting guys out there,” Bochy said. “We’re not doing enough damage.”

Matt Moore’s damage was self-inflicted. He twice gave up homers to the guy — Rene Rivera — hitting in front of the pitcher. Moore said he has stopped throwing his cutter the past three starts and tried to get his four-seamer going, but the Mets were teeing off. Moore gave up five runs on seven hits. He was pulled in the fifth, left to think about mechanics that still aren’t right. 

“The cutter is a little bit different of a pitch and at times it can take away from the four-seam fastball location-wise, and command of the four-seam was starting to go down the more I threw (the cutter),” Moore said. “I’m anxious to get back to it, but the foundation has got to be throwing the four-seam fastball. I need to execute where they’re carrying through the zone, not running or cutting.”

Moore said his confidence is fine and his problems are not physical. Others can no longer say that. Austin Slater, a rare bright spot in this five-win month, was pulled with a tight hip flexor. He was headed for an MRI. 

Slater is too young to be one of the players Bochy approached after the game. He said he talked to a few, though, passing along that “enough is enough” message. Moore, last in the National League in ERA (6.04), was not one who needed a reminder. 

“I’m sitting on a six right now with not a lot of wins and not enough team wins when I’m throwing,” he said. “It’s been 'enough' for me for the last couple of months.”

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways as Giants get swept by Mets at home

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways as Giants get swept by Mets at home

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO — The Mets spent the first half of this week in Los Angeles, where they got swept by the Dodgers and outscored 36-11. Their beat writers publicly wrote an end to any thoughts of the postseason. The fan base renewed the calls for manager Terry Collins to be fired. 

That’s where they were. And then they flew to San Francisco. 

AT&T Park continues to be a place where others get healthy, and this weekend it was the Mets. The Giants lost 8-2 on Sunday, getting swept by a similarly disappointing team. They have lost 12 of their last 13 games. 

There’s not much more to be said about it, but I did anyway. Here are five things to know from the day a relief pitcher got an at-bat but it would have been far too cruel to text your friends … 

—- Matt Moore’s line: 4 1/3 innings, seven hits, five earned runs, three walks, five strikeouts. Through 16 starts, he has a 6.04 ERA and 1.61 WHIP. He ranks last among qualified NL starters in ERA. Only Matt Cain (1.73) has a worse WHIP. Good times. 

—- Mets righty Rafael Montero entered with an 0-4 record and 6.49 ERA. He gave up one run in 5 2/3 innings. Good times. 

—- With runners on the corners and two outs in the third inning, Brandon Belt strolled to the plate. He leads the team in homers. Hunter Pence tried to steal second for some reason and he was caught, ending the inning and keeping Belt from batting in a two-run game. Good times. 

—- With two on and no outs in the sixth, the Giants sent the runners to make sure Buster Posey didn’t hit into a double play. Posey popped up softly to first and Joe Panik was doubled off of second. Good times. 

—- One last bit of bad news: Austin Slater was removed from the game with a tight right hip flexor.