Moore rocked for five runs, Giants only muster two hits in loss

Moore rocked for five runs, Giants only muster two hits in loss

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO -- Tyler Chatwood's extra work on offspeed pitches during spring training made a huge difference Saturday.

Chatwood pitched 5 2/3 perfect innings before Chris Marrero's single and finished with a two-hitter for the Colorado Rockies in his first big league shutout, a 5-0 win over the San Francisco Giants.

Chatwood (1-2) struck out four and walked one, lowering his ERA from 6.35 to 3.54. He threw 67 of 105 pitches for strikes in his second complete game in 91 major league starts.

"The first two outings I didn't feel like I threw the ball bad, but I gave up homers that killed me," Chatwood said. "Today my curveball was there, and I think that was a difference-maker. That separation in velocity was big for me today."

He retired 17 consecutive batters before Marrero lined a single into right field. Joe Panik singled leading off the seventh.

"The curve, change cutter and slider all came into play today," Rockies manager Bud Black said. "The mix of pitches was something we've talked about, and he put that into play today. It was an outstanding effort and one of the best games I've seen in a while just from a pure pitching standpoint."

Chatwood's teammates didn't let on that he was flirting with perfection. A sellout crowd ATT Park did.

"I realized it because every time I was on deck or if I stepped out of the dugout all the fans were saying. `I hope you blow it,'" Chatwood recalled.

Nolan Arenado had three hits, including a home run off Matt Moore (1-2), who allowed five runs, 10 hits and three walks in 5 2/3 innings.

Arenado's fourth home run this season put the Rockies ahead 1-0 in the third, and Charlie Blackmon hit a two-run single in a three-run fourth that included Dustin Garneau's RBI double.

Stephen Cardullo added a run-scoring single in the fifth.

Giants left fielder Jarrett Parker broke his right collarbone crashing into the wall on a running catch, robbing D.J. LaMahieu of an extra-base hit with two outs in the fourth inning. After the collision, Parker sprinted toward the infield, stopped and dropped to his knees on the outfield grass. He grimaced, was examined by trainers and was replaced by Aaron Hill.

"You know you are all in when you make a play like that," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "You're focused. I had no idea he was going to catch that ball. To see him stay locked in was a hats-off moment to him and a huge play, it kept us in the game."

TRAINER'S ROOM:
Rockies: OF David Dahl, out since spring training with a rib strain, joined the team on Friday night and will be evaluated as he continues baseball activities. "I feel good," the 22-year-old said. "Honestly, I've been saying I'm ready to play but (trainers) said it can feel good but it still might not be healed." ... RHP Chad Qualls, on the DL with a strained right forearm, pitched two shutout innings in separate outings during an injury rehabilitation assignment with Triple-A Albuquerque this week. Manager Bud Black said he won't return until he pitches pain-free on consecutive days.

Giants: Manager Bruce Bochy expressed guarded confidence C Buster Posey will be ready to come off the seven-day concussion DL on Tuesday when the Giants are scheduled to open a three-game series at Kansas City. "It's going very well with Buster, we'll push it a little bit more tomorrow, but no issues swinging the bat, he got quite a few swings in," Bochy said.

UP NEXT:
Rockies: RHP Antonio Senzatela, Colorado's scheduled starter Sunday, pitched seven strong innings against San Diego in his last start for his first major league win. The 22-year-old rookie went 4-1 with a 1.82 ERA last season for Double-A Hartford.

Giants: RHP Jeff Samardzija, slated to start for San Francisco, is 0-2 with a 6.75 ERA.

Why you shouldn't freak out in June about Cueto's opt-out

Why you shouldn't freak out in June about Cueto's opt-out

SAN FRANCISCO — There’s a very important fact you need to keep in mind when talk of Johnny Cueto’s opt-out comes up, as it so often will over the next six weeks: The Giants always expected him to opt-out after this season, from the moment the ink was dry on the six-year, $130-million contract. 

When you sign at the top of your game and have a chance to hit the market at 31 years old and cash out a second time, you take it. Those are just the rules of professional sports. On the day Cueto was introduced, his agent, Bryce Dixon, said the two-year opt-out was important because they felt Cueto didn’t get a totally fair shot at free agency. 

“Johnny, a little bit unfairly, had a lot of questions about his arm,” Dixon said in December of 2015. “I felt we could reestablish his actual value … He knows he’s as good as (David) Price and (Zack) Greinke, but his situation was a little different.”

The Giants were fine with this, too. The flip side of the opt-out is that if you have the chance to pay a dominant right-hander $46 million over two years, and then escape his mid- to late-thirties, you do it. Every time. You don’t even blink. 

So, here we are, in June of the second year of that deal, with reports that Cueto will opt out. You should take a deep breath because you should have already expected this. But if you didn’t, take comfort in this: By all indications, Cueto has not made a decision, even with the Giants having an unimaginably poor season. 

First of all, Cueto can't make a decision in June. What if the blisters return and he repeats his April ERA a couple more times? What if his elbow starts barking? There are no guarantees with pitchers, and until Cueto gets through the second season, there will be no finality with his decision. 

Aside from the fact that he really can’t make that decision, though, sources insist Cueto hasn’t made up his mind or even thought much about it. People familiar with his thinking continue to say the focus has been baseball all season long, from spring training through his last start. 

Cueto is said to be happy in San Francisco and he enjoys pitching in front of the crowd at AT&T Park. His biggest concern has been wins and losses, and in that respect, this has been a disappointing year for all involved. 

That record has brought the Giants to a crossroads, and this is where it gets interesting. The easy solution is to trade Cueto next month, avoid the opt-out situation entirely, and add prospects to a system lacking them. But, it’s complicated. The Giants do not intend a full teardown, and if they’re going for it again in 2018 — with their core of Buster Posey, Brandon Crawford, Madison Bumgarner, etc. locked in, that’s the plan — they’ll want that second ace at the top of the rotation. And if Bumgarner doesn’t return to form after an injury, they’ll need Cueto’s presence. 

The Giants have until July 31 to decide what to do with Cueto. He has until three days after the World Series ends to decide what to do with his contract. Here in June, by all indications, those decisions haven’t been made. 

Giants lineup: Pence hitting third, Panik back into two-hole

Giants lineup: Pence hitting third, Panik back into two-hole

Clutch, late-game hitting by Hunter Pence has propelled him to the three hole as the Giants look to bounce back vs the Braves. Bruce Bochy has released the rest of his lineup for Game 2 of the series...

San Francisco Giants:
1. Kelby Tomlinson (R) 3B
2. Joe Panik (L) 2B
3. Hunter Pence (R) RF
4. Buster Posey (R) 1B
5. Austin Slater (R) LF
6. Brandon Crawford (L) SS
7. Nick Hundley (R) C
8. Gorkys Hernandez (R) CF
9. Matt Cain (R) P

Atlanta Braves:
1. Ender Inciarte (L) CF
2. Brandon Phillips (R) 2B
3. Nick Markakis (L) RF
4. Matt Kemp (R) LF
5. Matt Adams (L) 1B
6. Kurt Suzuki (R) C
7. Dansby Swanson (R) SS
8. Johan Camargo (S) 3B
9. Jaime Garcia (L) P